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Ronald M George

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OPINION
July 24, 2010 | Patt Morrison
Free the Supreme Court One! Oh wait — he did it himself. Ronald M. George, California's chief justice for 14 years, says happy trails — and trials — to the state high court in December. He really will spend more time with his family — wife Barbara, sons and grandchildren — and good books instead of court paperwork. People inside the court system may say George's legacy is his top-to-bottom administrative overhaul of California's courts. The rest of us might cite his deciding vote that briefly cleared the legal path for same-sex marriage.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - When Ronald M. George served as chief justice of California, he pleaded annually with legislators for money to run the courts, warning the loss of funds would compromise justice. But he said he learned that some lawmakers took positions on the budget for purely personal reasons, obsessively discussing their divorces or traffic tickets and punishing the judiciary for rulings they did not like. "I remember dealing with one state senator who found it impossible … not to bring up his own divorce proceedings and how he thought he'd gotten a raw deal at the hands of his wife and her attorneys and didn't feel the court system dealt with him fairly," George said, not naming the elected official.
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NEWS
March 6, 1998 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that "single-issue politics" is a threat to an independent judiciary, the chief justice of California said Thursday that he will do "whatever it takes" to beat a campaign by antiabortion forces to unseat him. Chief Justice Ronald M. George, who will be up for confirmation by the state's voters in November, said he has hired a team of political consultants and will not "sit back passively" awaiting his fate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2010
Same-sex marriage: George wrote the 6-1 decision in May 2009 to uphold Proposition 8, rejecting an argument that same-sex marriage could not be abolished by a constitutional amendment. A federal appeals court is now considering a challenge to the 2008 ballot measure. Same-sex marriage: George was the tie-breaker in the 4-3 decision in May 2008 to overturn a ban on same-sex marriage as a violation of the state Constitution. The decision, written by George, was a bold surprise from the Republican-dominated court.
NEWS
September 9, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson's selection of Justice Ronald M. George to the state Supreme Court was generally well received in legal circles. Yet there was some disappointment that the governor did not name a minority to succeed retiring Justice Allen E. Broussard, the court's only black. George, sworn into office last week, said in an interview he believes that minorities and women will grow in number throughout the California judiciary during Wilson's tenure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1998
Re "George and Chin Are Unfairly Targeted," Commentary, Oct. 21: Stephen R. Barnett tells only part of the story. In 1987, the California Legislature, controlled by Democrats, passed the parental consent law; it was signed by a Republican governor. In 1996, the California Supreme Court found the law constitutional both under the U.S. and California constitutions. Shortly after the decision was handed down, Ronald M. George was elevated to chief justice and two new justices, Ming W. Chin and Janice R. Brown, were appointed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1998
JANICE ROGERS BROWN * Position: Associate justice, California Supreme Court * Age: 49 * Education: UCLA School of Law, 1977. Bachelor's, Cal State Sacramento, economics, 1974. * Career highlights: Appointed to California Supreme Court by Gov. Pete Wilson, 1996. Deputy attorney general, state Department of Justice, 1979-87. Deputy secretary and general counsel, California Business, Transportation and Housing Agency, 1987-89.
NEWS
July 24, 1987 | MYRNA OLIVER, Times Legal Affairs Writer
The judge and one of the prosecutors in the "Hillside Strangler" trial were named justices of the state's Los Angeles-based 2nd District Court of Appeal on Thursday by Gov. George Deukmejian. They will fill the vacancies left when Justices John A. Arguelles and David N. Eagleson were elevated to the California Supreme Court earlier this year. Ronald M. George and Roger W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1997 | ANNA CEKOLA
Judges pulled out their cameras and declared it a historic day as California Chief Justice Ronald M. George toured several county courthouses Thursday to get a firsthand look at some of the local justice system's successes and problems. From cutting edge computer systems and misdemeanor video arraignments to cracks and water stains on the ceiling of the presiding judge's courtroom, the chief justice saw it all on the whirlwind visit, the 25th stop on his tour of courts in all 58 counties.
OPINION
October 1, 2010
As California's political institutions sink further into partisan gridlock and suffer increasing failures of accountability, the state's court system remains a model of independence and thoughtful balance. In some other states, political parties and moneyed interests run judicial campaigns and try to con voters into stacking the bench or guaranteeing a particular verdict or ruling. Here, justices of the state Supreme Court and the Courts of Appeal are vetted by attorneys and judges, appointed by the governor, confirmed by a panel that includes the attorney general and the chief justice, and ultimately submitted for an up-or-down vote by the electorate.
OPINION
October 1, 2010
As California's political institutions sink further into partisan gridlock and suffer increasing failures of accountability, the state's court system remains a model of independence and thoughtful balance. In some other states, political parties and moneyed interests run judicial campaigns and try to con voters into stacking the bench or guaranteeing a particular verdict or ruling. Here, justices of the state Supreme Court and the Courts of Appeal are vetted by attorneys and judges, appointed by the governor, confirmed by a panel that includes the attorney general and the chief justice, and ultimately submitted for an up-or-down vote by the electorate.
OPINION
July 24, 2010 | Patt Morrison
Free the Supreme Court One! Oh wait — he did it himself. Ronald M. George, California's chief justice for 14 years, says happy trails — and trials — to the state high court in December. He really will spend more time with his family — wife Barbara, sons and grandchildren — and good books instead of court paperwork. People inside the court system may say George's legacy is his top-to-bottom administrative overhaul of California's courts. The rest of us might cite his deciding vote that briefly cleared the legal path for same-sex marriage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2005 | By Jack Leonard, Evelyn Larrubia and Robin Fields, Times Staff Writers
Calling for reform of California's "broken" conservatorship system, a leading lawmaker outlined an ambitious plan Monday for licensing and auditing professional guardians who care for the state's most vulnerable adults. Assemblyman Dave Jones (D-Sacramento), chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said he would introduce a bill next month that would require training and licensure for conservators. It would also create a state ombudsman to investigate complaints and give courts more resources to conduct spot audits of conservators' work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2003 | Evan Halper and Carl Ingram, Times Staff Writers
California's chief jurist on Tuesday became the latest top official to warn of devastating effects from budget cuts proposed by Gov. Gray Davis, as the nonpartisan legislative analyst spelled out just how hard services would be hit by a Republican plan that calls for even more. Chief Justice Ronald George told lawmakers that the governor's proposed $134 million in judicial budget cuts could close the courthouse doors to poor families and children, as well as civil litigants.
NEWS
December 4, 2000 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Since his appointment as chief justice of the California Supreme Court four years ago, Ronald M. George has tried to lead the Republican court on a centrist, nonideological path. But Thursday, George was unable to persuade a majority of his colleagues to issue a restrained ruling on Proposition 209, the 1996 anti-affirmative action initiative that divided the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1998
JANICE ROGERS BROWN * Position: Associate justice, California Supreme Court * Age: 49 * Education: UCLA School of Law, 1977. Bachelor's, Cal State Sacramento, economics, 1974. * Career highlights: Appointed to California Supreme Court by Gov. Pete Wilson, 1996. Deputy attorney general, state Department of Justice, 1979-87. Deputy secretary and general counsel, California Business, Transportation and Housing Agency, 1987-89.
NEWS
March 29, 1996 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson on Thursday appointed Janice Rogers Brown, a conservative African American appellate judge and former aide, to the California Supreme Court despite a state bar panel rating that she is too inexperienced for the job. Wilson, announcing the appointment at a Sacramento news conference, also elevated Justice Ronald M. George to lead the court when Chief Justice Malcolm Lucas retires May 1. George's promotion received wide praise from legal analysts.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER and JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Pete Wilson, making his first appointment to the state Supreme Court, on Monday named Appellate Justice Ronald M. George of Los Angeles to succeed retiring Justice Allen E. Broussard. George, 51, is a former prosecutor and Superior Court judge who presided over the two-year trial of convicted Hillside Strangler Angelo Buono Jr. Named to the state Court of Appeal by then-Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1998
Re "George and Chin Are Unfairly Targeted," Commentary, Oct. 21: Stephen R. Barnett tells only part of the story. In 1987, the California Legislature, controlled by Democrats, passed the parental consent law; it was signed by a Republican governor. In 1996, the California Supreme Court found the law constitutional both under the U.S. and California constitutions. Shortly after the decision was handed down, Ronald M. George was elevated to chief justice and two new justices, Ming W. Chin and Janice R. Brown, were appointed.
NEWS
March 6, 1998 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Warning that "single-issue politics" is a threat to an independent judiciary, the chief justice of California said Thursday that he will do "whatever it takes" to beat a campaign by antiabortion forces to unseat him. Chief Justice Ronald M. George, who will be up for confirmation by the state's voters in November, said he has hired a team of political consultants and will not "sit back passively" awaiting his fate.
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