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Ronald Kadish

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BUSINESS
September 14, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kadish to Direct C-17 Program: The Air Force named Brig. Gen. Ronald Kadish, viewed as a rising star in military management, as program director for the C-17 transport plane being built by McDonnell Douglas Corp. Kadish, now directing Lockheed Corp.'s F-16 jet fighter program, will succeed Brig. Gen. Kenneth Miller at the end of this month. By handing the controversial C-17 program to the 45-year-old Kadish, the Air Force signaled that he is moving up fast through the ranks, observers said.
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BUSINESS
September 14, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kadish to Direct C-17 Program: The Air Force named Brig. Gen. Ronald Kadish, viewed as a rising star in military management, as program director for the C-17 transport plane being built by McDonnell Douglas Corp. Kadish, now directing Lockheed Corp.'s F-16 jet fighter program, will succeed Brig. Gen. Kenneth Miller at the end of this month. By handing the controversial C-17 program to the 45-year-old Kadish, the Air Force signaled that he is moving up fast through the ranks, observers said.
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NEWS
June 23, 2000 | From Associated Press
More than 50 House Democrats urged the FBI on Thursday to investigate "serious allegations of fraud and cover-up" in development of a national missile defense system. The Air Force general in charge of developing the system, Lt. Gen. Ronald Kadish, denied any deception and told Congress such allegations already have been disproved. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2004 | From Associated Press
The United States is on track to activate a limited ballistic missile defense system by the end of the year, the program's director said Wednesday. Lt. Gen. Ronald Kadish, director of the Missile Defense Agency, told a Senate Appropriations subcommittee that he expected to meet President Bush's goal of having 20 interceptors in place by the end of 2005, including a few that would be operational this year.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Defense contractors bear a significant share of the blame for cost overruns in major U.S. weapons programs, said Ronald D. Sugar, chairman and chief executive of Century City-based Northrop Grumman Corp. The government's estimates and expectations may often be unrealistic but the industry's performance also is often poor, Sugar on Wednesday told an independent panel that the Pentagon appointed to review the U.S. military's weapons-buying programs in an effort to cut costs.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1993
Katharine Graham has stepped down as chairwoman of the board of the Washington Post Co. but continues as chairwoman of the executive committee, the company said Thursday. Her son Donald Graham, who had been president, took over as chairman of the board and continues as chief executive, a position he has held since May, 1991. He is also publisher of the Washington Post newspaper. The company said Alan Spoon was elected president and will continue as chief operating officer.
NEWS
December 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
A U.S. interceptor rocket knocked a dummy warhead out of the sky 144 miles over the South Pacific on Monday night for the third successful test of a missile defense system prototype, the Pentagon said. The interceptor, launched from Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands, collided with the warhead about 7:30 p.m. PST, the military said. The test was nearly identical to a successful one in July.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2000 | From Reuters
The key third test of a U.S. antimissile defense system has been postponed for two months until June 26, but President Clinton could still decide as early as this summer whether to begin deploying it, the Pentagon said Tuesday. The third attempt to shoot down a missile warhead over the Pacific Ocean had been scheduled for April 27. But the Defense Department said the delay was ordered to fix a cooling system problem in the interceptor weapon built by Raytheon Co. Air Force Lt. Gen.
NEWS
April 21, 2003 | Charles Piller, Times Staff Writer
The Patriot antimissile system, hailed by U.S. officials as one of the high-tech success stories of the Iraq war, also inflicted some of the most damaging "friendly fire" of the conflict. The Defense Department has acknowledged that the antimissile system was involved in the downing of two allied warplanes, resulting in the deaths of three airmen. The two aircraft -- one American and one British -- are the only confirmed cases of planes being shot down during the war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2001
The Pentagon is being properly cautious about the successful weekend test of its nascent antimissile weapon. Air Force Lt. Gen. Ronald Kadish, head of missile defense programs, was careful to describe it as "just one stop on a journey" that has a long way to go before a credible system to protect against an intercontinental missile attack becomes a reality.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2004 | John Hendren, Times Staff Writer
After the Pentagon's national missile defense system failed a key test this week, the Bush administration has dropped its plans to activate the system by the end of the year. A spokesman for the military's U.S. Northern Command said Friday that the missile system would not become operational until early 2005 at the earliest, meaning the Pentagon would miss a goal advanced by President Bush.
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