Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRon Unz
IN THE NEWS

Ron Unz

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1994
Profile RON UNZ Born: Sept. 20, 1961, Los Angeles Residence: Palo Alto Current position: Full-time candidate for governor, on leave from managing his small software company. Education: Bachelor's degrees in physics and history, Harvard University. Phi Beta Kappa. Recipient of a Churchill Science Fellowship to Cambridge University in England, where he studied quantum gravitation under Stephen Hawking. Career highlights: In the late 1980s, Unz took a leave of absence from Stanford University, where he was enrolled in a Ph.D.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
February 26, 2014 | Patt Morrison
Ron Unz knows his way around the California ballot. He ran for governor against Pete Wilson in the GOP primary 20 years ago. He lost big, but four years later he won with his Proposition 227, which altered California schools by effectively ending bilingual education and mainstreaming Spanish-speaking students. The sometimes conservative, sometimes libertarian Republican entrepreneur-turned-activist is going back to the ballot, collecting signatures for an initiative to raise the state's minimum wage to $12. It may seem counterintuitive but Unz contends it's an idea that's as conservative as they come.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1997
Your article describing a debate on our initiative against bilingual education (Nov. 9) was generally quite accurate and evenhanded, but it wrongly described me as a "billionaire." Although my software company has been successful, I have nowhere near that amount of wealth. Presumably your reporter took at face value the statements of the pro-bilingual advocate I was debating, which got those facts wrong, just as they did so many others on the subject of the debate itself. RON K. UNZ, Chairman English for the Children Palo Alto
BUSINESS
February 9, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - California's minimum wage is pegged to go up $1 an hour to $9 on July 1 and by another buck in 2016. But that isn't high enough or fast enough for Ron Unz, a Silicon Valley software entrepreneur who has dabbled in state politics over the years. The 52-year-old multimillionaire hopes to put a measure on the November ballot raising the minimum wage to $10 an hour March 1, 2015, and to $12 a year later. Unz said he's confident he will get the needed signatures of 504,760 registered voters by the June deadline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1998
What does it say about our system when a wealthy businessman can galvanize support on an emotional issue that is supposed to radically alter a core part of our children's education? Never mind that the businessman's information flew in the face of relevant research accepted by linguists, people who study aspects of language for a living, and educators. The evidence points to Ron Unz, a layman, leading a charge to wreak absurd havoc on our system. Amazingly, the system and we will allow this.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When 32-year-old theoretical physicist Ron Unz decided to run for governor, even some friends tried to talk him out of it. "Politics is not the kind of thing you expect geniuses to go into," said Eric Reyburn, who attended Harvard University with Unz. Rivko Knox, Unz's aunt, worried that the race would be brutal. "I said: 'Can you take criticism? What if you speak and people laugh at you?' " David Horowitz, the conservative activist, was more blunt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2000
Proposition 25 has nothing to do with campaign reform. If it was really about cleaning up politics, it would tackle the problems of soft money. But it doesn't. The only people who would benefit under Proposition 25 are millionaires, because it gives them unfair exemptions to spend unlimited amounts of their own money to get elected while placing campaign contribution limits on everyone else. Guess who is the sponsor and financial supporter for Proposition 25? Silicon Valley millionaire and two-time candidate Ron Unz. BARBARA FERGES Inglewood
NEWS
May 26, 1994
Radio talk show host Michael Jackson began Wednesday's debate by asking for another before the June 7 primary: between Gov. Pete Wilson and his Republican challenger, physicist Ron Unz. "Gov. Wilson, this is your formal invitation," said Jackson, who hosts a daytime talk show on KABC-AM (790). Later, he repeated his offer to make time for such an exchange of views: "I repeat, governor, I'll cancel anything we're doing."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1998
Re "Bilingual Ban Could Override Proposition 187," Commentary, Jan. 9: Ron Unz, get going and change the initiative to eliminate bilingual education, to avoid the inclusion of "illegal aliens." The last thing California taxpayers need is another faulty proposition to be stuck in court. When the California school system has been given yet another dramatically below-average rating, it's time to reveal and discuss the heart of the problem--it's the "illegal aliens," of course, and illegal children, at that!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2014 | By Anthony York
Ron Unz is back. The software engineer who authored a 1998 ballot initiative to end bilingual education, and challenged Gov. Pete Wilson in the 1994 Republican primary, is now out to make the conservative case for increasing the state's minimum wage to $12 per hour. Gov. Jerry Brown signed a measure last year that will make California's minimum wage the highest of any state at the nation -- $10 per hour by 2016. But that, Unz says, is not enough. He has a new ballot measure that would raise the state minimum wage to $12 per hour, a move Unz says could save the state tens of millions of dollars in welfare payments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2000
Proposition 25 has nothing to do with campaign reform. If it was really about cleaning up politics, it would tackle the problems of soft money. But it doesn't. The only people who would benefit under Proposition 25 are millionaires, because it gives them unfair exemptions to spend unlimited amounts of their own money to get elected while placing campaign contribution limits on everyone else. Guess who is the sponsor and financial supporter for Proposition 25? Silicon Valley millionaire and two-time candidate Ron Unz. BARBARA FERGES Inglewood
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1999
Re your interview with Ron Unz (Opinion, May 30): If we really want reform of big-money electoral politics, then we only need one initiative--an initiative to eliminate initiatives. Big-money interest groups buy the results with false advertising, slate mailers and disinformation campaigns. Let's dump the entire initiative system and hold our legislators to their duly elected task of writing the laws we are expected to live by. While we are at it, let's spend some of the savings feeding the hungry or educating our children.
OPINION
February 7, 1999
In "Speaker Urged to Rescind Unz Appointment" (Feb. 2), various Latino civil rights activists argue against the appointment by Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa of Ron Unz, promoter of Prop. 227, to a blue-ribbon panel on government finance. Marcos R. Contreras states, "We should not reward those who attack and hurt our community like Ron Unz." Contreras' position implies that there is but one community whose goals and needs should be considered by those making political appointments.
NEWS
February 2, 1999 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latino civil rights activists are urging state Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa (D-Los Angeles) to rescind his appointment of anti-bilingual education champion Ron Unz to a blue ribbon panel on government finance. Villaraigosa, reaching out to a political opponent, recently named Unz and 27 others to an advisory panel he created to examine ways to finance state and local government. Some in the Latino community say the move has backfired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1998
Re "Word Getting Out on Bilingual Class Waivers," Oct. 8. Not six months ago, Ron Unz was very effective in saying that children were in bilingual education against their parents' will. For many it may have seemed natural to not willfully want a child in this "failing" program. The Latino community, like all other segments of society, was said to support this proposition. Unz repeatedly tried to show compassion by saying that a waiver would protect the will of the few parents who wanted their children in a bilingual program.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|