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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2013 | Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Ronald M. George, the California Chief Justice who wrote the historic 2008 ruling that gave same-sex couples the right to marry, is now retired. He was on a conference call Tuesday  morning about efforts to reform California's initiative process and did not now how the arguments had gone until noon. “It's been in the back of my mind,” said George, 73, a moderate Republican who retired from the court on Jan. 1, 2010. “This is something I could see coming back in 2004.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - When Ronald M. George served as chief justice of California, he pleaded annually with legislators for money to run the courts, warning the loss of funds would compromise justice. But he said he learned that some lawmakers took positions on the budget for purely personal reasons, obsessively discussing their divorces or traffic tickets and punishing the judiciary for rulings they did not like. "I remember dealing with one state senator who found it impossible … not to bring up his own divorce proceedings and how he thought he'd gotten a raw deal at the hands of his wife and her attorneys and didn't feel the court system dealt with him fairly," George said, not naming the elected official.
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NEWS
January 12, 1999 | PATT MORRISON
When it comes to filling the hundreds of appointed state posts, the soundest advice that new governor Gray Davis said he got was to make haste slowly. So: Davis axed 134 names from the midnight-hour appointments made by outgoing Gov. Pete Wilson. Among them was the name of Barbara George, heading for another term on the California Arts Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2013 | Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Ronald M. George, the California Chief Justice who wrote the historic 2008 ruling that gave same-sex couples the right to marry, is now retired. He was on a conference call Tuesday  morning about efforts to reform California's initiative process and did not now how the arguments had gone until noon. “It's been in the back of my mind,” said George, 73, a moderate Republican who retired from the court on Jan. 1, 2010. “This is something I could see coming back in 2004.
NEWS
July 31, 1991 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson praised his new Supreme Court nominee Tuesday but said it will take stronger crime laws, not just tougher judges, to help make Californians feel safe from crime. In a speech before the California District Attorney's Assn., the governor lobbied for his new crime package, which includes tougher sentences for rapists and drug pushers who sell their goods to pregnant women and children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1997
Re "Fighting for a People's Court," Oct. 29: Your profile of Chief Justice Ronald George dealt superficially with his outrageous decision in American Academy of Pediatrics vs. Lungren, the parental consent case. Judicial activism is not courageous, and George's decision is not "legally conservative." It represents a usurpation of legislative prerogative (overturning a statute passed by substantial majorities in a Democrat-controlled Legislature), a disregard for precedent (ignoring nine decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court upholding laws similar to the California statute under review)
NEWS
August 8, 1991
I was disappointed to read of Gov. Pete Wilson's appointment of Appellate Justice Ronald George to replace Allen Broussard on the California Supreme Court (front page, July 30). Notwithstanding George's impressive credentials, I think it most important, given the extreme racial polarization of our society, to have a minority presence on the court. Having said that, I would also admonish liberals and civil rights groups to be careful not to outsmart themselves in their use of political rhetoric.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2006 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
The California Supreme Court appeared dubious Tuesday that a former writers' assistant for the television show "Friends" suffered sexual harassment because of raunchy, sexual comments the show's writers made while producing scripts. During a hearing in Sacramento, two of the state high court's justices observed that Amaani Lyle, 32, was warned before she was hired for "Friends" that she would be subjected to sexually explicit talk in the writers' room. Warner Bros. Television Productions Inc.
OPINION
July 24, 2010 | Patt Morrison
Free the Supreme Court One! Oh wait — he did it himself. Ronald M. George, California's chief justice for 14 years, says happy trails — and trials — to the state high court in December. He really will spend more time with his family — wife Barbara, sons and grandchildren — and good books instead of court paperwork. People inside the court system may say George's legacy is his top-to-bottom administrative overhaul of California's courts. The rest of us might cite his deciding vote that briefly cleared the legal path for same-sex marriage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2010 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Faced with the self-assigned task of writing the California Supreme Court's first ruling on gay marriage, Chief Justice Ronald M. George drafted an opinion in early 2008 with two different endings. One gave same-sex couples the right to marry. The other didn't. Then he asked the six associate justices for reaction. FOR THE RECORD: Ronald George: An article in the Dec. 30 Section A about retiring Chief Justice Ronald M. George of the California Supreme Court incorrectly referred to the "late" Sargent Shriver.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2010
Same-sex marriage: George wrote the 6-1 decision in May 2009 to uphold Proposition 8, rejecting an argument that same-sex marriage could not be abolished by a constitutional amendment. A federal appeals court is now considering a challenge to the 2008 ballot measure. Same-sex marriage: George was the tie-breaker in the 4-3 decision in May 2008 to overturn a ban on same-sex marriage as a violation of the state Constitution. The decision, written by George, was a bold surprise from the Republican-dominated court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2010 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Faced with the self-assigned task of writing the California Supreme Court's first ruling on gay marriage, Chief Justice Ronald M. George drafted an opinion in early 2008 with two different endings. One gave same-sex couples the right to marry. The other didn't. Then he asked the six associate justices for reaction. FOR THE RECORD: Ronald George: An article in the Dec. 30 Section A about retiring Chief Justice Ronald M. George of the California Supreme Court incorrectly referred to the "late" Sargent Shriver.
OPINION
July 24, 2010 | Patt Morrison
Free the Supreme Court One! Oh wait — he did it himself. Ronald M. George, California's chief justice for 14 years, says happy trails — and trials — to the state high court in December. He really will spend more time with his family — wife Barbara, sons and grandchildren — and good books instead of court paperwork. People inside the court system may say George's legacy is his top-to-bottom administrative overhaul of California's courts. The rest of us might cite his deciding vote that briefly cleared the legal path for same-sex marriage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2010 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
California Chief Justice Ronald M. George, who presided over the often turbulent restructuring of state courts and wrote the ruling that temporarily gave gays the right to marry, said Wednesday he would step down in January after a 38-year career in the California court system. George, 70, a moderate Republican who was often the swing vote on the state high court, said he wants to retire while he is "in the prime of physical and mental health." George's decision stunned his colleagues at the court when he informed them Wednesday during a closed, sometimes tearful meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2008 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
In the days leading up to the California Supreme Court's historic same-sex marriage ruling Thursday, the decision "weighed most heavily" on Chief Justice Ronald M. George -- more so, he said, than any previous case in his nearly 17 years on the court. The court was poised 4 to 3 not only to legalize same-sex marriage but also to extend to sexual orientation the same broad protections against bias previously saved for race, gender and religion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2007 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
When California Chief Justice Ronald M. George intervened in the search process for a dean for the new law school at UC Irvine, critics questioned the court's involvement. But legal scholars said last week that it is neither unusual nor unethical for high court judges to weigh in on candidates for public law schools, particularly when their views are sought. The Times reported Sept.
OPINION
July 21, 1996 | Molly Selvin, Molly Selvin is an editorial writer for The Times
The aura of serenity that surrounds Chief Justice Ronald M. George is deceptive. Since he took over the California Supreme Court in May, following the retirement of former Chief Justice Malcolm Lucas, the amiable George has been a whirlwind of activity. The state Judicial Council, which he now chairs, has imposed controversial new limits on the use of cameras in the courtroom and is considering a series of changes in the conduct of jury trials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2006 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
Ten years after Chief Justice Ronald M. George became head of California's courts and dramatically transformed the state's judicial branch, many Los Angeles judges remain resentful of their loss of power and control. Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer, a Democrat, calls the Republican George "the best chief justice in California history." Some judges in Los Angeles have another name for him: "King George."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2004
Ronald M. George, chief justice of California, told the State Bar of California in Monterey on Saturday, Oct. 9 that the judicial branch still faces budget challenges, but that a new change in the process gives courts greater independence and stability. In his "State of the Judiciary" address, George praised judges and lawyers as "committed guardians of the rule of law and of the rights of all Californians." Excerpts from his talk: This year began with uncertainty for much of state government.
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