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March 7, 1998 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is one thing to fantasize about playing on a dream team, and quite another to actually enter the lineup. That's the situation in which Ronald Copes found himself when he joined the legendary Juilliard String Quartet last summer. Founded in 1946, the Juilliard--due here Sunday for a concert at Caltech--transformed an often aloof and patrician genre into something smart, hip, edgy, distinctively American and surprisingly popular.
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October 31, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
While driving to Aliso Viejo on Tuesday to hear the Juilliard String Quartet play Bach, Schubert and a young American composer, Jesse Jones, at the Soka Performing Arts Center, I listened to a little early Bob Dylan. It seemed right. But so might have Leonard Bernstein, Glenn Gould, something from Stravinsky's Los Angeles years or Aaron Copland. Anything by Miles Davis or Thelonious Monk would have been equally suitable. All were artists on Columbia Records, and in the '40s, '50s and '60s, all were showing the extraordinary originality of North American music.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
While driving to Aliso Viejo on Tuesday to hear the Juilliard String Quartet play Bach, Schubert and a young American composer, Jesse Jones, at the Soka Performing Arts Center, I listened to a little early Bob Dylan. It seemed right. But so might have Leonard Bernstein, Glenn Gould, something from Stravinsky's Los Angeles years or Aaron Copland. Anything by Miles Davis or Thelonious Monk would have been equally suitable. All were artists on Columbia Records, and in the '40s, '50s and '60s, all were showing the extraordinary originality of North American music.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1998 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It is one thing to fantasize about playing on a dream team, and quite another to actually enter the lineup. That's the situation in which Ronald Copes found himself when he joined the legendary Juilliard String Quartet last summer. Founded in 1946, the Juilliard--due here Sunday for a concert at Caltech--transformed an often aloof and patrician genre into something smart, hip, edgy, distinctively American and surprisingly popular.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1985
the Los Angeles Piano Quartet--pianist James Bonn, violinist Clayton Haslop, violist Ronald Copes and cellist Peter Rejto--will replace the Stuttgart Piano Trio at the Coleman Chamber Music Assn. concert, April 21 at 3:30 p.m. The German ensemble has canceled its entire North American tour. The new program, to be heard in Beckman Auditorium at Caltech, will list Beethoven's Piano Quartet in E-flat, Opus 16, the Quartet for piano and strings by Aaron Copland and Brahms' Piano Quartet, Opus 25.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1988 | TERRY McQUILKIN
Unflagging energy and soulful intensity characterized the performances in Smothers Theatre at Pepperdine University, Malibu, where the California Chamber Virtuosi closed its current series Saturday evening. Five musicians brought unusual excitement to Schumann's Piano Quintet, maximizing the score's inherent drama and suffusing it with tension. Though providing a sense of momentum, this unyielding tension proved fatiguing; one wished for moments of lighter, more subtle playing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2006 | Richard S. Ginell
Michelle Makarski: "To Be Sung on the Water" Michelle Makarski, violin. Ronald Copes, viola. (ECM New Series) *** MAKARSKI likes concept albums, and this latest seems really farfetched on paper, juxtaposing as it does three of Tartini's "piccole sonate" for solo violin with contemporary works written for Makarski by USC's Donald Crockett. But in what will not come as a surprise to aficionados, the sequence turns out to be uncanny.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2003 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
The Juilliard String Quartet is such an eminent and familiar ensemble that musically the players must be given the benefit of the doubt. But in terms of sound, something was very wrong about their three-part program Wednesday at the recently refurbished Bovard Auditorium at USC. Violinists Joel Smirnoff and Ronald Copes, violist Samuel Rhodes and cellist Joel Krosnick played in front of a red velvet curtain used to create a more intimate-sized stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1999 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Juilliard String Quartet, in any of its incarnations, has never shied from challenge. Saturday it outdid itself in that regard, offering its Carpenter Performing Arts Center audience a demanding agenda of weighty and surpassingly serious works by Mozart, Schoenberg and Beethoven. Confronted with a typically mechanistic analysis of one of his works, Schoenberg once plaintively exclaimed, "But where are the tunes?"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1988 | HERBERT GLASS
It is heartening to be able to acknowledge as our own a chamber group of such lofty achievement as the Los Angeles Piano Quartet, to fill the slot vacated by the demise of the lamented Sequoia String Quartet. It is heartening, too, that the local boys are being engaged by major local presenters, as witness Tuesday's concert before a sizable audience at Ambassador Auditorium and an upcoming appearance for the Music Guild.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
The music that Jascha Heifetz championed as a performer was widely varied stylistically, and the violinist's taste was no less eclectic in the voluminous material he chose for transcription and arrangement. Chamber Music/LA this year is a Heifetz tribute. The center of the central concert Sunday afternoon at Japan America Theatre offered five unpublished additions to the canon of Heifetz adaptations, in performances by two of the master's protegees.
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