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Ronald Sugar

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BUSINESS
September 21, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Northrop Grumman Corp. said Thursday that it has named Ronald D. Sugar president. That puts the former Litton Industries executive in line to succeed Kent Kresa, the company's longtime chairman and chief executive. Sugar, 53, joined Los Angeles-based Northrop in April as a corporate vice president after the company acquired cross-town rival Litton, where he had been president and chief operating officer.
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BUSINESS
November 18, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Apple Inc. on Wednesday said it had appointed former Northrop Grumman Corp. Chief Executive Ronald D. Sugar to its board. Sugar, 62, who headed the Century City aerospace giant from 2003 until his retirement this year, will serve as chairman of Apple's audit and finance committee. Before taking over at Northrop, he was an executive with Southland defense contractors TRW Inc. and Litton Industries Inc. In his tenure as Northrop's chief executive, Sugar helped acquire nearly two dozen companies with interests in virtually every aspect of the U.S. military, including building spy satellites and nuclear submarines, managing websites and protecting computer systems against hackers.
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BUSINESS
September 17, 2009 | W.J. Hennigan
Surprising industry observers, Northrop Grumman Corp. Chairman and Chief Executive Ronald D. Sugar said he was stepping down following a six-year tenure in which he was credited with helping turn the Century City company into one of the world's largest defense contractors. Sugar, 61, said he would relinquish his posts by the end of the year but continue to advise the company until his retirement in June. Wesley G. Bush, Northrop's president and chief operating officer, will replace Sugar, effective Jan. 1. The announcement, which came amid prospects of a slowdown in Pentagon spending, fueled Wall Street speculation that Northrop's board might have forced Sugar's departure.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Since taking the helm of Northrop Grumman Corp. in January, Wesley G. Bush hasn't wasted any time shaking up one of the world's largest military contractors. On his first day on the job, Bush made a stunning announcement that he was moving Northrop's headquarters out of Los Angeles — where the company has been since it was founded in 1939 — to the Washington area. He then pulled Northrop out of the Pentagon's $35-billion aerial refueling tanker competition, shuffled top executives and this week announced he was looking at abandoning the company's $6-billion-a-year shipbuilding business.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2009 | Peter Pae
Much like Northrop Grumman Corp.'s stealthy B-2 bomber, the company's chief executive has flown under the radar for most of his career overseeing the development of many of the nation's top-secret weapons. Unassuming and devoid of the cigar-chomping flamboyance that distinguished aerospace executives in the past, Ronald Sugar -- a former whiz kid from South Los Angeles -- often shuns the limelight. Yet few in aerospace are as influential to the nation's defense and security.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Ronald Sugar, the chief executive of defense contractor Northrop Grumman Corp., saw his compensation decline nearly 8% in 2007, even as the Century City-based company's stock price climbed, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing. Sugar got $17.2 million, most of it in stock and options awards totaling about $11.9 million. He received $1.5 million in salary, a $3.1-million performance-based bonus and about $700,000 in other compensation.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Northrop Grumman Corp., the world's largest maker of warships, paid Chief Executive Ronald Sugar $6.91 million in 2004, an 18% increase over the previous year. He also received 250,000 options worth $3.79 million. Sugar, 56, earned $1.28 million in salary in 2004, compared with $1.04 million in 2003, the Century City-based company said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Sugar's bonus climbed 17% to $3.1 million.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Northrop Grumman Corp. Chairman and Chief Executive Ronald D. Sugar received a compensation package for 2006 valued by the Century City-based defense contractor at $18.6 million. Sugar's compensation package included a salary of $1.4 million, stocks and options valued at $13.7 million when they were awarded, non-equity incentive plan compensation of $3.1 million and other compensation of $416,857, Northrop Grumman said in a proxy statement.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2005 | From Reuters
Northrop Grumman Corp. Chairman and Chief Executive Ronald D. Sugar earned $4.4 million in salary and bonus last year, up 19% from 2003, according to a regulatory filing Tuesday. Century City-based Northrop, which makes warships, missiles, radar equipment and the Global Hawk spy plane, said in its annual proxy filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that Sugar earned a salary and bonus of $3.7 million in 2003. Sugar's total package last year, including $2.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Since taking the helm of Northrop Grumman Corp. in January, Wesley G. Bush hasn't wasted any time shaking up one of the world's largest military contractors. On his first day on the job, Bush made a stunning announcement that he was moving Northrop's headquarters out of Los Angeles — where the company has been since it was founded in 1939 — to the Washington area. He then pulled Northrop out of the Pentagon's $35-billion aerial refueling tanker competition, shuffled top executives and this week announced he was looking at abandoning the company's $6-billion-a-year shipbuilding business.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2009 | W.J. Hennigan
Surprising industry observers, Northrop Grumman Corp. Chairman and Chief Executive Ronald D. Sugar said he was stepping down following a six-year tenure in which he was credited with helping turn the Century City company into one of the world's largest defense contractors. Sugar, 61, said he would relinquish his posts by the end of the year but continue to advise the company until his retirement in June. Wesley G. Bush, Northrop's president and chief operating officer, will replace Sugar, effective Jan. 1. The announcement, which came amid prospects of a slowdown in Pentagon spending, fueled Wall Street speculation that Northrop's board might have forced Sugar's departure.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2009 | Peter Pae
In between running a $34-billion business with operations in 50 states and 25 countries, Northrop Grumman Corp. Chief Executive Ronald Sugar recently penned a business book with longtime mentor Simon Ramo, co-founder of and the "R" in TRW Corp., now part of Northrop. The book, "Strategic Business Forecasting," is Sugar's first but Ramo's 16th. Despite its rather technical title, it can be a helpful read not just for corporate strategists but for almost anyone looking ahead.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2009 | Peter Pae
Much like Northrop Grumman Corp.'s stealthy B-2 bomber, the company's chief executive has flown under the radar for most of his career overseeing the development of many of the nation's top-secret weapons. Unassuming and devoid of the cigar-chomping flamboyance that distinguished aerospace executives in the past, Ronald Sugar -- a former whiz kid from South Los Angeles -- often shuns the limelight. Yet few in aerospace are as influential to the nation's defense and security.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Ronald Sugar, the chief executive of defense contractor Northrop Grumman Corp., saw his compensation decline nearly 8% in 2007, even as the Century City-based company's stock price climbed, according to a Securities and Exchange Commission filing. Sugar got $17.2 million, most of it in stock and options awards totaling about $11.9 million. He received $1.5 million in salary, a $3.1-million performance-based bonus and about $700,000 in other compensation.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Northrop Grumman Corp. Chairman and Chief Executive Ronald D. Sugar received a compensation package for 2006 valued by the Century City-based defense contractor at $18.6 million. Sugar's compensation package included a salary of $1.4 million, stocks and options valued at $13.7 million when they were awarded, non-equity incentive plan compensation of $3.1 million and other compensation of $416,857, Northrop Grumman said in a proxy statement.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2006 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Northrop Grumman Corp. is expected to announce today that Chief Financial Officer Wesley G. Bush will take on the additional role of president, making the 45-year-old the heir apparent at the nation's third-largest defense contractor. The promotion marks an extraordinary corporate climb for Bush, a boyish-looking executive who was named chief financial officer less than a year ago after serving as the youngest head of a division at the Century City-based company.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2006 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Northrop Grumman Corp. is expected to announce today that Chief Financial Officer Wesley G. Bush will take on the additional role of president, making the 45-year-old the heir apparent at the nation's third-largest defense contractor. The promotion marks an extraordinary corporate climb for Bush, a boyish-looking executive who was named chief financial officer less than a year ago after serving as the youngest head of a division at the Century City-based company.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2009 | Peter Pae
In between running a $34-billion business with operations in 50 states and 25 countries, Northrop Grumman Corp. Chief Executive Ronald Sugar recently penned a business book with longtime mentor Simon Ramo, co-founder of and the "R" in TRW Corp., now part of Northrop. The book, "Strategic Business Forecasting," is Sugar's first but Ramo's 16th. Despite its rather technical title, it can be a helpful read not just for corporate strategists but for almost anyone looking ahead.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2005 | From Reuters
Northrop Grumman Corp. Chairman and Chief Executive Ronald D. Sugar earned $4.4 million in salary and bonus last year, up 19% from 2003, according to a regulatory filing Tuesday. Century City-based Northrop, which makes warships, missiles, radar equipment and the Global Hawk spy plane, said in its annual proxy filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission that Sugar earned a salary and bonus of $3.7 million in 2003. Sugar's total package last year, including $2.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Northrop Grumman Corp., the world's largest maker of warships, paid Chief Executive Ronald Sugar $6.91 million in 2004, an 18% increase over the previous year. He also received 250,000 options worth $3.79 million. Sugar, 56, earned $1.28 million in salary in 2004, compared with $1.04 million in 2003, the Century City-based company said in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Sugar's bonus climbed 17% to $3.1 million.
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