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Ronald N Tutor

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HOME & GARDEN
January 8, 2010 | By Lauren Beale
Ronald N. Tutor, president and chief executive of construction giant Tutor-Saliba, has listed his Hidden Hills compound for $18.9 million. The Tudor-style estate sits on 3.4 acres of rolling lawns with a lake, waterfalls, a swimming pool and grotto, gardens and a tennis court. The gated home of more than 19,000 square feet has a master suite with his-and-her closets and six additional bedroom suites in the main wing. A bridge stretching across to the entertainment wing contains a large arcade.
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HOME & GARDEN
January 8, 2010 | By Lauren Beale
Ronald N. Tutor, president and chief executive of construction giant Tutor-Saliba, has listed his Hidden Hills compound for $18.9 million. The Tudor-style estate sits on 3.4 acres of rolling lawns with a lake, waterfalls, a swimming pool and grotto, gardens and a tennis court. The gated home of more than 19,000 square feet has a master suite with his-and-her closets and six additional bedroom suites in the main wing. A bridge stretching across to the entertainment wing contains a large arcade.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
One of Southern California's leading contractors, whose "love affair" with USC began as a schoolboy attending football games, is donating $10 million to construct a new building for the School of Engineering. In recognition of the gift, which will be officially announced today, USC plans to name the four-story building after Ronald N.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2003 | Ted Rohrlich, Times Staff Writer
Public works construction magnate Ron Tutor has lived by a simple, merciless creed: "We ask no quarter. We give no quarter." Now that is coming back to haunt him. Tutor has made big marks on California's landscape while amassing hundreds of millions of dollars, a yacht he rents out for hundreds of thousands of dollars a week, and a Boeing 737 jetliner.
NEWS
November 17, 1993 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As cost increases go for the Los Angeles subway project, it was not a staggering item. But when transit officials decided last year to pay a contractor $15,000 extra to clean up a work site, they acted against the consistent recommendations of their predecessors. The money was sought by Tutor-Saliba Corp., whose representatives said that the firm had incurred extra costs when officials ordered the cleanup of tunnel and station areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2001 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As James K. Hahn moves into his new office at City Hall, he has Ronald N. Tutor, in part, to thank for it. Tutor, president of construction giant Tutor-Saliba Corp., spent $75,000 to help Hahn win the mayor's race. That money went for mailers that backed Hahn as an experienced crime-fighter and branded his rival, Antonio Villaraigosa, as "armed and dangerous." The contractor also hosted two fund-raisers for Hahn during the long mayoral campaign.
NEWS
November 6, 1992 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Auditors have questioned $2.7 million in overhead expenses incurred by the top contractor for Los Angeles's rail transit network, including political contributions, personal air travel and a fitness trainer for the firm's president. The Los Angeles County Transportation Commission is seeking to recover an estimated $200,000 of the overhead costs that auditors contend were improperly charged to the agency by Tutor-Saliba Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three retired Carpenters Union members have filed a lawsuit in federal court alleging that the trustees and a prominent financial advisor to their union's nearly $2-billion Southern California pension fund have "engaged in improper self-dealing" by investing pension money in businesses in which they have "direct and substantial" financial interests. The first trustee named in the lawsuit is Ronald N. Tutor, president of Tutor-Saliba Corp., one of the state's biggest construction firms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2003 | Ted Rohrlich, Times Staff Writer
Public works construction magnate Ron Tutor has lived by a simple, merciless creed: "We ask no quarter. We give no quarter." Now that is coming back to haunt him. Tutor has made big marks on California's landscape while amassing hundreds of millions of dollars, a yacht he rents out for hundreds of thousands of dollars a week, and a Boeing 737 jetliner.
NEWS
May 24, 1993 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual alliance, Los Angeles' leading subway builder and a major union pension fund have engaged in business transactions involving a professional boxing venture and a Texas company that supplies most of the concrete for the giant Metro Rail project. While serving as co-chairman of the regional carpenters pension fund, contractor Ronald N. Tutor and his partners in a boxing operation staged televised bouts at a Palm Springs hotel owned by the fund, The Times has learned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2001 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As James K. Hahn moves into his new office at City Hall, he has Ronald N. Tutor, in part, to thank for it. Tutor, president of construction giant Tutor-Saliba Corp., spent $75,000 to help Hahn win the mayor's race. That money went for mailers that backed Hahn as an experienced crime-fighter and branded his rival, Antonio Villaraigosa, as "armed and dangerous." The contractor also hosted two fund-raisers for Hahn during the long mayoral campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three retired Carpenters Union members have filed a lawsuit in federal court alleging that the trustees and a prominent financial advisor to their union's nearly $2-billion Southern California pension fund have "engaged in improper self-dealing" by investing pension money in businesses in which they have "direct and substantial" financial interests. The first trustee named in the lawsuit is Ronald N. Tutor, president of Tutor-Saliba Corp., one of the state's biggest construction firms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
One of Southern California's leading contractors, whose "love affair" with USC began as a schoolboy attending football games, is donating $10 million to construct a new building for the School of Engineering. In recognition of the gift, which will be officially announced today, USC plans to name the four-story building after Ronald N.
NEWS
November 17, 1993 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As cost increases go for the Los Angeles subway project, it was not a staggering item. But when transit officials decided last year to pay a contractor $15,000 extra to clean up a work site, they acted against the consistent recommendations of their predecessors. The money was sought by Tutor-Saliba Corp., whose representatives said that the firm had incurred extra costs when officials ordered the cleanup of tunnel and station areas.
NEWS
May 24, 1993 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual alliance, Los Angeles' leading subway builder and a major union pension fund have engaged in business transactions involving a professional boxing venture and a Texas company that supplies most of the concrete for the giant Metro Rail project. While serving as co-chairman of the regional carpenters pension fund, contractor Ronald N. Tutor and his partners in a boxing operation staged televised bouts at a Palm Springs hotel owned by the fund, The Times has learned.
NEWS
November 6, 1992 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Auditors have questioned $2.7 million in overhead expenses incurred by the top contractor for Los Angeles's rail transit network, including political contributions, personal air travel and a fitness trainer for the firm's president. The Los Angeles County Transportation Commission is seeking to recover an estimated $200,000 of the overhead costs that auditors contend were improperly charged to the agency by Tutor-Saliba Corp.
OPINION
November 15, 1992
I suppose I am naive to be outraged by yet another revelation of misused public funds as described in your article about rail system expenditures. I find McSpedon's drop-in-the-bucket attitude particularly galling considering the extreme measures other government and nonprofit agencies are being forced to adopt to stay afloat. I would reply to Tutor-Saliba president Ronald N. Tutor that as long as one dime of taxpayer money is involved, it is everybody's business to know how that money is being spent.
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