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Ron Taylor

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2012
Ron Taylor Filmed shark for 'Jaws' Ron Taylor, 78, an Australian marine conservationist who helped film some of the dramatic underwater footage used in the classic shark thriller "Jaws," died Sunday at a Sydney hospital after battling leukemia. Taylor and his wife, Valerie, spent years filming great white sharks and trying to persuade a wary public that the much-feared creatures were beautiful animals worthy of respect. Their stunning up-close images of sharks drew the attention of "Jaws" director Steven Spielberg, who asked the couple to capture footage of a great white for his 1975 blockbuster.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2012
Ron Taylor Filmed shark for 'Jaws' Ron Taylor, 78, an Australian marine conservationist who helped film some of the dramatic underwater footage used in the classic shark thriller "Jaws," died Sunday at a Sydney hospital after battling leukemia. Taylor and his wife, Valerie, spent years filming great white sharks and trying to persuade a wary public that the much-feared creatures were beautiful animals worthy of respect. Their stunning up-close images of sharks drew the attention of "Jaws" director Steven Spielberg, who asked the couple to capture footage of a great white for his 1975 blockbuster.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2002 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Taylor, an actor-singer who co-created and starred in the Tony-nominated musical revue "It Ain't Nothin' but the Blues" on Broadway, has died. He was 49. Taylor died Jan. 16 of an apparent heart attack at his home in Los Angeles. He had suffered a mild stroke in 1999 during the run of "It Ain't Nothin' but the Blues" at Lincoln Center in New York City but was back on stage five weeks later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2002 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Taylor, an actor-singer who co-created and starred in the Tony-nominated musical revue "It Ain't Nothin' but the Blues" on Broadway, has died. He was 49. Taylor died Jan. 16 of an apparent heart attack at his home in Los Angeles. He had suffered a mild stroke in 1999 during the run of "It Ain't Nothin' but the Blues" at Lincoln Center in New York City but was back on stage five weeks later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1998 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't gasp. That bug floating in the soup is the entree. It is, anyway, if Ron Taylor served up the dish. The former UC Irvine entomologist, who gained fame as the Bug Chef for his cookbooks and public appearances promoting the benefits of insect-eating, held a cooking demonstration Saturday at the Fullerton Arboretum, serving his "worm oatmeal cookies" and "insect trail mix" to a largely grossed-out crowd of youngsters and their parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1996 | SARAH A. KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ron Taylor didn't ask for fame then or now. The appearances on the Johnny Carson show, "To Tell the Truth" and the front-page headlines in the late '60s were not his idea. He was simply a researcher in the UC Irvine entomology department when his long and unusual Odyssey began with a Rotarian who wanted him to say a few words on any topic at a club luncheon. Searching for an interesting subject, Taylor latched onto a file he compiled in graduate school on eating bugs.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1999 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
On the morning of June 11, Ron Taylor, co-creator and member of the ensemble cast of Broadway's "It Ain't Nothin' but the Blues," woke up feeling pretty good. But when he looked in the mirror, he could see only half his face. This might trigger concern in most people. Taylor, however, took a shower, got in a taxi and headed to Lincoln Center's Vivian Beaumont Theater to attend to the day's business--even though, as he describes it now, "it looked like a storm was going on in one eye."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A bus carrying elderly tourists veered off a highway Wednesday and into a cow pasture, injuring dozens of people, the California Highway Patrol said. About 31 of the 35 passengers on the bus complained of minor to moderate injuries, said CHP Officer Levy Barnes. Seventeen were taken to a nearby hospital after the morning accident along California 12 near Travis Air Force Base.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | EMELYN CRUZ LAT
A softball game will bring community members and homeless people together today at Clover Park. The event, sponsored by the coalition of community groups known as Side by Side, is being held to raise awareness of issues concerning the homeless. "This is a community effort to bring area residents together and develop understanding and friendship," said Ron Taylor, one of the event's organizers. The ball game starts at 4 p.m. on the park's East Field at the end of 28th Street.
SPORTS
May 15, 1986
David Gutierrez will fight Russell Mitchell in the main event of tonight's six-fight card at the El Cortez Convention Center. Gutierrez (13-0), of San Diego, and Mitchell (9-3) are welterweights. The fight is scheduled for eight rounds. Jerry Grant (4-1-1) will face Ron Taylor (4-1-1) in an eight-round junior welterweight match, and Mike Randell (7-2) will fight Ron Daniels (6-2) in the third eight-rounder.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1999 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Diane Haithman is a Times staff writer
On the morning of June 11, Ron Taylor, co-creator and member of the ensemble cast of Broadway's "It Ain't Nothin' but the Blues," woke up feeling pretty good. But when he looked in the mirror, he could see only half his face. This might trigger concern in most people. Taylor, however, took a shower, got in a taxi and headed to Lincoln Center's Vivian Beaumont Theater to attend to the day's business--even though, as he describes it now, "it looked like a storm was going on in one eye."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1998 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Don't gasp. That bug floating in the soup is the entree. It is, anyway, if Ron Taylor served up the dish. The former UC Irvine entomologist, who gained fame as the Bug Chef for his cookbooks and public appearances promoting the benefits of insect-eating, held a cooking demonstration Saturday at the Fullerton Arboretum, serving his "worm oatmeal cookies" and "insect trail mix" to a largely grossed-out crowd of youngsters and their parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1996 | SARAH A. KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ron Taylor didn't ask for fame then or now. The appearances on the Johnny Carson show, "To Tell the Truth" and the front-page headlines in the late '60s were not his idea. He was simply a researcher in the UC Irvine entomology department when his long and unusual Odyssey began with a Rotarian who wanted him to say a few words on any topic at a club luncheon. Searching for an interesting subject, Taylor latched onto a file he compiled in graduate school on eating bugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1991
This is in response to Ron Taylor's article "Scouts Out at Catalina" (Times, Aug. 17). Let's see if we can convince the Catalina Island Co. to let the Scouts continue their campsite and select another site for the Cousteau Society. I'm a founding member of the Cousteau Society, and I was a member of BSA Troop No. 1, Santa Monica, and among the first to open Emerald Bay Camp in 1924. We had four WWI tents with eight cots in each tent; cooked over open fires with fire by friction or flint stone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1987
A homeowners' group opposed to building a 40-acre auto mall in Yorba Linda presented a referendum petition to the city clerk Thursday. Ron Taylor, chairman of Aware Concerned Citizens Organized for Responsible Development, said his group had gathered 4,332 signatures on the petition. "The City Council now has two options open to it," Taylor said. "It can either repeal the zone change (that allowed auto mall construction) or put the matter before the voters at a special election."
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