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Ronald Harwood

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2007 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
"Beginnings are very important to me, whether it's a letter or an e-mail or a screenplay or a novel or play," said Ronald Harwood, a master of most of those forms. "I think all those things should begin with 'A shot rang out.' It should be so gripping." His latest films open with a death and the blink of an eye, respectively.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2009 | Steven Zeitchik
Roman Polanski may still be in Switzerland, but his movie will be coming to the U.S. The director, who is caught in legal limbo abroad, will see his new movie -- a thriller called "The Ghost Writer" -- released in the U.S. by Summit Entertainment, the studio behind the phenomenally successful "Twilight" franchise. The company plans on a quick turnaround, releasing the Polanski film sometime in the first half of 2010. "Ghost Writer" did not previously have a U.S. distributor. The embattled Polanski is currently living in his Swiss chalet after being released from jail on $4.5-million bail.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2009 | Steven Zeitchik
Roman Polanski may still be in Switzerland, but his movie will be coming to the U.S. The director, who is caught in legal limbo abroad, will see his new movie -- a thriller called "The Ghost Writer" -- released in the U.S. by Summit Entertainment, the studio behind the phenomenally successful "Twilight" franchise. The company plans on a quick turnaround, releasing the Polanski film sometime in the first half of 2010. "Ghost Writer" did not previously have a U.S. distributor. The embattled Polanski is currently living in his Swiss chalet after being released from jail on $4.5-million bail.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2007 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
"Beginnings are very important to me, whether it's a letter or an e-mail or a screenplay or a novel or play," said Ronald Harwood, a master of most of those forms. "I think all those things should begin with 'A shot rang out.' It should be so gripping." His latest films open with a death and the blink of an eye, respectively.
BOOKS
January 7, 1996 | JOHN CLARK
On a crisp night several weeks ago, at the premiere of "Cry, the Beloved Country," Miramax Films head Harvey Weinstein, First Lady Hillary Clinton and South African President Nelson Mandela took turns discussing the meaning of Alan Paton's 40-year-old anti-apartheid novel and the movie based on it. Weinstein used the occasion to hammer away at Republican efforts to dismantle the welfare state. Clinton focused on the story's spirit of reconciliation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2000 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the Odyssey Theatre Ensemble's stunning Los Angeles premiere of Ronald Harwood's "Taking Sides," a post-World War II inquiry into charges of Nazi collaboration against celebrated conductor Wilhelm Furtwangler appears to be an open-and-shut case--one of persecuting an innocent man.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2004
TV renewals: UPN said Monday that it had given full-season orders to its freshmen series "Veronica Mars" and "Kevin Hill." Hot DVD: DreamWorks Animation SKG said Monday that, in its first weekend of release, "Shrek 2" sold 11 million DVDs and an additional 1.1 million videocassettes, producing retail revenue of about $185 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2004 | From Reuters
Oscar-winning director Roman Polanski says his next film will be based on "Oliver Twist," Charles Dickens' classic novel about an orphan. Shooting is scheduled to begin in the Czech Republic by midyear. The book has been adapted for the screen by Ronald Harwood, who also wrote the screenplay for "The Pianist."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2008 | From a Times staff writer
Nancy Oliver, the writer of "Lars and the Real Girl," and Ronald Harwood, who wrote "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," shared the feature film award Wednesday at the annual Humanitas Prizes, which honor film and TV scripts that "explore the human condition . . . and reveal our common humanity." Television winners included Daniel Giat for the HBO movie "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee," Kirk Ellis for the opening chapter of the HBO miniseries "John Adams," Dave Tennant for an episode of NBC's "Scrubs" called "My Long Goodbye," Brian Hohlfeld for an episode of "My Friends Tigger & Pooh" and Ann Austen, Douglas Sloan, Max Enscoe and Annie DeYoung for "Johnny Kapahala: Back on Board."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2000 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the Odyssey Theatre Ensemble's stunning Los Angeles premiere of Ronald Harwood's "Taking Sides," a post-World War II inquiry into charges of Nazi collaboration against celebrated conductor Wilhelm Furtwangler appears to be an open-and-shut case--one of persecuting an innocent man.
BOOKS
January 7, 1996 | JOHN CLARK
On a crisp night several weeks ago, at the premiere of "Cry, the Beloved Country," Miramax Films head Harvey Weinstein, First Lady Hillary Clinton and South African President Nelson Mandela took turns discussing the meaning of Alan Paton's 40-year-old anti-apartheid novel and the movie based on it. Weinstein used the occasion to hammer away at Republican efforts to dismantle the welfare state. Clinton focused on the story's spirit of reconciliation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2003
Best Picture "Chicago" Actor Adrien Brody "The Pianist" Actress Nicole Kidman "The Hours" Supporting Actor Chris Cooper "Adaptation" Supporting Actress Catherine Zeta-Jones "Chicago" Director Roman Polanski "The Pianist" Foreign-language film "Nowhere in Africa" Germany Adapted screenplay Ronald Harwood "The Pianist" Original screenplay Pedro Almodovar "Talk to Her" Animated feature film "Spirited Away" Hayao Miyazaki Art direction John Myhre and Gordon Sim (art direction and set decoration,
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1988 | MARK CHALON SMITH
In Ronald Harwood's "The Dresser," Norman has few illusions about his place in the world. For more than 20 years, he has lived off of, for and because of "Sir," the aging centerpiece of a ragged Shakespeare company barely surviving in England's outback. As Sir's dresser, he not only keeps the actor's wigs, makeup and costumes in order, but massages this very difficult man's difficult ego, gets him up for the performances that blur together and tries to keep him healthy.
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