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Ron Wakabayashi

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BUSINESS
November 15, 1989 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Immediately after the news hit that a Japanese company was selling Little Black Sambo beachwear and toys in Japan last year, Ron Wakabayashi began getting furious calls from blacks. One caller to the Japanese American Citizens League national headquarters in San Francisco threatened to circulate racist caricatures of Japanese. Others cursed the JACL national director and hung up.
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BUSINESS
November 15, 1989 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Immediately after the news hit that a Japanese company was selling Little Black Sambo beachwear and toys in Japan last year, Ron Wakabayashi began getting furious calls from blacks. One caller to the Japanese American Citizens League national headquarters in San Francisco threatened to circulate racist caricatures of Japanese. Others cursed the JACL national director and hung up.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1990
In a bid to improve relations among the city's diverse racial and ethnic groups, Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley Thursday announced the appointment of an executive director for the Human Relations Commission--the first in 16 years. Ron Wakabayashi, 46, a United Way vice president who will assume the post May 29, has been asked to establish programs to deal with racism, sexism, homophobia, xenophobia and religious intolerance, Bradley said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1993
Actor Edward James Olmos has been nominated to the Los Angeles Human Relations Commission, lending a higher profile to a little-known group seeking to ease the city's racial strife. Mayor Tom Bradley's nomination, which has been languishing in committee for months, will become effective if it is approved by the City Council this month. The next mayor, who will take office July 1, will have to decide whether to keep Olmos in the post.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
As part of a weeklong series of events designed to address violence in American society, the YWCA will host a forum at the Skirball Cultural Center today examining racism and hate crimes. "Society, Conflicts and the Emerging Social Structure" will feature a panel of four local professors and an audience made up of government officials, educators and social workers, said YWCA program director Linda Robinson-Stevens, who helped organize the YWCA's second annual Week Without Violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1988 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL
Senate approval last week of reparations for Japanese-Americans who were interned during World War II was a long-awaited triumph for a national group that has worked for the bill's passage, the Japanese-American Citizens League. "It's marvelous, splendid; I am simply delighted that the Senate passed the bill," said Hitoshi Kajihara, president of the San Francisco-based league.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1995
Two recent developments should help to ease African Americans' suspicion that authorities are neglecting hate crimes in the Antelope Valley. First the FBI confirmed it is investigating recent race-related incidents for civil rights violations. Another opinion on several specific encounters is an excellent idea. And last week, County Supervisor Mike Antonovich proposed that the county Human Relations Commission lead a multi-agency study of the situation and propose action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1991 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his most direct acknowledgement of tensions between African-Americans and Korean-Americans, Mayor Tom Bradley on Tuesday denounced the Aug. 7 burning of a South Los Angeles liquor store, then made oblique references to a series of recent disputes in which two Korean-American merchants and two African-Americans were killed. At a news conference in front of the fire-gutted Champion Liquor Deli, the mayor asked for continued mediation attempts between the two groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1995 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The number of actively racist and potentially violent skinheads in the Antelope Valley is relatively small--40 to 100--according to a report by the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Rights. The report, released Friday, was prompted by several incidents, including a shooting into a car of African Americans in April, allegedly by a group of skinheads. "We're pleased that it's a relatively small group, but a group of any size causes concern," said County Supervisor Mike Antonovich.
NEWS
December 13, 1995 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its first report on hate crimes in California, the state Department of Justice documented 672 bias-related incidents during the last six months of 1994. Racial incidents made up the largest proportion of hate crimes, with blacks and whites the leading targets. The next largest category of complaints was tied to sexual orientation, followed by religion and then physical or mental disability. The figures, released Tuesday by Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1992 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks said Saturday that recalling battles against racism a generation ago "brings back memories I would rather forget." "But since I can't forget them, I deal with them the best that I can," the 79-year-old leader of the Alabama bus boycotts of the '50s told a cheering audience at Soka University near Calabasas. Although Parks travels the country talking about civil rights history, she said she does not live in the past. "I keep fighting for justice.
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