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Ron Vawter

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NEWS
April 18, 1994 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Vawter, avant-garde stage actor seen in such mainstream films as "Philadelphia" and "Silence of the Lambs" but best remembered for a one-man show about two opposites on the issue of homosexuality, has died. He was 45. Vawter, who had suffered from AIDS since 1991, died of a heart attack Saturday while flying from Zurich to New York, his agent, Philip Carlson, said Sunday.
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NEWS
April 18, 1994 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Vawter, avant-garde stage actor seen in such mainstream films as "Philadelphia" and "Silence of the Lambs" but best remembered for a one-man show about two opposites on the issue of homosexuality, has died. He was 45. Vawter, who had suffered from AIDS since 1991, died of a heart attack Saturday while flying from Zurich to New York, his agent, Philip Carlson, said Sunday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1992 | PATRICK PACHECO, Patrick Pacheco is based in New York and is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Actor Ron Vawter thinks of Roy Cohn and Jack Smith as chameleons: men who changed the color of their skin to avoid being eaten. Cohn was a powerful right-wing lawyer who rose to prominence as the hatchet man for Joseph McCarthy, the redbaiting U.S. senator who bullied the political Establishment in the '50s. Smith was a performance artist whose 1962 avant-garde film "Flaming Creatures" featured cavorting drag queens. But what made these two "chameleons" vulnerable was their homosexuality.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1992 | PATRICK PACHECO, Patrick Pacheco is based in New York and is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Actor Ron Vawter thinks of Roy Cohn and Jack Smith as chameleons: men who changed the color of their skin to avoid being eaten. Cohn was a powerful right-wing lawyer who rose to prominence as the hatchet man for Joseph McCarthy, the redbaiting U.S. senator who bullied the political Establishment in the '50s. Smith was a performance artist whose 1962 avant-garde film "Flaming Creatures" featured cavorting drag queens. But what made these two "chameleons" vulnerable was their homosexuality.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The words are fictitious. The event is not. The persona virtually real: megalomanic, loud at inappropriate moments and unctuous as a matter of political expediency. That approximates the "Roy Cohn" half of Ron Vawter's "Roy Cohn/Jack Smith," that has taken up residence in MOCA's Ahmanson Auditorium. It is a coarse, comic fantasy. The second and more exotic half of the bill, "Jack Smith," is an intently observed re-creation of New York performance pioneer Jack Smith at work.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1990 | RAY LOYND
The PBS summer series "Alive From Off Center" kicks off its sixth season tonight with a wryly wicked video sonnet about fickle love called "Postcards" (11 p.m., Channel 28). A man and a woman, who seem achingly in love, discover that absence, in their case, breeds doubt and anxiety. What lights up this ever-so-mortal tale of doomed romance is the droll and deliciously ironic technique employed by director/writer Mark Rappaport.
NEWS
August 10, 1992 | KEVIN ALLMAN
The scene: The premiere of "Citizen Cohn," HBO Pictures' new biopic of lawyer Roy Cohn. Cohn was chief counsel to Communist-hunting Sen. Joe McCarthy and a powerhouse in New York and Washington society until his death in 1986. After the screening Thursday night at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, guests attended an al fresco party in the parking lot.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Video maker Shu Lea Cheang's vibrant experimental debut feature, "Fresh Kill," is self-described as "Eco-Cyber-Noia," and it's hard to improve upon that. She and writer Jessica Hagedorn concern themselves with the interaction of a deteriorating environment, burgeoning cyberspace and mounting urban paranoia to create a vividly contemporary background for their gentle lesbian love story.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | BILL HIGGINS
The Scene: Tuesday's benefit world premiere of TriStar's "Philadelphia" at the Cineplex Odeon theater. A buffet supper followed at the nearby Century Plaza Hotel. Though the film is primarily about AIDS and discrimination, "It's also about something much greater," said star Tom Hanks. "How we treat each other."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1988 | SUSAN REITER
Five of six performer awards given out in the fifth annual New York Dance and Performance Awards--a.k.a. the Bessies--went to members of dance companies that have appeared in the Los Angeles area in recent years. Among awards presented at the Brooklyn Academy of Music on Thursday was one for sustained achievement to Kate Johnson of the Paul Taylor Dance Company.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tom Kalin's "Swoon" (at the Hillcrest Cinemas) is an inventive low-budget black-and-white movie about killers in love, a doomed couple united by lust and crime whose murderous idyll is cut short by the outside world. The theme puts it in a rich film noir tradition, in the same vein as "Gun Crazy," "Double Indemnity" or "The Honeymoon Killers." But Kalin has an extra psychological screw-twist. His protagonists are, as the film's trailer announces, "geniuses," "Jews" and "queers."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1989 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
With enviable single-mindedness, the two handsome couples in Steven Soderbergh's electrifying psycho-sexual comedy occupy themselves with sex, with lies and with videotape, in a film of exactly that name. It's the funniest and saddest American movie since Jim Jarmusch landed straight in the middle of our consciousness, and it's possibly the most compelling. ("Sex, lies and videotape" is now opening at San Diego area theaters.
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