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Ronald A Brierley

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BUSINESS
March 31, 1988 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
CalMat, the Los Angeles cement giant, Wednesday rejected as inadequate a $986.2-million, or $40-a-share, offer from its largest shareholder, New Zealand investor Ronald A. Brierley. In a statement, A. Frederick Gerstell, CalMat president and chief executive, seemed to discourage a higher offer. "A sale of CalMat is not in the best interests of our shareholders at this time," he said. But CalMat's shares closed higher Wednesday, indicating that investors expected a bigger bid to emerge.
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BUSINESS
July 21, 1988 | KEITH BRADSHER, Times Staff Writer
New Zealand corporate raider Ronald A. Brierley has reluctantly ended his hostile takeover assault on CalMat, one of Los Angeles' biggest and oldest companies, and agreed to sell his shares to Japan's largest cement maker, spokesmen for all three parties said Wednesday. Brierley will sell his 19% stake to Onoda Cement Co. for $41.75 a share, making the deal worth $242 million.
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BUSINESS
August 10, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
By all accounts, New Zealand financier Ronald A. Brierley is a man in love with his work. The 50-year-old bachelor, so the story goes, must be persuaded to take an annual vacation from the rigors of running his multimillion-dollar investment empire by his staff, who buy Brierley a ticket, book the flight and physically place him in his seat. Even then, Brierley packs a suitcase full of annual reports to study in his hotel room.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1988 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
CalMat, the Los Angeles cement giant, Wednesday rejected as inadequate a $986.2-million, or $40-a-share, offer from its largest shareholder, New Zealand investor Ronald A. Brierley. In a statement, A. Frederick Gerstell, CalMat president and chief executive, seemed to discourage a higher offer. "A sale of CalMat is not in the best interests of our shareholders at this time," he said. But CalMat's shares closed higher Wednesday, indicating that investors expected a bigger bid to emerge.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1988 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
New Zealand investor Ronald A. Brierley broke his truce with cement giant CalMat on Wednesday, offering $40 a share, or about $998 million, to take over the firm. CalMat, based in Los Angeles, said its board would meet soon to consider the offer, and other alternatives that were said to include a financial overhaul or a management buyout. Brierley, who owns 19% of CalMat's shares though his Hong Kong investment firm, Industrial Equity (Pacific) Ltd.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1988 | KEITH BRADSHER, Times Staff Writer
New Zealand corporate raider Ronald A. Brierley has reluctantly ended his hostile takeover assault on CalMat, one of Los Angeles' biggest and oldest companies, and agreed to sell his shares to Japan's largest cement maker, spokesmen for all three parties said Wednesday. Brierley will sell his 19% stake to Onoda Cement Co. for $41.75 a share, making the deal worth $242 million.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1988 | From Reuters
Australian corporate raider Robert Holmes a Court is being raided. Polo-playing publisher Kerry Packer and New Zealand's Ron (the Raider) Brierley on Thursday bid $606 million for the core of Holmes a Court's empire. "It's fascinating to have one entrepreneur taking on another like this," said stock analyst and longtime Holmes a Court watcher Tony Moody of A. C. Goode & Co. "It's all part of the game, and of course, it is a game," he said.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1988 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
CalMat, a big construction material company, said Tuesday that it plans to shed its real estate and cement business in a dramatic move designed to ward off a hostile takeover bid from New Zealand investor Ronald A. Brierley. The company said it expects to receive $800 million from the sale of its cement and real estate, located mostly in Southern California. CalMat will distribute the after-tax proceeds from the sales to shareholders.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1988 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
New Zealand investor Ronald A. Brierley broke his truce with cement giant CalMat on Wednesday, offering $40 a share, or about $998 million, to take over the firm. CalMat, based in Los Angeles, said its board would meet soon to consider the offer, and other alternatives that were said to include a financial overhaul or a management buyout. Brierley, who owns 19% of CalMat's shares though his Hong Kong investment firm, Industrial Equity (Pacific) Ltd.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1988 | From Reuters
Australian corporate raider Robert Holmes a Court is being raided. Polo-playing publisher Kerry Packer and New Zealand's Ron (the Raider) Brierley on Thursday bid $606 million for the core of Holmes a Court's empire. "It's fascinating to have one entrepreneur taking on another like this," said stock analyst and longtime Holmes a Court watcher Tony Moody of A. C. Goode & Co. "It's all part of the game, and of course, it is a game," he said.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
By all accounts, New Zealand financier Ronald A. Brierley is a man in love with his work. The 50-year-old bachelor, so the story goes, must be persuaded to take an annual vacation from the rigors of running his multimillion-dollar investment empire by his staff, who buy Brierley a ticket, book the flight and physically place him in his seat. Even then, Brierley packs a suitcase full of annual reports to study in his hotel room.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1989 | JOHN CHARLES TIGHE, Times Staff Writer
A Hong Kong investment firm offered Thursday to buy Smith International Inc., an oil exploration firm that recently moved its operations from Orange County to Texas and Oklahoma. Industrial Equity Ltd., which is Smith's largest shareholder with about 35% of its stock, did not name the price it is willing to pay. The offer helped push the value of Smith's shares up 20% Thursday, giving the company a market value of $366 million. Smith's shares closed Thursday at $12.875, up $2.125 per share in very heavy trading on the New York Stock Exchange.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Kuwaiti government's investment arm on Monday made its first known sale of a Kuwaiti holding since Iraq's invasion of Kuwait on Aug. 2. The sale was "purely an investment decision" and wasn't aimed at raising cash, said a spokeswoman for the London-based investment arm, the Kuwait Investment Office. She wasn't identified, in accordance with British practice. The investment office sold a 10.1% stake in Mount Charlotte Investments PLC to a company controlled by New Zealand financier Ronald A.
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