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Ronald Reagan Center For Public Affairs

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November 4, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN and KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the early 1980s, the Ronald Reagan Center for Public Affairs was described as "the living part" of a proposed library complex at Stanford University designed to honor Reagan and house his presidential papers. The actor-turned-politician and his wife, Nancy, were "particularly enthusiastic" about the prospects of an ambitious academic research center, W. Glenn Campbell, director of the Stanford-based Hoover Institution, said at the time.
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NEWS
February 15, 1993 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The private foundation that built the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library has finished paying for the bricks and mortar and is focusing on developing a public policy think tank to carry the torch of Reagan-style conservatism. The final $2-million payment on the $57-million hilltop complex was delivered this month, said John J. Midgley, executive director of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1993 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The private foundation that built the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library near Simi Valley has finished paying for the bricks and mortar and is now focused on developing a public policy think tank to carry the torch of Reagan-style conservatism. The final $2-million payment on the $57-million hilltop complex was delivered earlier this month, said John J. Midgley, executive director of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1993 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The private foundation that built the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library near Simi Valley has finished paying for the bricks and mortar and is now focused on developing a public policy think tank to carry the torch of Reagan-style conservatism. The final $2-million payment on the $57-million hilltop complex was delivered earlier this month, said John J. Midgley, executive director of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation.
NEWS
February 15, 1993 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The private foundation that built the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library has finished paying for the bricks and mortar and is focusing on developing a public policy think tank to carry the torch of Reagan-style conservatism. The final $2-million payment on the $57-million hilltop complex was delivered this month, said John J. Midgley, executive director of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1992 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN
John J. Midgley, a scholar at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh, has been named the first executive director of the Ronald Reagan Center for Public Affairs. The center's offices are on the grounds of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library near Simi Valley, but it is funded privately by the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation. Midgley's appointment was announced Monday by the former president and Lodwrick M. Cook, chairman of the Reagan foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1997 | MACK REED
Former First Lady Nancy Reagan plans to spend part of the day after her 45th wedding anniversary at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library on Wednesday, signing copies of her autobiography, library officials say. Ronald Reagan and Nancy Davis married on March 4, 1952, at the Little Brown Church in the Valley. The late actor, William Holden, served as Ronald Reagan's best man, while his wife, Ardis Holden, was Nancy Davis' matron of honor. Nancy Reagan will be in the museum bookshop from 10:30 a.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1992 | KENNETH R. WEISS
Charles H. Jelloian, operations director of the private foundation that built the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, said he will leave to pursue other interests and possibly run for political office. Jelloian, 32, of Northridge said he is not ruling out a bid for Congress, the Assembly or state Senate this year. "I hope that someday political office is in my future," he said. "I'm not ruling out anything."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1994 | MARY F. POLS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Secretary of State George P. Shultz blasted President Clinton's policy in Bosnia on Monday at a conference at the Ronald Reagan Center for Public Affairs. "Neville Chamberlain step aside, we have a new nominee for No. 1 diplomat," Shultz said, referring to the former British prime minister's appeasement of Adolf Hitler following Germany's invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1938. Shultz's off-the-cuff remark came at the end of a passionate response he was giving to a question on U. S.
NEWS
January 1, 1992 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last of Ronald Reagan's longtime political associates has quit the board that built Reagan's presidential library, expressing disappointment that other close advisers squeezed out this year would not be reappointed. In a letter to the former President, former Energy Secretary John S. Herrington resigned from the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation that raised $60 million for the library near Simi Valley. Herrington was the only longtime Reagan associate spared last April when former U.S.
NEWS
November 4, 1991 | PAUL FELDMAN and KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the early 1980s, the Ronald Reagan Center for Public Affairs was described as "the living part" of a proposed library complex at Stanford University designed to honor Reagan and house his presidential papers. The actor-turned-politician and his wife, Nancy, were "particularly enthusiastic" about the prospects of an ambitious academic research center, W. Glenn Campbell, director of the Stanford-based Hoover Institution, said at the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1994 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After several fitful starts, the Ronald Reagan Center for Public Affairs will hold its first major conference at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library next Monday, featuring former Secretary of State George Schultz as the keynote speaker. The conference, entitled "Perils of Democracy," will focus on the economic and political changes taking place in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, said Lynda Schuler, deputy director of the Center for Public Affairs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1993 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From a sun-streaked hilltop in Simi Valley, over an elegant dessert of blackberries and cream, a dozen American academics and Russian politicians plotted Monday to rescue a bedraggled ex-superpower. Still jet-lagged after a stop in Washington, four Russian lawmakers tried to convey the gritty rough-and-tumble realities of Moscow politics to the American economists and professors gathered at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library on Monday.
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