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BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Taco Bell is leaving no doubt that it's going after McDonald's.  Commercials began airing Thursday promoting Taco Bell's new breakfast menu featuring - Ronald McDonald. Make that nearly two dozen of them. Don't expect them to look like a certain red-haired clown, though. The Ronald McDonalds featured in the ads are everyday men - including a father and son - with the same name.  "My name is Ronald McDonald," said the man from Kane, Penn., who later said he loved the "new A.M. Crunchwrap.
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BUSINESS
April 23, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Same clown, new clothes: Is that the main takeaway of McDonald's newest makeover of its brand ambassador Ronald McDonald? On Wednesday, the Oak Brook, Ill., fast-food giant unveiled a new look for the redheaded clown and announced he'd be featured on McDonald's social media accounts. Gone are the lumpy yellow jumpsuit and Where's Waldo-esque sleeves. In its place is something a Weasley twin might wear -- mustard cargo pants and a red-and-white striped rugby shirt. For “special occasions,” there's a bow tie and a red blazer festooned with golden arches and Ron's signature.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1987 | DIANNE KLEIN, Times Staff Writer
It's a long way from the black-tie dinner in Chicago where singer Barbara Mandrell entertains the likes of Nancy Reagan to the stark hospital room at Childrens Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), where about the only sound is the whir of medical equipment. But the connection is there. Yolanda Linares, a Guatemalan immigrant, says she has hardly slept since her 8-month-old daughter, Nancy, was hospitalized four months ago for treatment of liver cancer. Since then, there have been four operations.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Taco Bell is leaving no doubt that it's going after McDonald's.  Commercials began airing Thursday promoting Taco Bell's new breakfast menu featuring - Ronald McDonald. Make that nearly two dozen of them. Don't expect them to look like a certain red-haired clown, though. The Ronald McDonalds featured in the ads are everyday men - including a father and son - with the same name.  "My name is Ronald McDonald," said the man from Kane, Penn., who later said he loved the "new A.M. Crunchwrap.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1998 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hoping to make its longtime mascots more appealing to media-savvy kids, McDonald's Corp. has hired the creator of the edgy "Rugrats" cartoons to give Ronald McDonald and friends a make-over. Los Angeles-based Klasky Csupo Inc., the animation studio behind "Rugrats," will tweak the look and personality of Hamburglar, Grimace and Mayor McCheese. They, along with Ronald, will appear in 40-minute videos McDonald's plans to sell in its restaurants beginning in October.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1989 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
The Board of Supervisors chose Ronald McDonald over Orange County's Carl's Jr. for the right to sell fast food at the new John Wayne Airport terminal. And McDonald's can expect to gobble more than a mouthful of profits. That's because the Board of Supervisors voted 4 to 0 Tuesday to approve McDonald's as the exclusive fast-food nosh-ery for the new passenger terminal.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | MAUREEN O'HAREN, Maureen O'Haren is a writer based in Laguna Niguel. and
Five days after she gave birth by Cesarean section, Penni Wagenblast was out on the street with no clothes, no car and nowhere to go. Wagenblast's husband was caring for their three children at home in Big Bear, but she had to stay near her infant son, Kyle, who was born six weeks prematurely in Saint Joseph Hospital in Orange. He remained in intensive care.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1991 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tonight's airing of "The Wish That Changed Christmas" on CBS has drawn fire from children's television advocates who say it is nothing more than a program-length commercial for its sponsor, McDonald's restaurants. The 8:30 p.m. program is the first of what McDonald's says will be an occasional series called "Ronald McDonald's Family Theater," intended to promote reading.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1998 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ronald McDonald, the 35-year-old icon for the McDonald's hamburger chain, has a new, hipper look intended to appeal to today's media-savvy kids. The new Ronald, with a thinner face and spikier hair than the familiar Ronald, debuted this week in an animated video that McDonald's plans to sell at its U.S. restaurants. Ronald is getting a make-over at a time when the hamburger chain is trying to reinvent itself.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2010 | By Emily Bryson York
A Sacramento mother and the Center for Science in the Public Interest filed a lawsuit Wednesday against McDonald's Corp., alleging that its practice of giving toys with children's meals is deceptive to children. The organization had been threatening to sue McDonald's since last summer, claiming that the Happy Meals toys constitute a method of circumventing parental control and teach children unhealthy eating. The complaint, filed in San Francisco Superior Court, also accuses the company of false advertising.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By David Ng
When Banksy began his highly touted "residency" in New York earlier this month, the Twitter account @banksyny was reported by some news outlets -- including the Los Angeles Times -- as belonging to the pseudonymous British street artist. Since then, rumors have been circulating that the account is actually a fake. The @banksyny account began tweeting on Oct. 1 and has so far amassed more than 27,000 followers. The owner of the account appears to have tweeted fewer than 20 times, usually writing in vague terms such as "time to step it up" and "A cup of tea would restore my normality.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
Some brittle and warped, others as smooth and flat as the day they left the processing shop, the 35-millimeter negatives trickle in to Xiao Ma's dank recycling depot in north Beijing, collected by a network of trash pickers. Stuffed into old rice bags and sugar sacks, they pile up nearly to the ceiling, along with X-rays, compact discs and other trash. Whether it's hospital film of a broken rib or a snapshot of a baby's first steps matters not; with the help of a little chemistry, Xiao Ma can turn both into cash.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2011 | By Emily Bryson York and Gregory Karp
The national debate on corporate responsibility played out in a microcosm at McDonald's annual meeting Thursday, when votes on shareholder proposals became a referendum on the pursuit of profit versus the question of what constitutes the public good. Critics hammered McDonald's executives not only for offering unhealthful menu items but also for marketing fast food to kids with its Ronald McDonald character and Happy Meal toys — all while boasting eight straight years of sales growth despite a deep economic recession.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2011 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
The restaurant industry is quietly — and successfully — fighting back against the enactment of so-called Happy Meal bans, which forbid restaurants like McDonald's to hand out toys with children's meals that are high in calories. Moving under the radar so stealthily that in some cases local politicians and anti-obesity activists missed it entirely, lobbyists in Florida and Arizona backed successful efforts to take away the power to enact such bans from cities and counties. In Nebraska, a proposed statewide Happy Meal ban died in February, even before its first legislative committee hearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2011 | Jeff Weiss
Revolutions are still televised, but they get Tumblr'd, tweeted and YouTubed first. This one started last summer when music micro-bloggers began deifying a pack of nine skateboarding, freewheeling teenaged rap vandals from Los Angeles. Full name: Odd Future Wolf Gang Kill Them All -- or OFWGKTA if you're into brevity. Like most Internet contagions, the first germs of information spread via viral video. Directed by the crew's founder, Tyler the Creator, the clip for a song called "French" felt like Larry Clark's "Kids" updated for the "Jackass" and American Apparel generation: full of skateboarding, vomiting, automatic handguns and suggestive maneuvers with a plastic Ronald McDonald statuette.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Kim Hill, whose childhood battle with leukemia was the catalyst for the creation of the first Ronald McDonald House in Philadelphia in 1974, has died. She was 44. Hill died Saturday at UCI Medical Center in Orange, said her father, Fred Hill. Radiation treatments to overcome leukemia as a child had caused the formation of brain tumors as an adult, he said. FOR THE RECORD Kim Hill: The obituary in the March 9 LATExtra section of Kim Hill, whose childhood battle with leukemia was the catalyst for the creation of the first Ronald McDonald House in 1974, misspelled the name of the president and chief executive of Ronald McDonald House Charities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1989
In regard to the article entitled "Dannemeyer Suggests a Top-Level Gay Drift": Next to Ronald McDonald, Rep. William E. Dannemeyer has got to be the biggest Bozo around. Perhaps Ronald McDonald would make a more compassionate and unprejudiced politician. He would not, however, be more laughable. SCOTT ZUCKER SKY HOFFMAN Laguna Beach
BUSINESS
June 8, 2005 | From Reuters
Ronald McDonald is getting an unlikely image makeover -- as a snowboarding, hoops-shooting fitness guru for tots. The new, athletic Ronald, McDonald's Corp.'s mascot for the last 42 years, will even be sporting a more form-fitting version of his trademark yellow jumpsuit in a television commercial that will air starting Friday. Images of fruits and vegetables abound in the spot, and hamburgers and fries are conspicuously absent.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2010 | By Emily Bryson York
A Sacramento mother and the Center for Science in the Public Interest filed a lawsuit Wednesday against McDonald's Corp., alleging that its practice of giving toys with children's meals is deceptive to children. The organization had been threatening to sue McDonald's since last summer, claiming that the Happy Meals toys constitute a method of circumventing parental control and teach children unhealthy eating. The complaint, filed in San Francisco Superior Court, also accuses the company of false advertising.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2005 | Claire Hoffman, Times Staff Writer
McDonald's Corp. is turning to "Shrek" to lead it to greener pastures in Hollywood. The fast-food giant disclosed Wednesday that it would end its exclusive, decade-long promotional partnership with Walt Disney Co. when it teams with rival DreamWorks Animation SKG Inc. starting in May 2007. First up will be "Shrek 3," with McDonald's promoting DreamWorks' next computer-animated installment about the giant green ogre via Happy Meals and other promotions in its 30,000-plus restaurants worldwide.
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