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Ronald Peters

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SPORTS
February 22, 1997
The Kings promised that this was the season of "Serious Hockey." It has gone way past serious. . . . It's grim. RONALD PETERS Thousand Oaks
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SPORTS
February 22, 1997
The Kings promised that this was the season of "Serious Hockey." It has gone way past serious. . . . It's grim. RONALD PETERS Thousand Oaks
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SPORTS
April 4, 1989
Ronald Peters, identified as a key figure in the investigation that led to a gambling probe of Cincinnati Reds Manager Pete Rose, announced his intent to plead guilty to federal drug and tax charges.
SPORTS
June 17, 1989
The man described as Pete Rose's bookmaker earned a major reduction in his sentence on drug and tax charges in Cincinnati Friday because he cooperated with federal investigators in a probe of Rose's taxes. Ronald Peters, 32, was sentenced to two years in jail by U.S. District Judge S. Arthur Spiegel on charges that carried a maximum 23-year prison term. Peters formally pleaded guilty to cocaine distribution and making a false statement on his 1985 tax return by failing to report $80,000 in gambling and bookmaking income.
SPORTS
April 26, 1989
The judge who said last Friday that he thought there was a vendetta against Pete Rose said he would have no further comment until he sentences the Ohio bookmaker linked to the manager of the Cincinnati Reds. U.S. District Judge Carl B. Rubin said that the bookmaker, Ronald Peters, would be sentenced shortly after being convicted of cocaine trafficking and tax evasion.
SPORTS
June 13, 1989
Ronald Peters, identified as a bookmaker for Pete Rose, said he has renewed an offer of an interview without conditions to lawyers for the Cincinnati Reds manager. Rose's lawyers, who are preparing for a meeting June 26 in New York with baseball Commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti, had no comment regarding the offer.
SPORTS
May 6, 1989
U.S. District Judge Carl B. Rubin, who had criticized baseball's investigation of Pete Rose as a "vendetta," again removed himself from handling the criminal case of a man linked to Rose. Thomas P. Gioiosa of New Bedford, Mass., who once lived with Rose's family, faces trial on federal felony charges of tax evasion and conspiracy to distribute cocaine. Last week, Rubin disqualified himself from the sentencing of Ronald Peters, a Franklin (Ohio) restaurant owner.
SPORTS
June 17, 1989
The man described as Pete Rose's bookmaker earned a major reduction in his sentence on drug and tax charges in Cincinnati Friday because he cooperated with federal investigators in a probe of Rose's taxes. Ronald Peters, 32, was sentenced to two years in jail by U.S. District Judge S. Arthur Spiegel on charges that carried a maximum 23-year prison term. Peters formally pleaded guilty to cocaine distribution and making a false statement on his 1985 tax return by failing to report $80,000 in gambling and bookmaking income.
SPORTS
June 10, 1989
Attorneys for Manager Pete Rose of the Cincinnati Reds aren't interested in interviewing his purported bookmaker, Ronald Peters, in preparation for Rose's scheduled hearing before the baseball commissioner June 26, Peters' lawyer said. Peters, a restaurant owner who claims he ran bets for Rose, is one of Rose's principal accusers. Peters said he would not sell his story to a publication. Meanwhile, Thomas P. Gioiosa, a former friend of Rose, has been granted a six-week postponement to July 28 in his trial on a five-count federal indictment.
SPORTS
May 11, 1989
A former friend of Pete Rose said he plans to tell a federal grand jury that the manager of the Cincinnati Reds gambled and knowingly associated with wealthy drug traffickers, the Cincinnati Post reported Wednesday. Michael Fry, among those who have linked Rose to alleged gambling, told the newspaper that he has personal knowledge that Rose was behind in payments to his bookmaker, Ronald Peters. Peters has told investigators that he "took bets over a period of two years from Rose that could very well amount to in excess of a million dollars," said Robert C. Brichler, an assistant U.S. attorney in Cleveland.
SPORTS
June 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
A federal judge today gave Ronald Peters, identified as Pete Rose's bookmaker, a greatly reduced prison sentence on cocaine and tax evasion charges. U.S. District Judge S. Arthur Spiegel credited Peters, 32, for his cooperation with federal prosecutors as he sentenced him to 24 months in jail on charges of cocaine distribution and making a false statement on his income taxes. Peters, 32, could have been sentenced to a maximum 23 years on the two charges, but federal prosecutors had asked Spiegel for a maximum 14-month sentence in return for Peters' cooperation.
SPORTS
June 13, 1989
Ronald Peters, identified as a bookmaker for Pete Rose, said he has renewed an offer of an interview without conditions to lawyers for the Cincinnati Reds manager. Rose's lawyers, who are preparing for a meeting June 26 in New York with baseball Commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti, had no comment regarding the offer.
SPORTS
June 10, 1989
Attorneys for Manager Pete Rose of the Cincinnati Reds aren't interested in interviewing his purported bookmaker, Ronald Peters, in preparation for Rose's scheduled hearing before the baseball commissioner June 26, Peters' lawyer said. Peters, a restaurant owner who claims he ran bets for Rose, is one of Rose's principal accusers. Peters said he would not sell his story to a publication. Meanwhile, Thomas P. Gioiosa, a former friend of Rose, has been granted a six-week postponement to July 28 in his trial on a five-count federal indictment.
SPORTS
May 11, 1989
A former friend of Pete Rose said he plans to tell a federal grand jury that the manager of the Cincinnati Reds gambled and knowingly associated with wealthy drug traffickers, the Cincinnati Post reported Wednesday. Michael Fry, among those who have linked Rose to alleged gambling, told the newspaper that he has personal knowledge that Rose was behind in payments to his bookmaker, Ronald Peters. Peters has told investigators that he "took bets over a period of two years from Rose that could very well amount to in excess of a million dollars," said Robert C. Brichler, an assistant U.S. attorney in Cleveland.
SPORTS
May 7, 1989 | STEVE JACOBSON, Newsday
The wheels of baseball's justice grind exceedingly slow. So slow that they present an injustice to Pete Rose and to the game the commissioner represents. Too slow. The commissioner's wheels have ground with too many squeaks of leaked information and too much official silence. What little official information has come forth has been misinformation. Blame Peter Ueberroth for leaving potentially the most unpleasant matter of his time for his successor. Blame Bart Giamatti for carrying on with Rose's guilt by innuendo as plain as the box scores on baseball's face.
SPORTS
May 6, 1989
U.S. District Judge Carl B. Rubin, who had criticized baseball's investigation of Pete Rose as a "vendetta," again removed himself from handling the criminal case of a man linked to Rose. Thomas P. Gioiosa of New Bedford, Mass., who once lived with Rose's family, faces trial on federal felony charges of tax evasion and conspiracy to distribute cocaine. Last week, Rubin disqualified himself from the sentencing of Ronald Peters, a Franklin (Ohio) restaurant owner.
SPORTS
April 25, 1989
An Ohio bookmaker, Ronald Peters, told prosecutors he took as much as $1 million in bets from Pete Rose, according to a federal transcript made public Monday. It was also learned that a letter from baseball Commissioner Bart Giamatti states that the commissioner believes the bookmaker's testimony was truthful. Nothing in the 13-page transcript indicates Rose bet on baseball games. However, Alan J. Statman, Peters' lawyer, has said his client had information linking the manager of the Cincinnati Reds to baseball betting.
SPORTS
May 7, 1989 | STEVE JACOBSON, Newsday
The wheels of baseball's justice grind exceedingly slow. So slow that they present an injustice to Pete Rose and to the game the commissioner represents. Too slow. The commissioner's wheels have ground with too many squeaks of leaked information and too much official silence. What little official information has come forth has been misinformation. Blame Peter Ueberroth for leaving potentially the most unpleasant matter of his time for his successor. Blame Bart Giamatti for carrying on with Rose's guilt by innuendo as plain as the box scores on baseball's face.
SPORTS
April 26, 1989
The judge who said last Friday that he thought there was a vendetta against Pete Rose said he would have no further comment until he sentences the Ohio bookmaker linked to the manager of the Cincinnati Reds. U.S. District Judge Carl B. Rubin said that the bookmaker, Ronald Peters, would be sentenced shortly after being convicted of cocaine trafficking and tax evasion.
SPORTS
April 25, 1989
An Ohio bookmaker, Ronald Peters, told prosecutors he took as much as $1 million in bets from Pete Rose, according to a federal transcript made public Monday. It was also learned that a letter from baseball Commissioner Bart Giamatti states that the commissioner believes the bookmaker's testimony was truthful. Nothing in the 13-page transcript indicates Rose bet on baseball games. However, Alan J. Statman, Peters' lawyer, has said his client had information linking the manager of the Cincinnati Reds to baseball betting.
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