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Ronald H Brown

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June 27, 1994 | RON HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accompanied by a delegation of U.S. corporate leaders, Secretary of Commerce Ronald H. Brown kicked off a five-city, three-country Latin trade mission Sunday by bringing American and Brazilian business people together in a series of meetings. Brown, whose 22-member delegation includes the heads of such Fortune 500 companies as MCI, Hughes Aircraft, UNISYS Corp. and Comstat, also met in a closed-door session with ranking Brazilian officials and Raytheon President Dennis J.
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NEWS
March 24, 1998 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An indicted former confidant of Ronald H. Brown swears that the late Commerce secretary told her the White House had directed that the agency's trade missions be used to solicit 1996 campaign contributions from those taking the trips. According to documents released Monday, Nolanda S. Hill, the confidant and onetime Brown business associate, also quoted Brown as complaining that White House officials "instructed him" to delay production of subpoenaed records that might reflect this scheme.
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NEWS
December 19, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
NAACP President Kweisi Mfume has asked the Clinton administration for information about a military pathologist's claim that Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown may have been shot in the head, the organization said in a statement. Government investigators conclude that Brown died of injuries he sustained in an April 1996 plane crash in Croatia. Lt. Col.
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | From Associated Press
Responding to questions from several black leaders, the Justice Department said Thursday that it has found no evidence of any crime in connection with Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown's death. An Air Force pathologist's statement that a circular wound on Brown's head resembled a gunshot injury, based on photos and X-rays, has raised concerns among some black leaders.
NEWS
July 6, 1992 | From Times staff writers
JOB JOCKEYING: While most Democrats concentrate on the November election, some insiders are gearing up for the race to replace Ronald H. Brown as party chairman this winter. . . . Those testing the waters include Tony Coelho, the former House member from Merced; Donald R. Sweitzer, a political operative with union ties; Ed Simms, chairman of the Georgia Democratic Party; and James Ruvolo, ex-Ohio party chairman. . . .
NEWS
January 24, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The chairman of the House Government Reform and Oversight Committee asked Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown to provide "complete information" about a promissory note to a firm that Brown formerly co-owned. The note was owed by Corridor Broadcasting Corp., a firm owned by Nolanda Hill, to First International Communications Corp., the company formerly owned by Brown and Hill. Rep. William F. Clinger (R-Pa.
NEWS
January 15, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown's ex-business partner paid $190,000 of Brown's personal debts last year, including legal bills, lines of credit and mortgages, the Washington Post reported. Nolanda Hill, Brown's former partner in First International Communications Corp., paid those debts in June, July and August of 1994, the newspaper reported.
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | Jerry Gillam
Assembly Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco), the Rev. Jesse Jackson's national campaign chairman, insisted on Tuesday that his role has not been diminished by the presidential candidate's selection of attorney Ronald H. Brown of Washington as convention manager. Speaker Brown said he recommended that Jackson choose the other Brown, a "good, close friend," to coordinate convention housekeeping activities from July 18-21 in Atlanta.
NEWS
December 7, 1988
Ronald H. Brown, the Rev. Jesse Jackson's chief operative at last summer's Democratic convention, entered the race for chairman of the party with a declaration that he was seeking the office as "my own man." Brown, who also worked on the presidential campaigns of Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, Walter F. Mondale and Gov. Michael S. Dukakis, said at a Washington press conference he was an "independent, mainstream progressive Democrat" independent of Jackson or any other party leader.
NEWS
June 3, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Air Force is expected to discipline more officials in the fallout of the air crash in Croatia that killed Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown and 34 others in April, Time magazine reported. "There will be other officers disciplined, both higher and lower," a general was quoted as telling the newsmagazine in its latest edition.
NEWS
December 25, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some African American leaders are asking the government to look into a new conspiracy theory--that the late Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown was murdered last year and his government plane was crashed in Croatia to cover it up.
NEWS
December 19, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
NAACP President Kweisi Mfume has asked the Clinton administration for information about a military pathologist's claim that Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown may have been shot in the head, the organization said in a statement. Government investigators conclude that Brown died of injuries he sustained in an April 1996 plane crash in Croatia. Lt. Col.
NEWS
November 22, 1997 | From Associated Press
A federal judge sentenced the son of the late Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown to three years' probation and fined him $5,000 Friday for making an illegal contribution to a Senate campaign. Michael A. Brown, 32, a Washington lawyer, admitted giving $2,000 to his secretary and $1,000 apiece to two co-workers to donate to the 1994 reelection campaign of Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.). U.S.
NEWS
June 30, 1997 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In cinematic terms, it may well have been the prequel to the epic 1996 Democratic fund-raising debacle. Foreshadowing key elements of last year's campaign-finance controversy, then-Democratic National Committee Chairman Ronald H. Brown and a coterie of Asian American activists--individuals who now are central to federal investigations of foreign campaign contributions--traveled to Taiwan, Hong Kong and Hawaii in late 1991.
NEWS
August 7, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Air Force announced Tuesday that it has meted out punishments to 16 officers, including formal reprimands to a general and a colonel, for dereliction of duty in connection with the April 3 plane crash in Croatia that killed Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown. The move, ordered by Gen. Michael Ryan, commander of U.S.
NEWS
July 16, 1996 | Reuters
The Air Force said Monday it will punish additional military officers in connection with the April 3 plane crash in Croatia that killed Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown and 34 other people. The numbers and identities of the officers were not announced. Officials said the punishments did not involve criminal charges, although they could range from courts-martial to letters of reprimand.
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
As Pentagon officials wrap up their investigation into the plane crash that killed Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown and 34 others in Croatia, Defense Secretary William J. Perry said there is no evidence Brown pressured Air Force pilots to fly through a rainstorm to their destination that day. He was replying to a question about assertions by a Brown friend who said he called her shortly before the flight.
NEWS
June 8, 1996 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Air Force conceded Friday that the crash that killed Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown in Croatia last April could have been averted if the pilots and their senior commanders had followed rules for instrument landings at poorly equipped airports.
NEWS
June 7, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The pilots of the Air Force passenger jet that crashed in Croatia two months ago, killing Commerce Secretary Ronald H. Brown and 34 others, set a wrong course after crossing a navigational radio beacon while preparing to land and also failed to tune into a key second beacon on the ground, according to Pentagon officials. Evidence gathered by investigators also shows the plane was flying too fast as it crossed the first beacon about 12 miles from the Dubrovnik airfield.
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