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Ronald A Lorenzo

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1993 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Malibu restaurateur Ronald A. Lorenzo, a frequent target of organized crime investigators in recent years, was convicted Friday on federal drug conspiracy charges despite testimony in his behalf by actor James Caan. A U.S. District Court jury found Lorenzo guilty on five counts stemming from two 1990 cocaine deals with a prized FBI informant, Robert Franchi. Franchi spent more than three years secretly recording alleged mob contacts around Los Angeles and New England.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1993 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Malibu restaurateur Ronald A. Lorenzo, a frequent target of organized crime investigators in recent years, was convicted Friday on federal drug conspiracy charges despite testimony in his behalf by actor James Caan. A U.S. District Court jury found Lorenzo guilty on five counts stemming from two 1990 cocaine deals with a prized FBI informant, Robert Franchi. Franchi spent more than three years secretly recording alleged mob contacts around Los Angeles and New England.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1993
James Caan's disparaging remarks regarding Bette Midler--"Bette Midler is very stupid. She's not a bad person, but stupid in terms of gray matter. I mean I like her, but I like my dog too"--demonstrate a clear lack of class and character. His selection of friends (Ronald A. Lorenzo) would seem to bear this out. Or perhaps he's jealous that her stellar career has so overshadowed his. N. D. LAUER Long Beach
MAGAZINE
September 12, 1993 | Jonathan Littman, Jonathan Littman is the author of "Once Upon a Time in Computerland." Cyberpunks can reach him on the Internet at jlittman@well.sf.ca.us
Today is the day!" squealed disc jockey Rick Dees. "This is song number one, 'Escapade,' by Janet Jackson. If it is followed by 'Love Shack' by the B-52's and 'Kiss' by Prince, you could be caller number 102 and win a brand new $50,000 Porsche!" KIIS-FM called it "Win a Porsche by Friday": eight Porsches--about $400,000 worth of steel, leather and status--given away, one a week. You could hardly live or work in Los Angeles without being caught up in the frenzy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1992
The federal drug conspiracy case against reputed mob figure Ronald A. Lorenzo went to the jury Friday after he admitted assisting in the sale of one kilogram of cocaine but insisted he was entrapped by an FBI informant. "He was always bringing up drugs with me," Lorenzo, 46, testified in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, referring to informant Robert Franchi, who secretly recorded numerous meetings with alleged Mafia contacts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1992
A federal judge Monday denied a new drug trial for former Malibu restaurateur Ronald A. Lorenzo, a reputed member of the Bonanno Mafia family. Lorenzo was convicted on a single conspiracy count in October after a two-week trial that featured defense testimony by actor James Caan, who said he was Lorenzo's best friend. U.S. District Judge Dickran Tevrizian denied the motion by defense attorney Gerald V.
MAGAZINE
February 21, 1993 | Paul Lieberman, Times staff writer Paul Lieberman has reported frequently on organized crime, most recently describing efforts to infiltrate Indian gambling.
As a child, Linda Carol fantasized about the people she saw on TV. Growing up south of Boston in a family in which screaming matches were dinner-time fare, she retreated time and again to the tube. "I thought I'd like to go inside there," she says, "and get away from my own life." * At 14, she found a better escape--beauty pageants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1993
Reputed mob figure Ronald A. Lorenzo was sentenced Monday to 11 years in federal prison for helping an FBI informant buy nearly six kilograms of cocaine. Lorenzo, 47, who ran Splash restaurant in Malibu, was convicted at two trials of entering drug deals during 1988 and 1989 with Robert Franchi, who spent several years secretly taping suspected organized crime contacts. The case drew widespread attention when actor James Caan testified as a character witness that Lorenzo was his best friend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1992 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor James Caan testified on Wednesday that his closest friend--an alleged organized-crime figure standing trial on cocaine trafficking charges--was, to his knowledge, a law-abiding citizen. Caan, who gained stardom as the son of a mob chieftain in the 1972 film classic, "The Godfather," testified in U.S. District Court that he has lent the defendant, Ronald A. Lorenzo, thousands of dollars during the course of their friendship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1992 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Malibu restaurateur Ronald A. Lorenzo, long described by law enforcement officials as an organized crime figure but never previously convicted of a crime, was found guilty Thursday on a federal drug conspiracy charge. A Los Angeles jury reached the verdict in its third day of deliberation, unswayed by defense testimony from actor James Caan, who called Lorenzo his best friend, and rejecting Lorenzo's claim that he was entrapped into a cocaine deal by an FBI informant. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1993 | DAVID FREED and CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Actor James Caan, best known for his role as a hot-tempered mobster in the 1972 film "The Godfather," was questioned by Los Angeles police Saturday as a witness to what authorities described as a possible murder. The victim, identified only as a young white man, was found dead early Saturday in the courtyard of an upscale, high-rise apartment on the Westside. Witnesses speculated that the victim may have been shot in the head or fallen to his death. An autopsy was scheduled.
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