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Ronald H Griffith

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NEWS
February 17, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it must be, finally, a great armored battle in the sand to settle the Persian Gulf War, the outcome is likely to bear the handwriting of some lone officer. Up along the front lines, probably in the pitch dark of night, under the rage of open-field warfare, this commander will sound an order--an order he has prepared his whole life to give.
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NEWS
February 17, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it must be, finally, a great armored battle in the sand to settle the Persian Gulf War, the outcome is likely to bear the handwriting of some lone officer. Up along the front lines, probably in the pitch dark of night, under the rage of open-field warfare, this commander will sound an order--an order he has prepared his whole life to give.
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NEWS
February 11, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Army heads toward battle, its experts in the laws of war have warned soldiers to brace themselves for the quiet moment after combat when a burst of fury can stir an urge to exact revenge. "You have to prepare yourself to expect the surge of adrenaline on contact," said Lt. Col. John Altenburg, a Vietnam veteran and expert in battlefield behavior, now serving as the staff judge advocate for the 1st Armored Division here.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost every morning now, Army Capt. Charlie Arp shuffles through his notebook and tries to tell the men of Alpha Company that they are living in historic times. One day, Arp, a native of Blue Ridge, Ga., told of a massive B-52 attack to the north, a score of American bombers attacking Iraqi troops for hours on end. Another time he talked of the sheer size of the American buildup.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They seemed to come from everywhere and nowhere, prisoners materializing in the desert, white flags suddenly visible across the sand. Tattered, thin and hungry, many had fled a remote Iraqi training camp as it was taken under fire by this advancing U.S. Army brigade. Now they were coming forth from all directions to tender their surrender.
NEWS
April 7, 2000 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A two-star general accused of groping a female peer later is nominated for the Army's No. 2 investigative post, defense officials acknowledged Thursday, raising questions about whether military leaders had dealt appropriately with the woman's explosive allegations. Maj. Gen. Larry G. Smith, a decorated Vietnam War veteran, was nominated to be the Army's deputy inspector general on Aug. 27, even though Lt. Gen. Claudia J.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Out on a dusty firing range more than two weeks into combat, the generals descended by helicopter, taking a break from war planning to see whether the new weapon really worked. On display was a rocket-powered explosive used to clear minefields from a distance, a much-desired tool in an expected U.S. advance against fortified Iraqi positions.
NEWS
April 2, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A growing fear that thousands of Iraqi refugees under allied protection will be slaughtered when U.S. troops go home will not affect plans to remove most American forces as rapidly as possible, Administration officials said Monday. Pentagon officials said the United States will not assume responsibility for the safety of an estimated 25,000 Iraqi civilians who fled their homes in southern Iraq as loyalist forces systematically crushed an insurgency.
NEWS
March 5, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rifle pointed, nose down, into the battle-trampled sand, a helmet perched atop it, a pair of empty boots behind. A battalion of soldiers stood at stiff attention in a fierce desert wind as a first sergeant called out the roll to his assembled scout platoon. There was no answer when he shouted, then repeated, the name of Specialist Clarence (Johnny) Cash.
NEWS
February 27, 1991
The generals who lead the U.S. troops in the ground war in Kuwait learned about warfare in the jungles and paddies of Indochina. U.S. combat forces include seven Army divisions of the 7th Corps and the 18th Airborne Corps, two Marine divisions on land and two Marine expeditionary brigades on ships in the Persian Gulf. Here are sketches of the commanders of the main Army and Marine Corps units: Lt. Gen. Calvin A. H. Waller, 53, deputy commander in chief of U.S.
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