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Ronald A Katz

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BUSINESS
November 10, 2000 | Elizabeth Douglass
Telecommunications giant AT&T Corp. agreed to pay a "significant" settlement to a Los Angeles inventor who sued the phone company for using his patented technology in a variety of computerized telephone and call-processing systems. The inventor, Ronald A. Katz, said he is "overjoyed" by the settlement but that he is bound by a confidentiality pact to not disclose the amount and terms of the AT&T agreement.
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BUSINESS
February 8, 1985 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Responding to concerns about the apparently growing problem of securities counterfeiting, a Los Angeles-based firm has developed what is believed to be the first automated system to detect fake stock certificates and other bogus securities. Light Signatures Inc. said Thursday that it is negotiating with stock-transfer agents, brokerage houses and banks for introduction of a high-speed system that "reads" certificates to verify their authenticity and to process data about transactions.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2000 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles entrepreneur Ronald Katz and his nine-employee firm are booking big business with the likes of AT&T, IBM, Microsoft, Sprint and others. He's a supplier, of sorts, even though his tiny company doesn't really make anything. So what does Katz have that those companies need? It all boils down to a collection of computer telephony patents owned by Katz--patents that have been debated and belittled for more than a decade and the subject of lawsuits for nearly as long.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1986 | ALAN GOLDSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
Robert M. Stander likens the situation of his Calabasas Park-based company, Veritec, to that of a snake preparing to devour an elephant. The potential applications for Veritec's anti-counterfeiting technologies are so vast, he contends, that they have to be attacked one bite at a time. "If you take it all in at once, you get sick and die," said Stander, Veritec's president. At this point, Veritec doesn't need to worry about hurting itself by gorging on too much business.
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