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Ronald T Rinaldi

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NEWS
November 30, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
In response to voter approval of Proposition 97, the Deukmejian Administration announced late Tuesday that it will reinstate Cal/OSHA, the state program to protect the safety and health of California's 9.5 million private-sector workers. Ronald T. Rinaldi, the state's director of industrial relations, one of the prime opponents of Proposition 97, announced that $8.5 million will be spent in the current fiscal year, ending June 30, to restore Cal/OSHA.
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NEWS
November 30, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
In response to voter approval of Proposition 97, the Deukmejian Administration announced late Tuesday that it will reinstate Cal/OSHA, the state program to protect the safety and health of California's 9.5 million private-sector workers. Ronald T. Rinaldi, the state's director of industrial relations, one of the prime opponents of Proposition 97, announced that $8.5 million will be spent in the current fiscal year, ending June 30, to restore Cal/OSHA.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
Lame-duck Gov. George Deukmejian on Friday named his chief of staff, Michael R. Frost, to a $95,000-a-year position on a newly created board that oversees garbage disposal, recycling and other waste management issues. Frost is the second top official in the outgoing Deukmejian Administration to get one of the lucrative jobs on the Integrated Waste Management Board. The posts were established as part of compromise legislation in 1989.
NEWS
June 4, 1985 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
The California Occupational Safety and Health Administration is under federal investigation over allegations that it failed to protect "whistle-blowers" who speak out about health and safety problems on the job, U.S. Labor Department officials confirmed Monday.
NEWS
November 20, 1988 | CHRIS WOODYARD, Times Staff Writer
In less than a month, the Compton Lazben Hotel is due to open its doors to a crowd of proud local dignitaries and boosters for the city's centennial ball. The celebration has been billed as the city's social event of the season: a chance to marvel at a $30-million crown jewel of the city's redevelopment efforts alongside the Artesia Freeway.
NEWS
January 15, 1987 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Democratic legislators opposed to Gov. George Deukmejian's plan to abolish the state job safety agency and hand over worker safety supervision to the federal government launched their attack on the proposal Wednesday with the assertion that it would leave many California workers with "significantly less protection." Assemblyman Richard E. Floyd (D-Hawthorne) and state Sen.
NEWS
October 14, 1988 | DOUGLAS SHUIT and HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Staff Writers
Gov. George Deukmejian said Thursday that sponsors of Proposition 97, the worker-safety initiative, are using "misleading" statistics to bolster their claims that more workers have died since he cut funds for Cal/OSHA, the safety and health program for California's 9.5 million private sector workers, from the state budget. Deukmejian, taping a KCBS News Conference program that will be shown at 5 p.m.
NEWS
October 27, 1987 | DOUGLAS SHUIT and CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writers
A state appellate court Monday ruled against Gov. George Deukmejian and ordered restoration of the Cal/OSHA worker safety program that he had dismantled, according to the lawyer who led the case against the governor. Ralph Abascal, attorney for California Rural Legal Assistance, which is suing Deukmejian and the Department of Industrial Relations on behalf of a group of farm workers and labor groups, said: "The court clerk called and told us that we won."
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
It is insurance companies--not doctors, lawyers or injured workers--who are profiting most from the workers' compensation insurance system, a new report by the state auditor general said Wednesday. Democratic lawmakers who released the report say it "shatters the myth" that doctors and lawyers are ones most responsible for the soaring costs of the state's troubled $6-billion workers' compensation system.
NEWS
November 10, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
California officials Wednesday began the task of doing something that has never been done before in the state--restoring a government program whose funding has been abolished by the governor. On Tuesday, the state's electorate by a margin of 54% to 46% approved Proposition 97, which requires Gov. George Deukmejian to restore funding for Cal/OSHA, the state's private sector worker safety and health program. A.
NEWS
January 14, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
In an escalation of the controversy over widespread noncompliance with the law requiring safety licensing of firms that remove asbestos, Controller Gray Davis announced Wednesday that he will not pay bills submitted by unlicensed contractors for asbestos removal at state buildings. Davis said at a press conference that the state paid at least $2.2 million for asbestos removal in 1987, but that he is unsure how much of that went to unlicensed firms.
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