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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1996
In your article about Ron Wyden's senatorial win in Oregon (Feb. 1), you quote Republican National Committee Chairman Haley Barbour as claiming the closeness of the election was a testament to "the strength of the conservative ideas [Gordon Smith] espoused." This statement does not square with the facts: Oregon hadn't elected a Democratic senator in nearly 30 years; Smith, a millionaire businessman, outspent Wyden 2 to 1. One could say that for Wyden to even come close, much less win, was instead a testament to the strength of his environmental arguments.
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NATIONAL
October 9, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
Two U.S. senators angered by the firing of whistle-blower Walter Tamosaitis from the contaminated Hanford, Wash., nuclear site sharply criticized the U.S. secretary of Energy on Wednesday.  Tamosaitis, an engineer, had raised safety concerns two years ago about the design of a plant that is intended to turn radioactive waste into glass. After that, San Francisco-based URS Corp. took away his staff and assigned him to a basement office without furniture or a telephone. Last week, Tamosaitis was laid off in what the company called a cost-cutting move.
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NEWS
February 1, 1996 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few days before his election Tuesday as Oregon's new U.S. senator, Ron Wyden was recalling a vote in Congress last year on a plan to open up federal forests to salvage logging of dead and dying trees. Both of Oregon's Republican senators had voted to quash a move by Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) to stop the logging, and her effort, backed by environmentalists, narrowly lost. The result was the first wide-scale logging in Oregon forests in several years.
OPINION
June 11, 2013 | By Hector Villagra
President Obama's response to the troubling news of indiscriminate government collection of communication information was meant to be reassuring: The NSA is operating under supervision by all three branches of government, he assured us. Even if this were true - and it is not - this purported defense should make us more nervous, not less, because it suggests that Washington has become entirely comfortable with keeping basic information from the...
BUSINESS
August 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Genentech Disagrees With Allegations: The South San Francisco-based company, which has become tangled in an extensive federal investigative web, denied charges that it used illegal marketing practices to increase sales of its growth hormone drug Protropin. The comments follow yesterday's announcement by the Food and Drug Administration that it will investigate claims by Rep. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) that Genentech Inc. illegally marketed the drug for off-label, or non-FDA-approved, uses.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - The Senate on Thursday failed to pass bipartisan legislation that would allow states to collect sales taxes from larger Internet retailers, but the bill cleared a key procedural hurdle and is on track for approval after lawmakers return from a recess. Momentum has been building for the Marketplace Fairness Act, which is strongly supported by most state and local governments and traditional brick-and-mortar retailers. But opposition from some online retailers, led by EBay Inc., and a small group of senators largely from states that do not have sales taxes derailed the legislation temporarily.
NATIONAL
October 9, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
Two U.S. senators angered by the firing of whistle-blower Walter Tamosaitis from the contaminated Hanford, Wash., nuclear site sharply criticized the U.S. secretary of Energy on Wednesday.  Tamosaitis, an engineer, had raised safety concerns two years ago about the design of a plant that is intended to turn radioactive waste into glass. After that, San Francisco-based URS Corp. took away his staff and assigned him to a basement office without furniture or a telephone. Last week, Tamosaitis was laid off in what the company called a cost-cutting move.
OPINION
June 11, 2013 | By Hector Villagra
President Obama's response to the troubling news of indiscriminate government collection of communication information was meant to be reassuring: The NSA is operating under supervision by all three branches of government, he assured us. Even if this were true - and it is not - this purported defense should make us more nervous, not less, because it suggests that Washington has become entirely comfortable with keeping basic information from the...
BUSINESS
February 19, 2004 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. senator from Oregon called Wednesday for an investigation into Shell Oil Co.'s plan to close its Bakersfield refinery, saying the move would benefit oil companies and worsen the tight gasoline market that is already causing pump prices to surge in California and the West. In a letter to the chairman of the Federal Trade Commission, Democrat Ron Wyden asked the agency to determine whether Shell's plan to close the refinery Oct.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
Saudi Arabia remains the world's leading source of money for Al Qaeda and other extremist networks and has failed to take key steps requested by U.S. officials to stem the flow, the Bush administration's top financial counter-terrorism official said Tuesday. Stuart A.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - The Senate on Thursday failed to pass bipartisan legislation that would allow states to collect sales taxes from larger Internet retailers, but the bill cleared a key procedural hurdle and is on track for approval after lawmakers return from a recess. Momentum has been building for the Marketplace Fairness Act, which is strongly supported by most state and local governments and traditional brick-and-mortar retailers. But opposition from some online retailers, led by EBay Inc., and a small group of senators largely from states that do not have sales taxes derailed the legislation temporarily.
BUSINESS
February 19, 2004 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. senator from Oregon called Wednesday for an investigation into Shell Oil Co.'s plan to close its Bakersfield refinery, saying the move would benefit oil companies and worsen the tight gasoline market that is already causing pump prices to surge in California and the West. In a letter to the chairman of the Federal Trade Commission, Democrat Ron Wyden asked the agency to determine whether Shell's plan to close the refinery Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1996
In your article about Ron Wyden's senatorial win in Oregon (Feb. 1), you quote Republican National Committee Chairman Haley Barbour as claiming the closeness of the election was a testament to "the strength of the conservative ideas [Gordon Smith] espoused." This statement does not square with the facts: Oregon hadn't elected a Democratic senator in nearly 30 years; Smith, a millionaire businessman, outspent Wyden 2 to 1. One could say that for Wyden to even come close, much less win, was instead a testament to the strength of his environmental arguments.
NEWS
February 1, 1996 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few days before his election Tuesday as Oregon's new U.S. senator, Ron Wyden was recalling a vote in Congress last year on a plan to open up federal forests to salvage logging of dead and dying trees. Both of Oregon's Republican senators had voted to quash a move by Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) to stop the logging, and her effort, backed by environmentalists, narrowly lost. The result was the first wide-scale logging in Oregon forests in several years.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Genentech Disagrees With Allegations: The South San Francisco-based company, which has become tangled in an extensive federal investigative web, denied charges that it used illegal marketing practices to increase sales of its growth hormone drug Protropin. The comments follow yesterday's announcement by the Food and Drug Administration that it will investigate claims by Rep. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) that Genentech Inc. illegally marketed the drug for off-label, or non-FDA-approved, uses.
NEWS
April 14, 1987
Reps. Dan Glickman (D-Kan.) and Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) said they will introduce legislation next week to force food processors to disclose when highly saturated tropical oils are used in their products. Under current law, the lawmakers said, coconut, palm and palm kernel oils are classified as vegetable oils, and food products containing them can carry labels stating they were made with "100% vegetable shortening."
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