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Ronald Coase

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Ronald Coase, a British-born University of Chicago economist whose Nobel Prize-winning work on the role of corporations stemmed from visits in the early 1930s to American companies including Ford Motor Co. and Union Carbide Corp., has died. He was 102. Coase, who had been the oldest living Nobel laureate, died Monday at St. Joseph Hospital in Chicago, the university announced. No cause was given. The Royal Swedish Academy of Science awarded Coase the 1991 Nobel in economics "for his discovery and clarification of the significance of transaction costs and property rights for the institutional structure and functioning of the economy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Ronald Coase, a British-born University of Chicago economist whose Nobel Prize-winning work on the role of corporations stemmed from visits in the early 1930s to American companies including Ford Motor Co. and Union Carbide Corp., has died. He was 102. Coase, who had been the oldest living Nobel laureate, died Monday at St. Joseph Hospital in Chicago, the university announced. No cause was given. The Royal Swedish Academy of Science awarded Coase the 1991 Nobel in economics "for his discovery and clarification of the significance of transaction costs and property rights for the institutional structure and functioning of the economy.
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BUSINESS
October 16, 1991 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An 81-year-old economist from the University of Chicago, whose Depression-era tour of American factories led him to discover that it costs money to bargain over any transaction, was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics on Tuesday. The theories developed by British-born Ronald Coase, a professor emeritus at the university's law school, were described by the Nobel committee as the economic equivalent of discovering new particles of matter.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1991 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An 81-year-old economist from the University of Chicago, whose Depression-era tour of American factories led him to discover that it costs money to bargain over any transaction, was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics on Tuesday. The theories developed by British-born Ronald Coase, a professor emeritus at the university's law school, were described by the Nobel committee as the economic equivalent of discovering new particles of matter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Aaron Director, a University of Chicago scholar who influenced scores of legal minds through his work joining the fields of law and economics, has died. He was 102. Director died Saturday at his retirement home in Los Altos Hills, Calif., the university announced Monday. The cause of death was not reported. A passionate defender of free markets, Director was among the first U.S. scholars to apply the principles of economics to legal reasoning.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1995
Robert E. Lucas Jr. joins a long line of University of Chicago economics professors to win the Nobel Memorial Prize. Lucas won for his theory on how ordinary people's expectations can influence economic policies. Lucas' Insights * Rational expectations: Consumers and businesses rely on experience and information about the future to make their own economic decisions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1997 | JAMES L. DOTI, James L. Doti is the president of Chapman University. He writes from Orange
In a trip to Russia last year, I had the opportunity to meet with a number of Russian officials who were very candid about the problems and prospects facing their country. I found it ironic that most of my meetings took place in the Smolney Institute, the same building in St. Petersburg that Lenin used in 1917 as an outpost for the revolution and first Soviet government.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1992 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1992 Nobel Prize for economics has been awarded to Gary S. Becker, a University of Chicago professor who has used economic theory as a key to explore riddles about families, the work force, crime, discrimination and other social issues, the Swedish Academy of Sciences announced Tuesday. Becker, a professor of economics and sociology whose work was once shunned by the academic Establishment, was awarded the $1.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's first auction in rights to emit air pollution brought more bidders to the table than expected. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Chicago Board of Trade announced Tuesday that 171 bids--from electric utilities, brokerage firms, environmental groups and private investors--competed for more than 150,000 allowances that were sold by sealed bid, bringing in $21 million. Each allowance permits utilities to emit one ton of sulfur dioxide over one year.
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February 1, 2004 | Peter G. Gosselin, Peter G. Gosselin is a Times national economics correspondent based in Washington, D.C.
At any given time, there is a dominant line of argument about the great issues that face America. When it comes to the economy, that line is most often delivered by Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan.
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