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Ronald Kimball

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BUSINESS
August 22, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Spy Store Owner Indicted: Ronald Kimball, owner of the Spy Factory Inc., has been arrested on charges of smuggling illegal bugging and wiretapping devices, and selling them in his stores. He was named along with two other executives of the San Antonio-based chain in a federal indictment unsealed in New York City. Kimball was arrested in San Antonio.
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BUSINESS
August 22, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Spy Store Owner Indicted: Ronald Kimball, owner of the Spy Factory Inc., has been arrested on charges of smuggling illegal bugging and wiretapping devices, and selling them in his stores. He was named along with two other executives of the San Antonio-based chain in a federal indictment unsealed in New York City. Kimball was arrested in San Antonio.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal authorities shut down Spy Factory, the nation's largest chain of "spy shops," after the company and its owner pleaded guilty to smuggling and selling illegal bugging and wiretapping devices. The San Antonio-based chain was closed shortly after a plea hearing in a Manhattan federal court at which U.S. District Judge Sonia Sotomayor ordered Spy Factory and all of its assets forfeited. The U.S.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You are a high-powered oil company executive fretting over Saddam Hussein's terrorist threats, thinking you would feel a tad more secure with a bulletproof car and some accessories like a bomb scanner, tear-gas deterrent and gun ports. Or perhaps you are a walking zombie because of your neighbor's noisy late-night soirees, thinking you would give anything for an industrial-sized smoke grenade you could use to quickly disperse the crowd.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
The aerospace job applicants come early in the morning, forming long lines that snake through the lobby of the modern suburban office building. Amid pastel furniture and cheery office decor, they wait patiently for a "prescreening" that will determine in a few minutes whether they merit further consideration. This is the scene day after day at Douglas Aircraft Co.'s new employment center in Lakewood, where more than 43,000 people have come so far this year looking for a job.
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