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Ron Suskind

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NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
Since the release of Ron Suskind's new book, “Confidence Men,"  White House officials have sought to disparage his reporting and paint the book as an unfair depiction of the Obama presidency. And yet someone in Obama's orbit opened an important door for the author: Suskind landed an interview with the president. A White House advisor said Thursday the sit-down with Obama was an attempt to alter the “trajectory" of the book -- to let Obama provide a corrective to any misleading bits of information Suskind might have heard.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2012
The Escape Artists: How Obama's Team Fumbled the Recovery Noam Scheiber Simon & Schuster: 351 pp., $28 Confidence Men: Wall Street, Washington, and the Education of a President Ron Suskind Harper Collins: 515 pp., $29.99
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NEWS
September 21, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas
No book about the Obama presidency appears to have unnerved the White House quite so much as "Confidence Men" by Ron Suskind, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who has developed a niche in the specialized art of parting the curtain on presidential dealings. The book gives a tough assessment of Obama's leadership style.  Brainy but untested, Obama proved unable to exert control over a dysfunctional economic team that was dubious about his orders, the book concludes. Through Tweets and interviews, White House officials have sought to discredit the book, questioning its basic accuracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2012 | By David Lauter, Los Angeles Times
On Oct. 28 and 29, 1929, when the great crash devastated the stock market, Herbert Hoover had been president just shy of eight months. For more than three years, he lingered in office as the nation's economy sank into Depression. By the time ofFranklin D. Roosevelt's inauguration, hard times and Hoover had become near synonymous. Barack Obama's timing resembled Hoover's far more than Roosevelt's. The 2008 financial panic hit on George W. Bush's watch with the collapse of Lehman Brothers less than two months before the election.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
The White House has found common cause with an unlikely ally in its campaign to discredit author Ron Suskind's unflattering portrait of the inner workings of the administration: Karl Rove. Communications director Dan Pfeiffer, in a Twitter posting Tuesday, quotes the former George W. Bush right-hand man's assessment that Suskind "tends to exaggerate," even as Rove explained that he's not "certain how much" of his new book is accurate. Strange bedfellows, indeed. Suskind's new book, "Confidence Men: Wall Street, Washington and the Education of a President," officially hits bookstores today.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2008 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
How an administration as fixated on loyalty and conformity as this one ever came to produce so unending a series of defectors eager to tell all to anyone who will listen is a topic that probably will keep psycho-historically inclined scholars of the presidency fully employed well into the decade after next.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2012
The Escape Artists: How Obama's Team Fumbled the Recovery Noam Scheiber Simon & Schuster: 351 pp., $28 Confidence Men: Wall Street, Washington, and the Education of a President Ron Suskind Harper Collins: 515 pp., $29.99
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas
One question that has arisen since the publication of “Confidence Men,” an insider account of the Obama White House, concerns the care and feeding of author Ron Suskind. Why did White House advisors let Suskind sit for an interview with the president? As any White House reporter can tell you, scoring an interview with Barack Obama is no small feat. His time is pretty important; ours, not so much. Here, though, Suskind was granted face time with Obama and went on to produce a book that portrayed him as a chief executive who struggled to manage his own team of economic advisors.
OPINION
August 6, 2008 | Tim Rutten
The controversy that erupted Tuesday over Ron Suskind's new book-length account of the Bush/Cheney administration's conduct of the war on terrorism raises some interesting questions about the way publishers treat a literary genre that has become increasingly vital to our political journalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2004 | Todd Gitlin, Special to The Times
Ron Suskind's compelling, disturbing account of the Bush White House as seen (mainly) by former Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill is already famous, or notorious, so incandescent was the burst of publicity that accompanied the book's publication.
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
Since the release of Ron Suskind's new book, “Confidence Men,"  White House officials have sought to disparage his reporting and paint the book as an unfair depiction of the Obama presidency. And yet someone in Obama's orbit opened an important door for the author: Suskind landed an interview with the president. A White House advisor said Thursday the sit-down with Obama was an attempt to alter the “trajectory" of the book -- to let Obama provide a corrective to any misleading bits of information Suskind might have heard.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas
One question that has arisen since the publication of “Confidence Men,” an insider account of the Obama White House, concerns the care and feeding of author Ron Suskind. Why did White House advisors let Suskind sit for an interview with the president? As any White House reporter can tell you, scoring an interview with Barack Obama is no small feat. His time is pretty important; ours, not so much. Here, though, Suskind was granted face time with Obama and went on to produce a book that portrayed him as a chief executive who struggled to manage his own team of economic advisors.
NEWS
September 21, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas
No book about the Obama presidency appears to have unnerved the White House quite so much as "Confidence Men" by Ron Suskind, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who has developed a niche in the specialized art of parting the curtain on presidential dealings. The book gives a tough assessment of Obama's leadership style.  Brainy but untested, Obama proved unable to exert control over a dysfunctional economic team that was dubious about his orders, the book concludes. Through Tweets and interviews, White House officials have sought to discredit the book, questioning its basic accuracy.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
The White House has found common cause with an unlikely ally in its campaign to discredit author Ron Suskind's unflattering portrait of the inner workings of the administration: Karl Rove. Communications director Dan Pfeiffer, in a Twitter posting Tuesday, quotes the former George W. Bush right-hand man's assessment that Suskind "tends to exaggerate," even as Rove explained that he's not "certain how much" of his new book is accurate. Strange bedfellows, indeed. Suskind's new book, "Confidence Men: Wall Street, Washington and the Education of a President," officially hits bookstores today.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2008 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
How an administration as fixated on loyalty and conformity as this one ever came to produce so unending a series of defectors eager to tell all to anyone who will listen is a topic that probably will keep psycho-historically inclined scholars of the presidency fully employed well into the decade after next.
OPINION
August 6, 2008 | Tim Rutten
The controversy that erupted Tuesday over Ron Suskind's new book-length account of the Bush/Cheney administration's conduct of the war on terrorism raises some interesting questions about the way publishers treat a literary genre that has become increasingly vital to our political journalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2012 | By David Lauter, Los Angeles Times
On Oct. 28 and 29, 1929, when the great crash devastated the stock market, Herbert Hoover had been president just shy of eight months. For more than three years, he lingered in office as the nation's economy sank into Depression. By the time ofFranklin D. Roosevelt's inauguration, hard times and Hoover had become near synonymous. Barack Obama's timing resembled Hoover's far more than Roosevelt's. The 2008 financial panic hit on George W. Bush's watch with the collapse of Lehman Brothers less than two months before the election.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2006 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
FOR a government so obsessed with secrecy that it has weighed prosecuting reporters for espionage, George W. Bush's administration has spawned an extraordinary number of what are essentially book-length leaks. Partly, that's because fortune has summoned this White House to govern in wrenchingly dramatic times, and even serious people are inclined to talk about exciting things.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2006 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
FOR a government so obsessed with secrecy that it has weighed prosecuting reporters for espionage, George W. Bush's administration has spawned an extraordinary number of what are essentially book-length leaks. Partly, that's because fortune has summoned this White House to govern in wrenchingly dramatic times, and even serious people are inclined to talk about exciting things.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2004 | Todd Gitlin, Special to The Times
Ron Suskind's compelling, disturbing account of the Bush White House as seen (mainly) by former Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill is already famous, or notorious, so incandescent was the burst of publicity that accompanied the book's publication.
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