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Ronald W Pelton

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NEWS
May 17, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court said Monday that police officers may inspect trash placed at curb side for incriminating evidence, overturning the policy of California's state courts and reinstating drug evidence against a Laguna Beach man. On a 6-2 vote, the justices said that such police inspections do not violate the Fourth Amendment's ban on unreasonable searches because residents have no reason to believe that their discarded trash is private.
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NEWS
May 17, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court said Monday that police officers may inspect trash placed at curb side for incriminating evidence, overturning the policy of California's state courts and reinstating drug evidence against a Laguna Beach man. On a 6-2 vote, the justices said that such police inspections do not violate the Fourth Amendment's ban on unreasonable searches because residents have no reason to believe that their discarded trash is private.
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NEWS
June 7, 1986 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Fears that the trial of convicted spy Ronald W. Pelton would seriously compromise national security turned out to be unfounded, experts in international affairs and civil rights said Friday. A significant part of the reason, they said in interviews, was the ability of the prosecution to outline its case against the former National Security Agency communications specialist without disclosing intimate details of U.S. efforts to collect and analyze Soviet military communications.
NEWS
April 6, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
The scene reeked of an espionage scandal: a young Marine guard at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow and his lover, Galia, a buxom Soviet employee at the embassy, caught in the most compromising of situations in an American diplomat's private apartment. When it happened late last summer, U.S. punishment was swift. Sgt. Arnold Bracy, who seven months later would be arrested in a KGB sex-for-secrets operation that has devastated American interests in Moscow, was busted last Aug.
NEWS
May 30, 1986 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
After a hard drinking session last summer, accused spy Ronald W. Pelton was on his way to receive a telephone call that would have netted "a lot of money," but his car ran out of gas, his former girlfriend said Thursday. Ann Barry, testifying for the prosecution on the third day of Pelton's espionage trial, said that Pelton was "extremely upset" and told her: "Ann, that was our money. Now we're not going to have any." Barry, who lives in Washington, D.C.
NEWS
November 26, 1985 | GAYLORD SHAW and PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writers
Acting on a tip from double defector Vitaly Yurchenko, the FBI arrested a former National Security Agency communications specialist Monday and accused him of selling "extremely sensitive" intelligence data to the Soviet Union. It was the fourth espionage arrest by the FBI in five days in the Washington area, which is already reeling from an unparalleled series of spy scandals in recent months.
NEWS
June 9, 1986 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
After three weeks of skirmishes, the Reagan Administration and the press have declared a cordial truce in their war over leaks of national security secrets. Although both sides are claiming victory, neither seems quite sure who won. And both sides also agree on one other thing--new battles are yet to come. The CIA, which touched off the dispute when Director William J.
NEWS
November 29, 1985 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Accused spy Larry Wu-tai Chin, far from being merely a low-level translator for the CIA, had access to virtually every top-secret U.S. intelligence report on Asia for at least two decades and is thought to have funneled most of them to the Chinese government, senior U.S. intelligence officials said Thursday.
NEWS
April 6, 1987 | MICHAEL WINES and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
The scene reeked of an espionage scandal: a young Marine guard at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow and his lover, Galia, a buxom Soviet employee at the embassy, caught in the most compromising of situations in an American diplomat's private apartment. When it happened late last summer, U.S. punishment was swift. Sgt. Arnold Bracy, who seven months later would be arrested in a KGB sex-for-secrets operation that has devastated American interests in Moscow, was busted last Aug.
NEWS
July 24, 1986
Convicted spy Ronald W. Pelton has agreed to disclose the nature of the information he gave to Soviet agents about U.S. intelligence-gathering projects, officials said. Pelton, 44, who faces life imprisonment for each of the three espionage convictions last month, compromised top-secret information on U.S. eavesdropping capabilities. His sentencing, which was set for Monday, has been postponed. The government had said it might recommend a lighter sentence in exchange for the disclosures.
NEWS
June 9, 1986 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
After three weeks of skirmishes, the Reagan Administration and the press have declared a cordial truce in their war over leaks of national security secrets. Although both sides are claiming victory, neither seems quite sure who won. And both sides also agree on one other thing--new battles are yet to come. The CIA, which touched off the dispute when Director William J.
NEWS
June 7, 1986 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Fears that the trial of convicted spy Ronald W. Pelton would seriously compromise national security turned out to be unfounded, experts in international affairs and civil rights said Friday. A significant part of the reason, they said in interviews, was the ability of the prosecution to outline its case against the former National Security Agency communications specialist without disclosing intimate details of U.S. efforts to collect and analyze Soviet military communications.
NEWS
May 30, 1986 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
After a hard drinking session last summer, accused spy Ronald W. Pelton was on his way to receive a telephone call that would have netted "a lot of money," but his car ran out of gas, his former girlfriend said Thursday. Ann Barry, testifying for the prosecution on the third day of Pelton's espionage trial, said that Pelton was "extremely upset" and told her: "Ann, that was our money. Now we're not going to have any." Barry, who lives in Washington, D.C.
NEWS
November 29, 1985 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
Accused spy Larry Wu-tai Chin, far from being merely a low-level translator for the CIA, had access to virtually every top-secret U.S. intelligence report on Asia for at least two decades and is thought to have funneled most of them to the Chinese government, senior U.S. intelligence officials said Thursday.
NEWS
November 26, 1985 | GAYLORD SHAW and PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writers
Acting on a tip from double defector Vitaly Yurchenko, the FBI arrested a former National Security Agency communications specialist Monday and accused him of selling "extremely sensitive" intelligence data to the Soviet Union. It was the fourth espionage arrest by the FBI in five days in the Washington area, which is already reeling from an unparalleled series of spy scandals in recent months.
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