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Ronald R Gastelum

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1999
"Plan Designed to Bring Delta Foes Together Inflames Debate Instead" (Sept. 16) misstates the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California's position regarding the controversial peripheral canal while obscuring the agency's real focus on drinking-water quality. Improved drinking-water quality has been a lost component of the Calfed process and Metropolitan has taken the position that it is a paramount priority. Every 100 milligrams of added salt per liter in our water supplies from the Bay-Delta and other sources add $100 million in associated costs to Southern Californians.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2001
The Metropolitan Water District will shut down four additional pumps along the Colorado River this summer when requested in an effort to reduce the need for rolling blackouts, agency officials said Thursday. "We already turn off some of our Colorado River Aqueduct pumps when requested by the Southern California Edison Co., freeing up enough electricity for 100,000 Southern California homes," said the water district's general manager, Ronald R. Gastelum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2005 | Anna Gorman, Times Staff Writer
The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California on Friday named Colorado River specialist Dennis B. Underwood as its chief executive officer and general manager. Underwood, known as an agency insider who has helped negotiate several controversial water deals, replaces Ronald R. Gastelum. Gastelum stepped down in December after five years of guiding the Los Angeles-based agency through water shortages and cutbacks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1999
The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is in the vortex of a debate that could determine the adequacy of Southern California's water supply for decades to come. Its ability to handle a welter of intertwined issues will determine whether the region will have the water it needs to sustain population and economic growth. Metropolitan will succeed only if it abandons its mossback approach and asserts new leadership in cooperation with the broader water community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1993 | GEOFFREY MOHAN
The San Fernando City Council has found itself in the spotlight of a regional battle over two proposed landfills, but so far hasn't made a move to join either camp in the debate. For the past few meetings, activists have asked the five-member council to join the fray over the proposed Elsmere Canyon landfill in the Santa Clarita Valley and Sunshine Canyon landfill above Granada Hills. The attention from activists has put the 2.
NEWS
March 30, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mammoth Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, under fire from Sacramento and Washington to change its ways, chose a former MWD lawyer and legislative lobbyist Monday as its new general manager. The governing board for the MWD, the nation's largest water wholesaler, selected trash hauling executive Ronald R. Gastelum, 52, to head an agency that is at the vortex of change in the water industry. He succeeds John R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1990 | STEVE PADILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long process of assessing the potential hazards and benefits of the proposed Elsmere Canyon landfill officially begins today with a public meeting in Santa Clarita which could establish some of the issues that will be covered in the environmental review of the controversial project. The meeting is the first of two public forums this week sponsored by the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1993 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The campaign against a landfill proposed for Elsmere Canyon takes a turn for the tasty this week. Having distributed the familiar protest posters and penned the customary letters to the editor, opponents said they will unveil a novel tactic today: anti-dump flyers on pizza delivery boxes. The three Domino's Pizza outlets in Santa Clarita will attach the flyers to boxes containing the 4,000 pizzas sold every week.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2004 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
The board of the Metropolitan Water District on Tuesday overwhelmingly approved a plan to pay farmers in eastern Riverside County and northeast Imperial County to stop planting on a portion of their land so irrigation water can be diverted to urban users.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1999 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Orange County residents have saved so much water after last week's pipeline burst that local reservoirs are not only remaining stable but water levels are actually rising. "It's just terrific," Keith G. Coolidge, associate general manager of the Municipal Water District of Orange County, the region's wholesale water supplier, said Saturday. "I can't stress that enough."
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