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Ronald Asquith

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1987
Ronald Asquith's reply (Letters, May 9) about Occidental Petroleum Corp.'s meatpacking subsidiary, IBP, is wrong! He may be the vice president of employee relations in Los Angeles, but I worked at the Dakota City, Neb., plant for almost two years. I have since moved away because of the lockout by management in December, 1986. Asquith stated that ". . . a substantial number of strikers having returned to work, having accepted IBP's wage package . . ." He did not mention that the reason they returned to work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Delaware judge has ordered Occidental Petroleum Corp. to provide details by Monday on the source of money used to purchase virtually the entire art collection of Occidental Chairman Armand Hammer. In an order made public Wednesday, the judge also authorized lawyers for dissident Occidental shareholders to take depositions from a top Occidental executive and the administrator of the Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center, which is under construction in Westwood.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Occidental Petroleum Corp. on Tuesday denied that it ever attempted to conceal construction costs of a Westwood museum being built to house the art collection of company chairman Armand Hammer. Ronald Asquith, the Occidental vice president in charge of construction of the Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center, said in an affidavit filed in Wilmington, Del., that allegations that Occidental engaged in a scheme to artificially lower the apparent cost of the museum "are false."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Occidental Petroleum Corp. on Tuesday denied that it ever attempted to conceal construction costs of a Westwood museum being built to house the art collection of company chairman Armand Hammer. Ronald Asquith, the Occidental vice president in charge of construction of the Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center, said in an affidavit filed in Wilmington, Del., that allegations that Occidental engaged in a scheme to artificially lower the apparent cost of the museum "are false."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Delaware judge has ordered Occidental Petroleum Corp. to provide details by Monday on the source of money used to purchase virtually the entire art collection of Occidental Chairman Armand Hammer. In an order made public Wednesday, the judge also authorized lawyers for dissident Occidental shareholders to take depositions from a top Occidental executive and the administrator of the Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center, which is under construction in Westwood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1987
On May 2 The Times published a letter by David T. Barry, a Los Angeles official of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union, "Armand Hammer's Meat Plant in Nebraska," in which he provided an erroneous and misleading picture of labor relations within Occidental Petroleum Corp. Occidental is in many businesses: oil exploration and production; chemicals; coal mining; natural gas transmission; and meat processing. We deal with many different labor organizations across the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heavy cost overruns may have caused Occidental Petroleum officials last summer to use accounting devices to switch millions of dollars from the Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center books to other corporate categories. In order to settle a shareholder suit over financing of the center, Occidental had earlier agreed to hold costs for the Westwood facility to $60 million or less. To meet the goal, the oil company had to reduce the price of the museum by $18.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1987
Ronald Asquith's reply (Letters, May 9) about Occidental Petroleum Corp.'s meatpacking subsidiary, IBP, is wrong! He may be the vice president of employee relations in Los Angeles, but I worked at the Dakota City, Neb., plant for almost two years. I have since moved away because of the lockout by management in December, 1986. Asquith stated that ". . . a substantial number of strikers having returned to work, having accepted IBP's wage package . . ." He did not mention that the reason they returned to work.
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