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Ronald Dahl

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HEALTH
September 29, 1997 | THE WASHINGTON POST
Scientists still know very little about what sleep really is, or what it accomplishes on a molecular level. Researchers reported in June that sleep helps rid the brain of a chemical called adenosine that builds up during wakeful hours, but no one knows why adenosine must be eliminated, or what other brain chemicals may contribute to the subjective feelings of sleepiness or mental exhaustion. How much sleep is enough? The answer varies from person to person.
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NEWS
October 25, 1995 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER
Parents sometimes confuse night terrors with nightmares, but the two experiences have little in common. Night terrors are rarer, occurring in about 5% of children under 6. The child screams and thrashes about, but rarely wakes up and does not remember the event when he awakens. Most night terrors are brief, lasting seconds or just minutes, but some can last as long as 30 minutes. Children may have several in a week or in a single night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1989 | PATRICIA KLEIN LERNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Los Angeles police officers, who reportedly had been given joking instructions by a judge to bring a public defender before him in pieces, allegedly dragged the protesting attorney out of a hearing before another judge Monday and hurled him through a courtroom door, bruising his leg. The incident in Van Nuys Superior Court sparked an immediate hearing by the second judge into the possibility of bringing contempt of court charges against the officers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2003 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
Unlike many other newspaper articles, this one admits upfront that it reeks of boredom. Fortunately, boredom has a scintillating side. In addition to being the official personality provider for Al Gore and Gray Davis, it helps keep the U.S. economy afloat and sometimes causes arctic explorers to dress like women. However, experts say boredom is wreaking havoc on society, fueling everything from extramarital affairs and drug addiction to coronaries and car accidents.
HEALTH
September 29, 1997 | RICK WEISS, THE WASHINGTON POST
Aarthi Belani still shudders when she recalls dragging herself out of bed each morning during her junior year of high school two years ago in Edina, Minn. The 17-year-old, who will be a freshman at Stanford University this fall, would set her alarm clock for 6:30 a.m., the latest possible time that would allow her to shower and run off to school in the cold and dark with no time for breakfast and her hair still wet. School started at 7:20 a.m.
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