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Rong Yiren

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
China's former vice president, Rong Yiren, a textile magnate who joined with the country's communists and helped launch Deng Xiaoping's economic reforms, earning the nickname "red capitalist," has died, the government said Thursday. He was 89. Rong died Wednesday in Beijing of illness, the official Xinhua News Agency said. It did not give any other details.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
China's former vice president, Rong Yiren, a textile magnate who joined with the country's communists and helped launch Deng Xiaoping's economic reforms, earning the nickname "red capitalist," has died, the government said Thursday. He was 89. Rong died Wednesday in Beijing of illness, the official Xinhua News Agency said. It did not give any other details.
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NEWS
May 21, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One is the illegitimate son of a wealthy industrialist. The foundation of another's fortune was a long-ago U.S.-backed loan. A third is a notorious high-stakes gambler liable to risk millions of dollars in a day at the racetrack, while yet another furnishes his house in plastic. A capitalist who backed a revolution is on the list, as is a refugee from communism who is now devoting much of his energy to courting his giant Communist neighbors.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One is the illegitimate son of a wealthy industrialist. The foundation of another's fortune was a long-ago U.S.-backed loan. A third is a notorious high-stakes gambler liable to risk millions of dollars in a day at the racetrack, while yet another furnishes his house in plastic. A capitalist who backed a revolution is on the list, as is a refugee from communism who is now devoting much of his energy to courting his giant Communist neighbors.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Intellectual Property Forum Planned: China, stung by charges of soaring copyright piracy by private and even state firms, said Saturday it will host a major forum on protection of intellectual property rights. The symposium in May will bring together more than 200 Chinese and foreign experts to discuss strategies for patent, copyright and trademark protection, Xinhua news agency said.
BUSINESS
January 1, 2007 | From the Associated Press
China, aggressively seeking overseas energy assets to fuel its booming economy, said Sunday that one of its biggest conglomerates had bought the Kazakhstan oil assets of a Canadian company for $1.91 billion. China's CITIC Group bought the oil assets of Canada's Nations Energy Co. and granted KazMunaiGas, Kazakhstan's state-owned oil company, an option to a 50% interest in Nations Energy, the official New China News Agency said.
OPINION
March 16, 1997 | Tad Szulc, Tad Szulc is the author of John Paul II: The Biography (Scribners) and Fidel: A Critical Portrait (Avon)
Possibly since the early '90s, the Chinese government has sought to acquire intelligence about U.S. policy toward Beijing by illegally contributing money to the campaigns of certain American politicians. Simultaneously, the Chinese were moving to secure control of Hong Kong's economy before the British colony formally reverts to China on July 1.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China took key steps Saturday toward entrenching a successor generation of leaders in power, with Communist Party boss Jiang Zemin assuming the presidency and longtime security chief Qiao Shi getting the top parliamentary post. The moves were approved by huge majorities in the National People's Congress, China's rubber-stamp Parliament. They reflect the wishes of senior leader Deng Xiaoping, 88, who is trying to pass his power on to a small group centered on Jiang.
NEWS
January 8, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY and CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
China expelled three Canadian members of Parliament on Tuesday in apparent retaliation for their activities highlighting human rights abuses here. "I have never seen anyone . . . as unceremoniously and bodily manhandled and thrown around as I was--and my colleagues were--today," Geoffrey Scott, 53, a Progressive Conservative Party representative from Ontario, told reporters after arrival in the British colony of Hong Kong.
NEWS
June 29, 1985 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
China on Friday welcomed back a symbol of affluence not sold here since the Communists came to power 36 years ago--the Cadillac limousine. Executives from the Detroit headquarters of the General Motors Corp. proudly turned over to the China International Trust and Investment Corp. a fleet of 20 Fleetwood limousines,equipped with such items as television sets and ice storage. The organization is China's conduit for attracting foreign investment. U.S. Ambassador Arthur W. Hummel Jr.
NEWS
August 15, 2001 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Appalled by what they see as a sellout, Communist Party hard-liners have lashed out at Chinese President Jiang Zemin, warning that his recent comments opening the door for capitalists to join the party could lead to its collapse.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1994 | MAGGIE FARLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jardine Matheson, the powerful trading house that helped transform this colony into a jewel of the British Empire, moved closer Wednesday to completing a symbolic retreat begun a decade ago when Britain agreed to return Hong Kong to China. Jardine, which inspired James Clavell's novel "Noble House," removed two of its flagship affiliates--Jardine Matheson Holdings and Jardine Strategic Holdings--from the stock market here. The companies will be traded on the Singapore stock market next year.
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