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Ronald Siegel

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NEWS
August 14, 1989 | BOB SIPCHEN, Times Staff Writer
Stoned, smashed, bombed, tight, tipsy, tanked, stewed, plastered, looped, blotto, swacked, schnockered, fried, ripped, besotted, blasted, shikker, reeling, soused, soaked, canned, potted, bent, crocked, shellacked, squiffy, jug-bitten, oiled, polluted, raddled, high, lit, loaded, stinko, pie-eyed. There are reportedly more synonyms for intoxication than any word in the English language. For good reason.
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NEWS
July 12, 1994 | BETTYANN KEVLES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Somehow I wasn't surprised to learn in "Whispers," Ronald Siegel's third book about the world of mental illness, that the UCLA Center for Health Sciences is the third-largest building in the world. I have been lost in its labyrinthine corridors and appreciate the author's courage in descending to its basement, at night, on the advice of a virtual stranger who had promised him an opportunity to interview Hitler's brain (safely inside a computer program).
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BOOKS
August 13, 1989
Lee Dembart's review of Ronald Siegel's book, "Intoxication," (Book Review, July 23), while well intentioned, misstates the major point. Never in the book did Siegel describe marijuana, cocaine or LSD as safe or "healthy and natural." He clearly states that these drugs, while appealing to a section of society, are potentially dangerous. In fact, he argues that such accepted drugs as caffeine are unsafe. Siegel's premise is that we have a clearly documented "fourth drive" for intoxication.
NEWS
August 31, 1989
Ronald Siegel's theory on drugs ("Artificial Paradise," by Bob Sipchen, Aug. 14) was interesting and correct when stating "Just say no" is woefully inadequate. I also agree that every society, from the most primitive to the most sophisticated has had a need to alter consciousness--like the great American ritual of getting drunk on New Year's Eve. However, Siegel does not seem to take into account the fact that most people alter consciousness only occasionally--like one takes an aspirin for a headache.
NEWS
August 31, 1989
Ronald Siegel's theory on drugs ("Artificial Paradise," by Bob Sipchen, Aug. 14) was interesting and correct when stating "Just say no" is woefully inadequate. I also agree that every society, from the most primitive to the most sophisticated has had a need to alter consciousness--like the great American ritual of getting drunk on New Year's Eve. However, Siegel does not seem to take into account the fact that most people alter consciousness only occasionally--like one takes an aspirin for a headache.
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | BETTYANN KEVLES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Somehow I wasn't surprised to learn in "Whispers," Ronald Siegel's third book about the world of mental illness, that the UCLA Center for Health Sciences is the third-largest building in the world. I have been lost in its labyrinthine corridors and appreciate the author's courage in descending to its basement, at night, on the advice of a virtual stranger who had promised him an opportunity to interview Hitler's brain (safely inside a computer program).
BOOKS
July 23, 1989 | Lee Dembart, Dembart reviews regularly for View
For the last several years our country has been in a state of alarm over drug use, and much speech-making and money-spending have ensued. What all of this accomplishes is anybody's guess, but it doesn't seem to have had much effect on the use of mind-altering drugs, which continues apparently unabated. Now comes Ronald K.
NEWS
March 24, 1995 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lightning shot through the telephone and into Dannion Brinkley's body, welding the nails in his shoes to the nails in the floor--and sending his soul on one of the most bizarre near-death sojourns ever recounted. According to his best-selling book, "Saved by the Light," Brinkley traveled to a luminous crystal city where he met 13 silver-blue spirit beings, learned of calamities in store for the Earth and saw his entire life flash before him. Or so the story goes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1990
For illustrating the opposing mentalities and styles of the doves and the hawks in the war on drugs, your juxtaposition of articles March 15 ("It's a Drive as Natural as Food or Sex" by Ronald Siegel and "Some Among Us Would Seek to Surrender" by Daryl Gates) is the best yet in your series. Siegel, a psychopharmacologist at the UCLA School of Medicine, after a professional lifetime studying drugs, has logically worked from facts to a sensible conclusion (" . . .
BOOKS
February 23, 1992 | ALEX RAKSIN
FIRE IN THE BRAIN: Clinical Tales of Hallucination by Ronald K. Siegel (Dutton: $21; 256 pp.). Behind a burst of golden light, Moses appears, riding a bicycle and then exiting stage left. Following him is a throng of 39 tiny Moseses, riding tricycles with twinkling lights. Then a mountain springs up from the stage, and Porky Pig bursts from the top, stuttering, "That's all folks!" Finally, a black curtain descends bearing dozens of eyes.
NEWS
August 14, 1989 | BOB SIPCHEN, Times Staff Writer
Stoned, smashed, bombed, tight, tipsy, tanked, stewed, plastered, looped, blotto, swacked, schnockered, fried, ripped, besotted, blasted, shikker, reeling, soused, soaked, canned, potted, bent, crocked, shellacked, squiffy, jug-bitten, oiled, polluted, raddled, high, lit, loaded, stinko, pie-eyed. There are reportedly more synonyms for intoxication than any word in the English language. For good reason.
BOOKS
August 13, 1989
Lee Dembart's review of Ronald Siegel's book, "Intoxication," (Book Review, July 23), while well intentioned, misstates the major point. Never in the book did Siegel describe marijuana, cocaine or LSD as safe or "healthy and natural." He clearly states that these drugs, while appealing to a section of society, are potentially dangerous. In fact, he argues that such accepted drugs as caffeine are unsafe. Siegel's premise is that we have a clearly documented "fourth drive" for intoxication.
BOOKS
July 23, 1989 | Lee Dembart, Dembart reviews regularly for View
For the last several years our country has been in a state of alarm over drug use, and much speech-making and money-spending have ensued. What all of this accomplishes is anybody's guess, but it doesn't seem to have had much effect on the use of mind-altering drugs, which continues apparently unabated. Now comes Ronald K.
OPINION
March 21, 2005
Re "Truth Is, Bush's Propaganda Hurts the U.S.," Commentary, March 16: The White House is producing so much propaganda these days that news channels may have to start labeling their product with tags such as, "This report was NOT paid for by the Bush administration." Rob Schmidt Culver City When are you, along with the broadcast "news" networks, going to do a special edition on Bush administration propaganda? Perhaps you could title it "Pravda." That seems to be an appropriate name for today's American "news" media.
NEWS
March 25, 1986 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
In the 1960s and early 1970s, most of the marijuana smoked in the country was smuggled in from northern Mexico. The botanical techniques were primitive and the potency was low. Then the United States' crackdown on Mexican marijuana forced smugglers to go elsewhere for their pot, said Ronald Siegel, a psychopharmacologist at the UCLA School of Medicine. More potent marijuana from southern Mexico, Colombia and Thailand began hitting the streets.
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