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Ronald S Lushing

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1989 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Tom Bradley on Friday appointed real estate developer and political fund-raiser Ronald S. Lushing to the city's powerful Board of Harbor Commissioners, filling a vacancy created last week by the resignation of Ira Distenfield. Lushing, 57, is currently president of the Board of Library Commissioners. He is also a partner in Parkhill Partners, which is developing a mixed-use project in downtown Los Angeles called Metropolis, and is owner of the real estate investment and consulting firm of Ronald S. Lushing & Associates.
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REAL ESTATE
October 17, 1993
Leon Whiteson ("More Is Less," Oct. 3) never did like the library design. We've always known that. His critical review is remarkably whiny considering that he was a member of the Urban Design Advisory Committee (UDAC), which advised the Cultural Affairs Department on architectural matters. The library is the most important public building to be completed in the city of Los Angeles in many decades. It has weathered a tedious design review that has included librarians, preservationists, community activists, bureaucrats and politicians.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1989
The appointment of developer Ronald S. Lushing to the city's Board of Harbor Commissioners was unanimously approved Tuesday by the Los Angeles City Council. Lushing, president of the Board of Library Commissioners and former finance chairman for Mayor Tom Bradley's 1986 gubernatorial campaign, will fill a spot left vacant last month by Ira Distenfield. Distenfield resigned after press inquiries into his financial affairs. Lushing will fill the remainder of Distenfield's term, which ends June 30, 1992.
OPINION
April 4, 1993
I must respond to your series of articles regarding the travel plans of the Port of Los Angeles. They have been inaccurate, based on press releases of two politicians who are seeking reelection. In the last 15 years the Port of Los Angeles has grown from 14th to our nation's largest and most successful port. We are the seventh largest port in the world. We now handle more than 2,300,000 containers a year, more than 850,000 cruise passengers per year (the largest terminal on the West Coast)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1987
Your editorial "From the Ashes" (Nov. 3) set forth the problems and hopes of the Los Angeles Central Library with fairness and comprehension. Your support in recognizing the benefit of this unique public and private project for our city was accurate, thoughtful and timely. The City Council has approved a budget of $152.4 million and our funding, including a temporary Central Library, seems assured. We have resolved the confusion over the design and the project is again proceeding.
OPINION
April 4, 1993
I must respond to your series of articles regarding the travel plans of the Port of Los Angeles. They have been inaccurate, based on press releases of two politicians who are seeking reelection. In the last 15 years the Port of Los Angeles has grown from 14th to our nation's largest and most successful port. We are the seventh largest port in the world. We now handle more than 2,300,000 containers a year, more than 850,000 cruise passengers per year (the largest terminal on the West Coast)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1988
Your article "Getting Through the Door" (June 14) does not fairly set forth what true access to the mayor is all about. What was ignored is the only pertinent fact as it relates to my access to Bradley--I am president of the Board of Library Commissioners. Our board has been dutiful in dealing with a myriad of problems as they relate to the Central Library and the 62 branch libraries throughout our city. I am sure you will recall that in 1986, in April and September, we experienced two disastrous and heartbreaking arson fires, thereby closing our Central Library.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1991
In a recent article (Oct. 29), Port of Los Angeles travel expenditures for the past six fiscal years were criticized as excessive. I'm encouraged that The Times mentioned that we at the port consider meetings with existing and potential tenants essential to our success. It is. Discussion of travel expenses, as we all know, by themselves is meaningless. We must correlate additional variables to attain statistical legitimacy. Let me add to the information in the article toward a better understanding of the facts.
REAL ESTATE
October 17, 1993
Leon Whiteson ("More Is Less," Oct. 3) never did like the library design. We've always known that. His critical review is remarkably whiny considering that he was a member of the Urban Design Advisory Committee (UDAC), which advised the Cultural Affairs Department on architectural matters. The library is the most important public building to be completed in the city of Los Angeles in many decades. It has weathered a tedious design review that has included librarians, preservationists, community activists, bureaucrats and politicians.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | RICH CONNELL and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Several of Mayor Tom Bradley's appointees helped raise Bradley political contributions from contractors and others with business before their city commissions, according to previously undisclosed campaign records. State conflict-of-interest law prohibits commissioners from soliciting donations of $250 or more from anyone seeking their agencies' approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1991
In a recent article (Oct. 29), Port of Los Angeles travel expenditures for the past six fiscal years were criticized as excessive. I'm encouraged that The Times mentioned that we at the port consider meetings with existing and potential tenants essential to our success. It is. Discussion of travel expenses, as we all know, by themselves is meaningless. We must correlate additional variables to attain statistical legitimacy. Let me add to the information in the article toward a better understanding of the facts.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | RICH CONNELL and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Several of Mayor Tom Bradley's appointees helped raise Bradley political contributions from contractors and others with business before their city commissions, according to previously undisclosed campaign records. State conflict-of-interest law prohibits commissioners from soliciting donations of $250 or more from anyone seeking their agencies' approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1989
The appointment of developer Ronald S. Lushing to the city's Board of Harbor Commissioners was unanimously approved Tuesday by the Los Angeles City Council. Lushing, president of the Board of Library Commissioners and former finance chairman for Mayor Tom Bradley's 1986 gubernatorial campaign, will fill a spot left vacant last month by Ira Distenfield. Distenfield resigned after press inquiries into his financial affairs. Lushing will fill the remainder of Distenfield's term, which ends June 30, 1992.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1989 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
Mayor Tom Bradley on Friday appointed real estate developer and political fund-raiser Ronald S. Lushing to the city's powerful Board of Harbor Commissioners, filling a vacancy created last week by the resignation of Ira Distenfield. Lushing, 57, is currently president of the Board of Library Commissioners. He is also a partner in Parkhill Partners, which is developing a mixed-use project in downtown Los Angeles called Metropolis, and is owner of the real estate investment and consulting firm of Ronald S. Lushing & Associates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1988
Your article "Getting Through the Door" (June 14) does not fairly set forth what true access to the mayor is all about. What was ignored is the only pertinent fact as it relates to my access to Bradley--I am president of the Board of Library Commissioners. Our board has been dutiful in dealing with a myriad of problems as they relate to the Central Library and the 62 branch libraries throughout our city. I am sure you will recall that in 1986, in April and September, we experienced two disastrous and heartbreaking arson fires, thereby closing our Central Library.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1987
Your editorial "From the Ashes" (Nov. 3) set forth the problems and hopes of the Los Angeles Central Library with fairness and comprehension. Your support in recognizing the benefit of this unique public and private project for our city was accurate, thoughtful and timely. The City Council has approved a budget of $152.4 million and our funding, including a temporary Central Library, seems assured. We have resolved the confusion over the design and the project is again proceeding.
NEWS
September 3, 1987
Ronald S. Lushing, an investor who is chairman and president of Westcoast Savings and Loan Assn., has been elected to a fourth one-year term as president of the Los Angeles City Board of Library Commissioners. Lushing has served on the board since 1984. Mayor Tom Bradley recently appointed him to a five-year term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1991
Mayor Tom Bradley has appointed the city's 244 commissioners. Records show that at least 107 commissioners have contributed a total of $673,661 to the mayor's various political campaigns from 1983 through 1989. The following commissioners account for the bulk of the donations. (Related story, A1) COMMISSIONER COMMISSION CONTRIBUTION Ronald S.
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