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Ronald Rinaldi

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NEWS
June 25, 1988 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Assembly and Senate budget negotiators, intent on cutting $1.4 billion from the proposed $45-billion state budget, sharply cut proposed spending increases for state colleges and universities Friday, and slashed even deeper into Gov. George Deukmejian's programs. The Democrat-dominated six-member budget conference committee reduced the University of California budget by $75 million, a cut of 3.7%. The committee cut the California State University system budget by the same 3.7%, a $56.
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NEWS
June 25, 1988 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Assembly and Senate budget negotiators, intent on cutting $1.4 billion from the proposed $45-billion state budget, sharply cut proposed spending increases for state colleges and universities Friday, and slashed even deeper into Gov. George Deukmejian's programs. The Democrat-dominated six-member budget conference committee reduced the University of California budget by $75 million, a cut of 3.7%. The committee cut the California State University system budget by the same 3.7%, a $56.
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NATIONAL
December 26, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
This George Washington could not make it across the Delaware River. Ronald Rinaldi III was prepared to play the role of the military leader whose 1776 Christmas night crossing led to a rout of British-led forces in Trenton and revived the downtrodden Continental forces. Rinaldi, 45, had taken part in every reenactment of the crossing since 1976. But this year, reenactors were done in by the river's strong currents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Lame-duck Gov. George Deukmejian on Friday named his chief of staff, Michael R. Frost, to a $95,000-a-year position on a newly created board that oversees garbage disposal, recycling and other waste management issues. Frost is the second top official in the outgoing Deukmejian Administration to get one of the lucrative jobs on the Integrated Waste Management Board. The posts were established as part of compromise legislation in 1989.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Assembly and Senate budget negotiators, intent on cutting $1.4 billion from the proposed $45-billion state budget, sharply cut proposed spending increases for state colleges and universities Friday, and slashed even deeper into Gov. George Deukmejian's programs. The Democrat-dominated six-member budget conference committee reduced the University of California budget by $75 million, a cut of 3.7%. The committee cut the California State University system budget by the same 3.7%, a $56.
NEWS
May 1, 1987 | TED ROHRLICH and HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Staff Writers
About a third of the state hygienists who watch for chemical hazards in the workplace have quit their jobs at the state's job safety agency as a result of Gov. George Deukmejian's vow to abolish the department on July 1. One of the hygienists was being sought Thursday on criminal charges that he repeatedly threatened to kill the governor and injure other top state officials because of the roles they are playing in the agency's prospective demise.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
State officials will resume enforcement of job safety and health laws at California's private sector workplaces on May 1, California and federal authorities jointly announced Monday in San Francisco. The announcement was the product of lengthy negotiations and an outgrowth of the victory last November of an initiative--Proposition 97--to restore the state program. The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration assumed responsibility for protecting California's 10.5 million private sector workers on July 1, 1987.
NEWS
July 29, 1988 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
A class-action lawsuit was filed Thursday to end California's 200,000-case backlog of workers' compensation claims. So great is the backlog that the state Department of Industrial Relations measures unprocessed claims in terms of linear feet. At last count in March, there were 384 feet of unprocessed claims, 152 of which were recorded in the Los Angeles office. The suit said two other offices with large backlogs are Van Nuys, with 78 feet of unprocessed claims, and Santa Ana, with 66-plus feet.
NEWS
June 4, 1985 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
The California Occupational Safety and Health Administration is under federal investigation over allegations that it failed to protect "whistle-blowers" who speak out about health and safety problems on the job, U.S. Labor Department officials confirmed Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1991 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Diego Zoological Society could be forced to refund more than $500,000 to the state because it cannot account for hundreds of hours of training it was supposed to give zookeepers under a state-sponsored program, according to an audit released Friday. The audit, conducted for the state's Employment Training Panel, also found that the zoo submitted time sheets that showed 27 employees performed on-the-job training exercises when they were actually on vacation or sick leave.
NEWS
November 20, 1988 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
In less than a month, the Compton Lazben Hotel is due to open its doors to a crowd of proud local dignitaries and boosters for the city's centennial ball. The celebration has been billed as the city's social event of the season: a chance to marvel at a $30-million crown jewel of the city's redevelopment efforts alongside the Artesia Freeway.
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