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Ronald Motley

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BUSINESS
May 20, 2001 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key architect of the legal war on Big Tobacco has gone to court against two of the country's richest and best-known plaintiff lawyers, claiming they reneged on a pledge to cut him in on a fortune in legal fees.
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BUSINESS
May 20, 2001 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key architect of the legal war on Big Tobacco has gone to court against two of the country's richest and best-known plaintiff lawyers, claiming they reneged on a pledge to cut him in on a fortune in legal fees.
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BUSINESS
January 12, 2001 | Reuters
G-I Holdings, formerly GAF Corp., sued a group of prominent personal injury lawyers for racketeering, alleging they schemed to flood U.S. courts with hundreds of thousands of asbestos cases regardless of the legitimacy of the claims. The suit, filed in federal court in Manhattan, names such well-known lawyers as Ronald Motley and Joseph Rice of the Charleston, S.C.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1994 | From Reuters
The attack on the tobacco industry by states trying to recoup taxpayers' health care costs is escalating, with Minnesota joining the fray and several more suits expected this month and next. Minnesota this week became the second state to file suit, following Mississippi's lead in May. West Virginia has also said it will sue, and Florida and Massachusetts have passed legislation allowing them to sue tobacco companies for reimbursement of Medicaid costs. Ronald Motley, a Charleston, S.C.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1998 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tobacco companies scored an important legal victory in a Muncie, Ind., court Thursday when jurors found them not liable for the lung cancer death of a nurse exposed to the smoke of patients in a local veterans hospital. It was the first secondhand-smoke case in history to be tried to a verdict. The victory was particularly sweet for cigarette makers, who are struggling to convince Congress that a proposed tobacco settlement is fair because their legal defenses remain strong.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1996 | MYRON LEVIN and HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A former R.J. Reynolds scientist has testified that company lawyers and executives disbanded a major research project on smoking and emphysema more than 25 years ago because they feared the findings could be turned against the industry in court. In a deposition in a tobacco lawsuit in Texas, the former scientist, Joseph E. Bumgarner, told how he and 25 other members of Reynolds' biological research division in Winston-Salem, N.C.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A former Philip Morris scientist testified under oath Thursday that he was ordered to shred the only copy of test reports that showed very high concentrations of a known carcinogen in tobacco smoke. William Raymond Morgan, an analytical chemist who worked for Philip Morris for 20 years, also testified that Philip Morris researchers normally used only "nonproduction" cigarettes in tests for carcinogens.
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the first class-action suit of its kind in California, Aetna Inc., one of the nation's largest managed health care providers, was accused Thursday of failing to disclose confidential arrangements with physicians that were injurious to members of the health plan. The lawsuit, filed in Contra Costa County Superior Court, charges that under the contracts, doctors were barred from disclosing information to patients about monetary incentives based on providing less care.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1996 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
A Florida judge ruled Friday that state attorneys can proceed with racketeering claims in their massive lawsuit against the tobacco industry, a ruling that could enhance the state's case against cigarette makers and raise the possible damages. Circuit Court Judge Harold J. Cohen in West Palm Beach held that Florida's attorneys have stated a viable cause of action under the state's Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act, which is similar to the federal statute of the same name.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2003 | Ken Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
When lawyers for the families of the Sept. 11 victims filed a $1-trillion lawsuit against banks, charities and individuals who purportedly funneled money to Al Qaeda, they named as their lead investigator Jean-Charles Brisard, who had written a book on terrorist financing.
WORLD
December 22, 2004 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
Lawyers for victims of attacks by Palestinian militant groups filed suit Tuesday against a prominent Middle Eastern bank, saying it helped funnel money to Palestinian suicide bombers and should be forced to pay damages. The suit against Arab Bank was filed in federal district court in Brooklyn, N.Y., on behalf of nearly 700 victims of attacks in Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip and their relatives. The plaintiffs are from Israel, the U.S. and 10 other countries.
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