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Ronald Busuttil

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NEWS
November 21, 1994
Rock musician David Crosby was in critical but stable condition Sunday after undergoing a seven-hour liver transplant operation, said a spokesman for UCLA Medical Center. "I was pleased with the way Mr. Crosby's surgery proceeded," said Dr. Ronald W. Busuttil, director of the Dumont-UCLA Liver Transplant Center and Crosby's surgeon. "As with all transplant patients, we will watch his progress closely for several days and I am optimistic that he will do well," Busuttil said.
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MAGAZINE
July 11, 1999 | SCOTT HARRIS, Scott Harris last wrote for the magazine about one man's struggle with Lou Gehrig's disease
To the unschooled eye, a healthy human liver is neither particularly ugly nor appealing. Brownish-red inside the body, it pales to a pinkish-purple once a surgeon cuts off the blood flow and removes it. You might mistake the liver for a lady's evening bag if it didn't glisten like something from the butcher's case. No other organ is so taken for granted.
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MAGAZINE
July 11, 1999 | SCOTT HARRIS, Scott Harris last wrote for the magazine about one man's struggle with Lou Gehrig's disease
To the unschooled eye, a healthy human liver is neither particularly ugly nor appealing. Brownish-red inside the body, it pales to a pinkish-purple once a surgeon cuts off the blood flow and removes it. You might mistake the liver for a lady's evening bag if it didn't glisten like something from the butcher's case. No other organ is so taken for granted.
HEALTH
July 20, 2009 | Jill U. Adams
That longtime staple of medicine cabinets, acetaminophen, appears to be under fire. Used to treat headaches, muscle aches and seemingly every other ache Americans have, the drug -- found most notably in the brand name pain reliever Tylenol -- has recently been called a potential danger to the millions of people who take it. But the drug itself hasn't changed. Nor have the number of problems associated with it. The only new element is public attention to its risks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2008 | John M. Glionna and Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writers
UCLA Medical Center and its most accomplished liver surgeon provided a life-saving transplant to one of Japan's most powerful gang bosses, law enforcement sources told The Times. In addition, the surgeon performed liver transplants at UCLA on three other men who are now barred from entering the United States because of their criminal records or suspected affiliation with Japanese organized crime groups, said a knowledgeable law enforcement official who spoke on condition of anonymity.
MAGAZINE
August 15, 1999
Hats off to Scott Harris for a well-informed article about Dr. Ronald Busuttil, a man to be praised and admired for his work in a medical field dear to my heart--and liver ("God's Right Hand," July 11). As a grateful recipient of a donor liver at UCLA Medical Center last April, I'm feeling good and have a new lease on life. (I also have a soul mate, an infant, with whom I share my donor liver. While Dr. Busuttil operated on the baby, Dr. Mark Ghobrial "installed" my liver.) The economics of organ supply and demand are cruel, giving life to some and denying it to others.
MAGAZINE
August 8, 1999
As a species, we are capable of a wide spectrum of behavior--from the most atrocious cruelties to our fellow man to absolute beauty that realizes our loftiest potential--the latter being epitomized in your recent article about Dr. Ronald Busuttil ("God's Right Hand," by Scott Harris, July 11). What a complete human being he is, and what an inspiration to all of us to fulfill and use the gifts we've been given. We are bombarded daily with stories of unspeakable horrors happening the world over, and it is a breath of fresh air to read about the difference one individual can make.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1993 | from Associated Press
A woman and her fetus were doing well Friday as she recuperated from a liver transplant at UCLA Medical Center, a surgery that doctors said has rarely been performed on a pregnant patient. Paula Severseike, who is 20 weeks pregnant, is believed to be only the fourth woman to undergo liver transplant surgery during pregnancy. The surgery, which lasted five hours, was performed July 1, said Dr. Ronald Busuttil, director of UCLA's liver transplant program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1987
UCLA Medical Center surgeons early Tuesday implanted a second liver into Alexander Tufel, the 16-month-old Seattle child who had only a few days to live unless a new liver was found for him. "The operation went very well. We're optimistic that he will be OK," said Dr. Ronald Busuttil, director of UCLA's liver transplant program. Alexander showed a marked improvement in color and vital signs within three hours of completion of the operation, Busuttil said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1996
Re "New Liver Transplant Rule Worries Patients, Surgeons," Nov. 16: Our daughter had a liver transplant seven years ago at UCLA. She received a transplant too late and incurred serious brain injury, leaving her unable to walk or talk, and with abilities of a 2-month-old. She was moved down the priority list when a child next to her in the hospital rejected his second liver. He died with a third transplant. Had this ruling been in effect then, the other child probably would have been passed over and the liver given to our daughter.
NEWS
April 6, 1988
The UC San Diego Medical Center put its unsuccessful liver transplant program on indefinite hold while outside experts try to figure out why all four of the program's patients died. A medical center spokesman said two liver transplant experts have been asked to review the hospital's program. One of the outside experts reportedly is from the UCLA Medical Center, which has a successful liver transplant program. Dr. Ronald W.
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