Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRonald W Caspers Wilderness Park
IN THE NEWS

Ronald W Caspers Wilderness Park

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | Researched by JANICE L. JONES / Los Angeles Times
1700s: Juaneno Indians live in Bell and San Juan canyons. 1841: Under Spanish rule, the land is granted to Augustin Olvera, who immediately sells it to Juan Forster. 1882: San Francisco businessmen Richard O'Neill and James Flood purchase the land. 1941: The O'Neill family, now sole owner, sells a 10,152 parcel to cattle ranchers Eugene and Applin Starr. 1971: Ranch is deeded to the Starr Foundation. 1974: Board of Supervisors, under the direction of Ronald W.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2003 | Zeke Minaya, Times Staff Writer
For more than two years, Ranger John Gannaway has been planning a party that the guest of honor is expected to flee at first opportunity. To mark the reopening of the nature center at the Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park today, Gannaway, the park's head ranger, will release a once-injured -- but now healthy -- hawk back into the wild. Gannaway said he won't take offense if the creature leaves the celebration a little early.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1995 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday hiked landfill fees 50% for the gardeners, construction workers and other small business owners who truck refuse to local landfills. * The board voted 3 to 0, with two supervisors absent, for the increase over the sole objection of hauler Paul Hyek of Fountain Valley, who complained that raising the fee from $10 to $15 for small pickup trucks threatens his ability to make a living.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998 | SUSAN DEEMER
Despite threats of mountain lion attacks in Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park, the City Council will urge county supervisors to keep the park open to minors. "It's very important we make it clear that this great asset we have is in jeopardy because people are not taking responsibility for their actions," Mayor Gil Jones said, explaining that visitors are warned about mountain lions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER
Spring is breathing new life into Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park, where 5,200 acres were scorched by fire last fall. The new season is helping the burned areas recover from the devastation, bringing an explosion of new colors and plant life to the park. Everything from shooting stars to Indian paintbrush is blooming in the park, officials say. "The wildflowers are starting to pop," said Jina Drury, a park technician. "It's very pretty."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998 | SUSAN DEEMER
Despite threats of mountain lion attacks in Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park, the City Council will urge county supervisors to keep the park open to minors. "It's very important we make it clear that this great asset we have is in jeopardy because people are not taking responsibility for their actions," Mayor Gil Jones said, explaining that visitors are warned about mountain lions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1996
Bird Watch--Beginning birders are invited on a guided walk in Caspers Wilderness Park this morning at 8:30. The hike will be led by members of South Coast Audubon, who will point out various bird species, trees and plants. Participants should bring binoculars and a bird reference book. Children are allowed in the park but must be supervised by an adult. Also bring a light snack and something to drink after the hike. Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park is off Interstate 5 on Ortega Highway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1997 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six year-old Christopher Sommers boasted Saturday about seeing three deer, nimble squirrels and a graceful hawk soaring over Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park. He was among the first children to visit the park since restrictions on minors were fully lifted. "This is my favorite park," the Laguna Hills boy bashfully admitted while climbing on tree stumps lining the park playground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1995 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Deep in the wilderness of a land preserve, Aurelie Bentley peered into a 16-inch-wide telescope and blinked at the million twinkling lights. * In a moment, Dan Manrique was adjusting the telescope, bringing into view something 22-year-old Bentley of Huntington Beach had always wanted to see: the brightly colored bands of Saturn, hundreds of millions of miles away. "I could see the rings," she said. "It's wonderful."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1998 | DAVID REYES and FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like other hikers here Friday, Pam Unsworth had heard about the recent scary cougar sighting and wanted to know from the park ranger's own lips the answer to her question: "Is it safe?" "Well, it is for this particular [mountain lion] because it has been caught and killed," replied Senior Park Ranger John Gannaway, not exactly putting Unsworth's mind at ease. Unsworth looked him in the eye and pressed her inquiry: "Well, would you walk on the trail?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1998 | TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just days after Orange County reopened a wilderness park to unlimited use by children, hikers reported being charged this week by an aggressive female mountain lion that came within three feet of youngsters. The Sunday incident involving the animal also known as a cougar has convinced county Supervisor Charles V. Smith that his board needs to consider reversing its decision to fully open Caspers Wilderness Park to minors for the first time in nearly six years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1997 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six year-old Christopher Sommers boasted Saturday about seeing three deer, nimble squirrels and a graceful hawk soaring over Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park. He was among the first children to visit the park since restrictions on minors were fully lifted. "This is my favorite park," the Laguna Hills boy bashfully admitted while climbing on tree stumps lining the park playground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1997 | JEAN PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Children will be allowed unlimited use of Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park, where a mountain lion mauled a 5-year-old girl nearly 12 years ago, county supervisors decided Tuesday. The park was closed to minors in 1992 after the family of Laura Small won a $2.1-million judgment, later reduced to $1.5 million, in their lawsuit against the county for a mountain lion attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1997 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A decade-long comeback from a notorious mountain lion attack may be completed today when the county Board of Supervisors considers lifting all restrictions on children using 7,600-acre Caspers Wilderness Park. For the first time since an outright ban in 1992--later relaxed by the county--children younger than 18 would be able to walk the trails at Caspers without a ranger's supervision.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1997 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Listen up, pinheads! There's a peak with your name on it at Caspers Wilderness Park. You can get an early start at Mollie's Famous Cafe in San Juan Capistrano. EARLY MORNING: 1 Mollie's opens at 5:30 a.m. Its stated philosophy is that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but Caspers park secretary Gina Drury says it's her choice for breakfast or lunch. "Good food, lots of it," agrees Mike Leone, a Mollie's regular.
TRAVEL
November 13, 1988 | MICHELE GRIMM and TOM GRIMM, The Grimms are free-lance writers/photographers living in Laguna Beach.
Ah, wilderness. Exit the freeway, drive eight miles inland and you'll discover that Orange County isn't all housing tracts, business centers and shopping plazas. Along the Ortega Highway is a piece of landscape that hasn't changed much since Gaspar Portola led the first Spanish exploration into the area in 1769. It's the Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park, 7,600 acres of natural beauty in the western foothills of the Santa Ana Mountains. The park is still the domain of wildlife.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1997 | JEAN PASCO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Children will be allowed unlimited use of Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park, where a mountain lion mauled a 5-year-old girl nearly 12 years ago, county supervisors decided Tuesday. The park was closed to minors in 1992 after the family of Laura Small won a $2.1-million judgment, later reduced to $1.5 million, in their lawsuit against the county for a mountain lion attack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1997 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Devin Kruse cranked his mountain bike up a canyon trail last month at Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park and abruptly came to a halt. Looking at the more than 100 horse riders enjoying the park's trails and lush wilderness as part of a two-day equestrian endurance run, Kruse said he realized that his next trip to the park would find those same trails badly battered by horses' hooves. "Now that it's over, the trails are in disrepair," fumed Kruse, 37.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1996 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As giggling kids hunted around for spent shell casings, the four dead cowboys stood up, dusted off their black hats and talked the talk of losers. "We all died," said the one they call Curly, "but at least I got one of the bad guys on the way down. And the kids loved it." Yes, the kids did love the mock Old West duel, and they also enjoyed the hayrides, nature exhibits and trail tours that were offered free Saturday at Adventure Day at Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park near San Juan Capistrano.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|