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Ronald Brownstein

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November 4, 2007 | Art Winslow, Art Winslow, a former literary and executive editor of the Nation, writes frequently about books and culture.
TAKE the concept of an hourglass economy, in which the middle is squeezed to near nonexistence, and apply it to politics -- the major parties and the gravitations of the electorate -- and you have approximated our plight as Ronald Brownstein lays it out in "The Second Civil War." Wielding a catchphrase lifted from Ken Mehlman, campaign manager for George W.
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OPINION
July 23, 2008
Re "The jokes are on Obama," and "We deserve better than this," Opinion, July 18 On the same page that Joel Stein offers lame suggestions for Obama jokes, Ronald Brownstein asks for more substantive coverage of the 2008 presidential race. I submit that people find few things to laugh about these days, with the Bush administration providing all the absurdity we can stomach and Congress criminally unresponsive to the needs of the people. Would I like to laugh? You bet. Do I want to be entertained?
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BOOKS
January 13, 1991 | Victor Navasky, Navasky is the editor of the Nation and the author of "Naming Names," which Penguin will republish in February
If you are lucky enough to get Ron Brownstein as your tour guide on the yellow brick road that leads from Washington to Hollywood, you will learn early on that the interaction between the city of power and the city of glamour, as Brownstein dubs them in "The Power and the Glitter: The Hollywood-Washington Connection" isn't what it used to be. In days of yore, legitimacy-by-association was the name of the game for a first generation of Jewish moguls. Louis B.
OPINION
July 10, 2008
Re "Run locally, win nationally," Opinion, July 4 John McCain and Barack Obama deserve credit, as Ronald Brownstein says, for their efforts to reach out and listen to both red and blue states. At least the next president's "resolve" won't require 24/7 protection from inconvenient facts, dissent or thinking. But Brownstein should have given some credit to Democratic National Committee Chairman Howard Dean. Dean's "50-state strategy" has earned him a lot of flak. It may or may not be in the short-term interest of his party, but it is clearly in the long-term interest of the United States.
NATIONAL
November 22, 2004
Ronald Brownstein is on vacation. See past Washington Outlook columns on The Times' website at www.latimes.com/brownstein.
MAGAZINE
January 31, 1988
I thought "The New Status Seekers" (by Ronald Brownstein and Nina J. Easton, Dec. 27, 1987 / Jan. 3, 1988) was disgusting. I read every word of it. GARY WEXLER North Hollywood
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2006
RE "Taking a Look at Bush With Stars in His Eyes," by Ronald Brownstein, Jan. 31: Although the book "Rebel-in-Chief," Fred Barnes' love letter to President Bush, will probably be required history reading at Bob Jones University, Oprah should be warned that it's a work of fiction. PHYLLIS LANDIS Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998
The Times is "arguably" one of the country's best newspapers. But is that a reason for reporters Ralph Vartabedian, George Skelton and Ronald Brownstein all to use the word "arguably" in the Jan. 5 issue? After that I stopped counting. I won't argue if you would possibly, perhaps permanently, retire "arguably." JAN HABERMAN Los Angeles
OPINION
April 6, 2005
Ronald Brownstein, in his April 4 Washington Outlook column, "Democrats Are Lost in the Shuffle While GOP Holds All the Cards," refers several times to some of the Democrat Party's leading thinkers. As long as the Democrats continue to embrace the myth of gun control as crime control, a very good case can be made that the Democrats have no leading thinkers. Jerry Parsons Long Beach
OPINION
October 9, 2005
Re "Healthcare Crisis Goes Untreated, but the Cancer Is Spreading," column, Oct. 3 Ronald Brownstein's "improvements" would shift more healthcare costs to taxpayers but would do nothing to reduce the total cost. The real solution is well known and is already working in the more civilized, secular, industrial democracies of the world. It is the single-payer healthcare system operated by the national government and largely insulated from politics. GEORGE TUCKER Redondo Beach
OPINION
March 27, 2008
Re "The Democrats flunk free trade," Opinion, March 21 Ronald Brownstein holds up the heavily Democratic cities of New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Miami as cities whose vibrant economies are based on "free trade." He misses the fact that sleek buildings are not an indication of the condition of the economy. What has happened to wages, benefits and the disintegration of manufacturing since the advent of free trade? Free trade from substandard nations with 19th century economic philosophies is anything but free.
BOOKS
November 4, 2007 | Art Winslow, Art Winslow, a former literary and executive editor of the Nation, writes frequently about books and culture.
TAKE the concept of an hourglass economy, in which the middle is squeezed to near nonexistence, and apply it to politics -- the major parties and the gravitations of the electorate -- and you have approximated our plight as Ronald Brownstein lays it out in "The Second Civil War." Wielding a catchphrase lifted from Ken Mehlman, campaign manager for George W.
OPINION
July 11, 2007 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
THE COMPLAINTS are reaching a crescendo as Congress moves closer to reauthorizing No Child Left Behind, the education reform law that President Bush passed with rare bipartisan support in 2001. Conservatives are wailing about federal intrusion. Teachers unions and some leading Democrats moan that the law relies too much on testing as the measure of student progress. And some parents echo each of those indictments. There's no doubt the law has minted enemies.
OPINION
July 4, 2007 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
HIS APPROVAL rating has cratered. His legislative agenda, after the collapse of immigration reform, is in ruins. So many longtime aides have departed that he may need name tags for Oval Office meetings. And yet with his decision to spare I. Lewis Libby from prison, President Bush sent his critics a clear signal that he will not concede an inch of ground that they lack the strength and determination to take from him.
OPINION
June 26, 2007
Re "What Pelosi can learn from Newt," Opinion, June 20 Ronald Brownstein touts the importance of loyalty to political leaders in the smooth operation of government. Brownstein is absolutely correct -- if all you care about is operational efficiency and efficacy. After all, the Baath Party did do a better job of controlling sectarian violence in Iraq, trains ran on time under Benito Mussolini and Stalin could control the ethnic factions of the former Soviet Union. Nothing works better than political dictatorship for strengthening the power of the few and avoiding the messiness of true democracy.
OPINION
May 18, 2007
Re "Blair knew better," Opinion, and "Blair blew the 'special relationship,' " Opinion, May 16 In bemoaning the legacy of British Prime Minister Tony Blair, Ronald Brownstein and Ian Kershaw ironically lend support to President Bush's and Blair's decision to oust Saddam Hussein without the support of the international community. Brownstein cites the importance of the United Nations in the Balkans, and Kershaw points to Kosovo in 1999 -- merely two examples of that august body's fecklessness, as exemplified later in restraining Hussein's blatant defiance of that body, only to be encouraged by rampant corruption in the oil-for-food program.
MAGAZINE
July 8, 1990
I can tell that Pete Wilson does have a heart ("RoboPol," by Ronald Brownstein, May 13). I doubt I'd vote for him, because any Democrat is bound to address my concerns--education, medical care for the needy, controlled growth, et cetera--better than any Republican. Still, I admire him for the seemingly incorruptible stubborn conscience he votes with. MARILYN SEFF San Diego
OPINION
January 5, 2002
Re "Americans' Reaction to Attacks Shows True State of the Union," Dec. 31: Ronald Brownstein got it right when he stated: "What unites America turns out to be much more profound than what divides it." And what unites America is liberty. Abraham Lincoln said it best: "The essence of liberty is the spirit of liberty; everywhere." Everywhere. That's it. Liberty. It's that simple. Christopher Pearson Spring Valley
OPINION
May 13, 2007
Re "Preparation, inspiration, aspiration," Opinion, May 9 With apologies to Abraham Lincoln, Ronald Brownstein is right. Very little that was said, in either presidential debate, will be remembered. With that thought in mind, wouldn't it be memorable if Al Gore attended the next Democratic debate? Not as a contender but as the moderator. If the topic happens to be the environment, Gore will be the perfect host. The former vice president can help give life to what's largely been avoided to date -- a thoughtful, thorough conversation about energy independence, greenhouse gases, nuclear power, carbon footprints and how each will affect the next president's decision-making.
OPINION
April 13, 2007
Re "Collision course for coal," Opinion, April 11 The staggering greenhouse gas numbers that Ronald Brownstein mentions for electricity generated by burning coal -- four-fifths of all carbon from electrical power generation and one-third of all U.S. carbon emissions -- would seem to render coal moot as a power source. Zero carbon for electrical grids is only available from nuclear power. Massive fields of wind turbines have multiple sets of problems; solar, while promising, is far more cost effective decentralized than as a primary source of grid power.
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