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Ronco Inc

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BUSINESS
March 26, 1997 | (Associated Press)
Ronco Inc., maker of the Popeil Pocket Fisherman, Veg-O-Matic and other products advertised on television, has agreed to be acquired by LA Group Inc. for $25 million in cash and stock. The deal should be completed within two months, LA Group President and Chief Executive Daniel Fasano said. LA Group, based in Rochester, N.Y., sells products through infomercials and "Seen on TV" kiosks in retail stores.
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BUSINESS
February 22, 1994 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Oddball products ranging from spray-on hair to Ginsu knives have sold like hotcakes in the often murky but wildly successful world of TV infomercials. Now the marketers that brought infomercials to TV are dialing up a new medium: radio. An onslaught of radio infomercials--slick, 30-minute ads that often sound more like talk shows or game shows--may soon bring products like the Thighmaster exercise kit to your AM dial.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
Ron Popeil, who has probably sold more gadgets than any salesman alive, said he is negotiating to sell all or part of his Beverly Hills company to a housewares concern or an investment banking company. Popeil is the creator of the Veg-O-Matic, the inside-the-shell egg scrambler and, more recently, fake hair in a can. "I would expect a sale to be completed in three to four months," the infomercial king said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1993 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mirage Hotel here is merely one of several casinos around town where thousands of people come hoping to make a fast buck. This week, more than a thousand others have descended on it in hopes of making a fast pitch.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Blame it on all those plums growing in Fay Duga's back yard. Rather than let them rot, Duga churns the plums into jelly and stores it in jars. But the work was getting to be a bit much for the 79-year-old resident of Highland Springs, so when she saw some widget called a food dehydrator advertised on a flashy, 30-minute TV commercial, she ordered one for $79.06. But Duga never could get her Ronco electric food dehydrator to work.
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This article is not available in stores! For a limited time only, you can own one of the most amazing works in journalism history! It illuminates! It entertains! It washes and waxes your car! It also tells the strange saga of TV pitchman Ron Popeil, a tale involving murder plots, multiple wives and a diet of chicken feet. But wait. There's more! Act now and we'll throw in Dear Abby, Laugh Lines and 39 comic strips absolutely free! For four decades, Popeil has sliced, diced and Mr.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1997 | TED ANTHONY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
For once, he is not on TV when he says it, that line usually belted out long after midnight on upper cable channels. It is, really, Ron Popeil's mantra. "LOOK at this!" he resonates. "Isn't this aMAZing?!" He's in a sweatsuit backstage at QVC, the cable home-shopping network, prepping for a 12-minute spot to unveil his newest innovation. But his mind is fixated momentarily on a previous Popeil product: GLH-9, better known as hair in a can. Simply discussing it doesn't do.
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