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NEWS
April 28, 1987
A 1960s radical has pleaded guilty in San Francisco federal court to possession of unregistered explosives in exchange for a maximum nine-year prison term involving the planting of nine bombs in three states. Ronald Kaufman, 49, a one-time anti-war and civil rights demonstrator and associate of Yippie leader Abbie Hoffman, agreed to plead guilty on the single possession count provided that U.S. District Judge Thelton Henderson goes along with the nine-year maximum term at his July 10 sentencing.
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OPINION
December 17, 1995 | DONNA MUNGEN, Donna Mungen is a contributor to National Public Radio's "All Things Considered" and was nominated for a Cable ACE award for an A&E documentary
County-USC is the foundation for the entire health-care delivery system. If it didn't exist, emergency services for this region would be markedly under-served. This will be a difficult period because there will be ethical considerations on the part of physicians such as, 'How can we ethically turn away patients?' I've been in talks with private hospitals, to see how we can better deliver care for the region. A lot of hospitals view our survival as essential to their well-being.
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NEWS
June 6, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seems as if nothing goes right these days for the Massachusetts Democratic Party. Fiscal problems that have plagued the state have been laid at the feet of the Democratic-run Statehouse. And the defeat of Gov. Michael S. Dukakis in his bid for the presidency in 1988 was a devastating blow to party morale. Now, confusion at last weekend's state convention in Springfield has resulted in "significant damage" to the party, according to U.S. Rep. Chester G.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seems as if nothing goes right these days for the Massachusetts Democratic Party. Fiscal problems that have plagued the state have been laid at the feet of the Democratic-run Statehouse. And the defeat of Gov. Michael S. Dukakis in his bid for the presidency in 1988 was a devastating blow to party morale. Now, confusion at last weekend's state convention in Springfield has resulted in "significant damage" to the party, according to U.S. Rep. Chester G.
OPINION
December 17, 1995 | DONNA MUNGEN, Donna Mungen is a contributor to National Public Radio's "All Things Considered" and was nominated for a Cable ACE award for an A&E documentary
County-USC is the foundation for the entire health-care delivery system. If it didn't exist, emergency services for this region would be markedly under-served. This will be a difficult period because there will be ethical considerations on the part of physicians such as, 'How can we ethically turn away patients?' I've been in talks with private hospitals, to see how we can better deliver care for the region. A lot of hospitals view our survival as essential to their well-being.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1993 | SUSAN BYRNES
Sitting next to her best friend, Valia, but surrounded by virtual strangers, Erin, 16, described what it was like to watch her father get shot and killed by robbers at his used-car shop. Poppie, 18, talked about her three suicide attempts, her drug addiction and being raped by her aunt's boyfriend. Erin was a visitor to the weekly ACTION program for troubled teen-agers at Grant High School in North Hollywood. The other 10 teen-agers there were regulars.
NEWS
July 17, 1986 | MARIANN HANSEN, Times Staff Writer
A man who has been wanted for 14 years on charges that he planted bombs in banks in New York, Chicago and San Francisco has been arrested here, the FBI announced Wednesday. The arrest came Tuesday after the FBI received a tip from a police officer who recognized Ronald Kaufman, 48, from a picture in an FBI bulletin. Kaufman was arrested without incident outside of his San Francisco residence and acknowledged his real identity to police officers, FBI Agent Richard Held said.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Senate on Friday confirmed Andrew H. Card Jr., the deputy White House chief of staff, as the new transportation secretary. Card, 44, was approved on a voice vote to succeed Samuel K. Skinner in the post. Skinner resigned in December to become President Bush's chief of staff. Card said during his confirmation hearing that he would quickly begin spending money from a six-year transportation bill that Congress passed last fall in an effort to help boost the economy.
NEWS
September 25, 1996 | From Associated Press
Gov. Pete Wilson signed a bill Tuesday that will allow people and businesses to sue drug dealers for harm caused by illegal substances. "We're gonna financially bankrupt these leeches," Wilson said. The bill was inspired by the suicide of actor Carroll O'Connor's son, who killed himself last year after battling drug problems. "This morning we take . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1991
This is regarding the article "Care Rationed at Overcrowded County-USC" (Part A, Dec. 16) and the denial of Third World conditions by Dr. Ronald L. Kaufman ("We don't have flies, we don't have cows walking through the place. It's extremely sanitary."). I beg to differ. I worked as a critical care nurse in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit from 1973 to 1986. No, we did not have cows, but we had plenty of flies and cockroaches. At one point the flies were so numerous we had a fly-swatting contest.
NEWS
April 28, 1987
A 1960s radical has pleaded guilty in San Francisco federal court to possession of unregistered explosives in exchange for a maximum nine-year prison term involving the planting of nine bombs in three states. Ronald Kaufman, 49, a one-time anti-war and civil rights demonstrator and associate of Yippie leader Abbie Hoffman, agreed to plead guilty on the single possession count provided that U.S. District Judge Thelton Henderson goes along with the nine-year maximum term at his July 10 sentencing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1996 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned that the punishment may have been too light, Health Services Director Mark Finucane said Thursday that he has begun an investigation into why a County-USC Medical Center surgeon was suspended for only 28 days after allowing a "scrub technician" to operate on a patient. Finucane also said he has begun looking into whether County-USC administrators notified the California Medical Board of the incident as required by law. On Wednesday, Los Angeles City Atty. James K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1995 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With adoption of a new county budget, the health care delivery system for hundreds of thousands of indigent Los Angeles patients will be in a state of extreme uncertainty for months. Long lines, denial of health care and months of chaotic upheavals is the very least that county officials say can be expected by those who rely on its health centers and hospitals. Beyond that, no one knows for sure.
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