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Ronald Kessler

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January 3, 1993 | ALEX RAKSIN
INSIDE THE CIA: Revealing the Secrets of the World's Most Powerful Spy Agency by Ronald Kessler (Pocket Books: $23; 274 pp.). Disturbed by the threadbare way writers have used the CIA as a symbol both of Good (the fount of knowledge in Washington, a town built on knowing) and of Evil (the epitome of corruption in works by '60s writers), Ronald Kessler aims in these pages to offer the first realistic, evenhanded overview of the agency.
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BOOKS
May 19, 2002 | WILLIAM W. TURNER, William W. Turner is a former FBI criminal and counterintelligence agent. His most recent book is "Rearview Mirror: Looking Back at the FBI, the CIA and Other Tails."
Ronald Kessler opens "The Bureau," his comprehensive history of the FBI, with Sept. 11 imagery: Barry Mawn, chief of the New York FBI office, races to the World Trade Center as the twin towers flame. He sees a female leg on the street severed at the knee, a pink sock and white sneaker still on. The image haunts Mawn months later. Kessler's book could not be more timely. Sept.
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NEWS
February 14, 1989
The State Department rejected a claim in a just-published book that U.S. intelligence agents knew the American Embassy in Moscow was "bugged" but did not tell the State Department. The book, "Moscow Station," by Ronald Kessler, alleges that the CIA and the National Security Agency found evidence that listening devices had been planted at the embassy but kept the information secret.
BOOKS
August 31, 1997 | JENNIFER BRADLEY, Jennifer Bradley is a reporter for Roll Call in Washington, D.C. She has also written for the New Republic and the American Prospect
Can bad or mediocre people make good laws? The American system has wagered for 200 years that they can. But it has always been sorely tested by those who do its work. "A Golgotha of numb skulls" is how Congressman Isaiah Green, who represented Massachusetts at the beginning of the 19th century, referred to Capitol Hill. Joseph Quincy, Green's contemporary, lamented that "it is impossible to conceive the comfortlessness and desolation of feeling, the solitariness and depression of spirits . . .
NEWS
May 17, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ABC network news executives killed a story about alleged congressional malfeasance that was to have aired Friday night on the newsmagazine "20/20," prompting a censorship charge from the journalist who originated the probe. The story--which was based on a new book, "Inside Congress," by journalist Ronald Kessler--included allegations of sexual harassment against Rep. Sonny Bono (R-Palm Springs) and of sexual activities by other unnamed lawmakers. Bono has denied the charge.
BOOKS
May 19, 2002 | WILLIAM W. TURNER, William W. Turner is a former FBI criminal and counterintelligence agent. His most recent book is "Rearview Mirror: Looking Back at the FBI, the CIA and Other Tails."
Ronald Kessler opens "The Bureau," his comprehensive history of the FBI, with Sept. 11 imagery: Barry Mawn, chief of the New York FBI office, races to the World Trade Center as the twin towers flame. He sees a female leg on the street severed at the knee, a pink sock and white sneaker still on. The image haunts Mawn months later. Kessler's book could not be more timely. Sept.
BOOKS
August 31, 1997 | JENNIFER BRADLEY, Jennifer Bradley is a reporter for Roll Call in Washington, D.C. She has also written for the New Republic and the American Prospect
Can bad or mediocre people make good laws? The American system has wagered for 200 years that they can. But it has always been sorely tested by those who do its work. "A Golgotha of numb skulls" is how Congressman Isaiah Green, who represented Massachusetts at the beginning of the 19th century, referred to Capitol Hill. Joseph Quincy, Green's contemporary, lamented that "it is impossible to conceive the comfortlessness and desolation of feeling, the solitariness and depression of spirits . . .
NEWS
June 30, 1993 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
The best predictor of divorce among couples married seven years or more is not how fairly they fight, but how often, a new study finds. Frequent arguments were as likely to lead to split-ups among couples who fought "clean" as those who fought "dirty," found Ronald Kessler, professor of sociology at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research. His team periodically surveyed 691 married couples over a three-year period.
SCIENCE
June 18, 2003 | From Associated Press
Treatment rates for major depression have improved significantly over the last two decades, but more than half of patients nationwide are getting inadequate therapy, a new study released Tuesday suggests. The findings suggest that although the stigma of mental illness may be easing, many doctors may not be aware of treatment advancements, and that many patients may be seeking unproven therapies, said Harvard Medical School researcher Ronald Kessler, the study's lead author.
OPINION
June 5, 2005
The 30-year mystery of "Deep Throat" ended last week with an anticlimax: Former FBI man W. Mark Felt was the anonymous source behind the Washington Post's Watergate scoop. A few obsessed observers were on record as suspecting that the 91-year-old G-man was the parking garage leaker who helped bring down President Nixon. Many more, with trademark Washington confidence, were way off the mark. Here's a sampling: "The secret of Deep Throat is that there is no Deep Throat.
NEWS
May 17, 1997 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
ABC network news executives killed a story about alleged congressional malfeasance that was to have aired Friday night on the newsmagazine "20/20," prompting a censorship charge from the journalist who originated the probe. The story--which was based on a new book, "Inside Congress," by journalist Ronald Kessler--included allegations of sexual harassment against Rep. Sonny Bono (R-Palm Springs) and of sexual activities by other unnamed lawmakers. Bono has denied the charge.
BOOKS
January 3, 1993 | ALEX RAKSIN
INSIDE THE CIA: Revealing the Secrets of the World's Most Powerful Spy Agency by Ronald Kessler (Pocket Books: $23; 274 pp.). Disturbed by the threadbare way writers have used the CIA as a symbol both of Good (the fount of knowledge in Washington, a town built on knowing) and of Evil (the epitome of corruption in works by '60s writers), Ronald Kessler aims in these pages to offer the first realistic, evenhanded overview of the agency.
NEWS
February 14, 1989
The State Department rejected a claim in a just-published book that U.S. intelligence agents knew the American Embassy in Moscow was "bugged" but did not tell the State Department. The book, "Moscow Station," by Ronald Kessler, alleges that the CIA and the National Security Agency found evidence that listening devices had been planted at the embassy but kept the information secret.
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