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Ronald Neame

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2010 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Ronald Neame, a prominent figure in the British film industry whose long and varied career included producing the 1940s classics "Great Expectations" and "Oliver Twist" and directing films such as "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie" and "The Poseidon Adventure," has died. He was 99. Neame, who also directed Judy Garland's final film, "I Could Go on Singing," died Wednesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said his wife, Donna. He was injured in a fall May 6 and had two operations on his leg, but his health kept declining after the second operation, she said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2010 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Ronald Neame, a prominent figure in the British film industry whose long and varied career included producing the 1940s classics "Great Expectations" and "Oliver Twist" and directing films such as "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie" and "The Poseidon Adventure," has died. He was 99. Neame, who also directed Judy Garland's final film, "I Could Go on Singing," died Wednesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, said his wife, Donna. He was injured in a fall May 6 and had two operations on his leg, but his health kept declining after the second operation, she said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"I mean this very genuinely," Ronald Neame says, and the look on his face tells you he really does. "It's astonishing to me that five of my films will be running on Hollywood Boulevard -- and one of them is 50 years old. I've made some good, bad and indifferent films, and some absolute stinkers, but I've never thought of myself as other than a reasonably competent director."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"I mean this very genuinely," Ronald Neame says, and the look on his face tells you he really does. "It's astonishing to me that five of my films will be running on Hollywood Boulevard -- and one of them is 50 years old. I've made some good, bad and indifferent films, and some absolute stinkers, but I've never thought of myself as other than a reasonably competent director."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2005
The British Academy of Film & Television Arts Los Angeles hosts the 2005 BAFTA/LA Cunard Britannia Awards. Elizabeth Taylor, Tom Cruise, Mike Newell and Ronald Neame receive top honors for the year.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its 15th year, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Foreign Language Symposium has grown, in the words of writer-producer Fay Kanin, chair of the foreign language committee, from a loose gathering of 50 people in a small hotel conference room to a turn-away event held in the academy's 1,000-seat Samuel Goldwyn Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2012 | By Susan King
Ernest Borgnine , who died Sunday at age 95, worked with some of the greatest directors of the 20th century. He first caught the eye of moviegoers in 1953 in Fred Zinnemann's Oscar-winning best film "From Here to Eternity," in which he played the savage Fatso Judson, the sergeant of the guard of the stockade who beats Angelo Maggio (Frank Sinatra) to death. Two years later, the burly character actor became a bona-fide star as a lonely Italian butcher desperate for love in "Marty," directed by Delbert Mann and penned by Paddy Chayesfky.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Don't expect to see any of David Lean's lavish epics such as "The Bridge on the River Kwai," "Lawrence of Arabia" and "Doctor Zhivago" at UCLA Film & Television Archive's retrospective of the Oscar-winning British director. The festival, which marks the filmmaker's centenary, shines the spotlight on Lean's first 10 British films, which were made during the 1940s and early '50s. Opening the tribute Friday evening at the Billy Wilder Theater is 1942's World War II epic "In Which We Serve."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1987 | CLARKE TAYLOR
Alec Guinness was hailed here by friends and colleagues Monday night as being an actor, rather than a star, who has remained "one of the brightest lights" of the acting profession for more than half a century. "And the Force is still with us," proclaimed Vincent Price, borrowing from Guinness' signature line in "Star Wars" to assure a Lincoln Center audience of more than 2,000 that the knighted English actor and his film career live on.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
Film actors and directors took their campaign against colorizing and altering movies to Washington on Tuesday. They sought legislation to protect their "moral rights" or similar protection through U.S. adherence to the 100-year-old Berne Copyright Convention, an international treaty.
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