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Ronald Takaki

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September 24, 1989 | Bharati Mukherjee, Mukherjee's last book, "The Middleman & Other Stories," won the 1988 National Book Critics' Circle Award. A novel, "Jasmine" (Grove Press), will be published later this month. and
On a February morning in 1988, in a large, dingy chamber of the federal District Court House in Manhattan, a clerk handed me my Certificate of Naturalization listing my height, weight, color of eyes ("brown"), hair ("black") and complexion ("medium"), then a judge led me and more than 150 other petitioners (most of whom seemed to be of "medium" or "dark" complexion) through the pledge of allegiance and pronounced us legitimate Americans.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Ronald T. Takaki, a prolific and controversial scholar who helped pioneer the field of ethnic studies and wrote animated histories about blacks, Asians, Latinos and other marginalized Americans during four decades on the UC Berkeley faculty, has died. He was 70. Takaki killed himself at his Berkeley home Tuesday, his son Troy said. The scholar had struggled for nearly 20 years with multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating neurological disease for which there is no cure.
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NEWS
June 13, 2000 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The timing is right for a history like this. The World War II generation is dying out, and America has reacted with a wave of patriotic nostalgia. Books such as Tom Brokaw's "The Greatest Generation" and movies such as "Saving Private Ryan" are celebrating the "good war" against the Axis and the virtues that won it as they haven't been celebrated in decades.
NEWS
June 13, 2000 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The timing is right for a history like this. The World War II generation is dying out, and America has reacted with a wave of patriotic nostalgia. Books such as Tom Brokaw's "The Greatest Generation" and movies such as "Saving Private Ryan" are celebrating the "good war" against the Axis and the virtues that won it as they haven't been celebrated in decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Ronald T. Takaki, a prolific and controversial scholar who helped pioneer the field of ethnic studies and wrote animated histories about blacks, Asians, Latinos and other marginalized Americans during four decades on the UC Berkeley faculty, has died. He was 70. Takaki killed himself at his Berkeley home Tuesday, his son Troy said. The scholar had struggled for nearly 20 years with multiple sclerosis, a potentially debilitating neurological disease for which there is no cure.
NEWS
October 29, 1989
I've just had the opportunity to read Bharati Mukherjee's review of Ronald Takaki's "Strangers From a Different Shore" (Book Review, Sept. 24). As an Asian-American writer myself, I have two bones to pick: (1) Mukherjee doesn't point out that Takaki's title is misleading: His book deals mainly with Chinese and Japanese, excluding other Asians, such as Mukherjee and me.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1992
The "melting pot" theory held that all Americans could and should seek to blend the nation's various cultures. The problem was that too often Americans were melted down for a single mold--European Christian. Sameness was valued, differentness scorned. The more recently in-vogue "particularism" approach tells Americans that they should understand and place value on their particular ethnicity and culture to boost their ethnic pride and self-esteem.
NEWS
July 29, 1994 | David Wharton
James Nottage, chief curator for the Gene Autry Western Heritage Museum "A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America," by Ronald Takaki. "Takaki looks at a variety of groups--Irish, African Americans, Asians--primarily from their own voices. It looks at their perspective of American history in a way that's lively and emotional and also reminds us of some of the shameful episodes in our history. I think that, in L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1998
Why can't Ronald Takaki ("Set Up a Lottery for UC's Top Applicants," Commentary, April 2) get it through his head that Californians want UC students to be admitted on merit alone, and not because of race, luck or any other method he may devise. Naturally, students of wealthier, suburban school districts enjoy advantages, but why begrudge them? The voters have spoken, Mr. Takaki. When will you begin listening? MARTIN MULVIHILL Costa Mesa The sociopolitical ideology currently controlling college campuses is very clearly identified by statements made in "Acceptance of Blacks, Latinos to UC Plunges" (April 1)
BOOKS
October 1, 1989 | Bharati Mukherjee
"Given the documented flight of Anglos from Southern California in the '80s and the increasingly reactionary stance of the urban white middle class, this book should be required reading on campuses."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1998
Re "The Meaning of Fewer Minorities at UC, UCLA," by James Q. Wilson, Opinion, April 5: It was refreshing to see a rational professional evaluation of the effect of Prop. 209 on our UC system and the overall California advanced school system. As Wilson states, UC Berkeley and UCLA are by no means a measure of this fantastic school system California residents are blessed with--and pay for with exorbitant taxes. I had to bring my level of performance up before entering a major course of study and found that our undergraduate system is very adequate and students will hold their own when prepared for any course of study.
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