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April 22, 1990 | WILLIAM WILSON
No one paying close attention would ever confuse a sculptor with a singer, but Roni Horn immediately reminds one of k.d. lang. Glimpsed across the vast space of the Museum of Contemporary Art's Temporary Contemporary satellite in Little Tokyo, where an exhibition of Horn's recent sculpture opens today, the 35-year-old Horn looks androgynous. With her close-cropped hair, tortoise specs and nondescript dungarees, she could maybe be a young Frank Stella.
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April 22, 1990 | WILLIAM WILSON
No one paying close attention would ever confuse a sculptor with a singer, but Roni Horn immediately reminds one of k.d. lang. Glimpsed across the vast space of the Museum of Contemporary Art's Temporary Contemporary satellite in Little Tokyo, where an exhibition of Horn's recent sculpture opens today, the 35-year-old Horn looks androgynous. With her close-cropped hair, tortoise specs and nondescript dungarees, she could maybe be a young Frank Stella.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1986 | COLIN GARDNER
One of the most consistently challenging New York sculptors to emerge in the aftermath of Minimalism, Roni Horn makes art that has been largely concerned with innate properties of such materials as lead, gold, rubber and wood. Associations with Minimalism are misleading because Horn eschews its closed, self-contained striving for "the ideal" in favor of a more open dialogue with both audience and environment.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1986 | COLIN GARDNER
One of the most consistently challenging New York sculptors to emerge in the aftermath of Minimalism, Roni Horn makes art that has been largely concerned with innate properties of such materials as lead, gold, rubber and wood. Associations with Minimalism are misleading because Horn eschews its closed, self-contained striving for "the ideal" in favor of a more open dialogue with both audience and environment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
New York artist Roni Horn has introduced her work to Los Angeles in the form of one small lead sculpture--displayed alone on the floor in the center of a spacious gallery--and, in an adjacent room, six little dry-pigment drawings. A thin debut? Not if you value art that enlists the sparest possible means to evoke maximum human presence. If Horn is a Minimalist, she's not of the sterile, industrial variety that hones art to a pristine geometry. Her art looks like concentrated vulnerability.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1998 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 27, writer, actor and teacher Danny Hoch of New York City is the youngest of five "mid-career" artists who will receive a $50,000, 1998 CalArts/Alpert Award in the Arts, announced today by the Herb Alpert Foundation, of Santa Monica, and the California Institute of the Arts. The awards will be presented May 16 at the foundation. Hoch plans to use the award to make sure his young peers get a chance to see his latest solo show, "Jails, Hospitals & Hip-Hop," which opened Wednesday at P.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1990 | SUVAN GEER
Picture a drop of water tumbling in gravity free space, trying to resolve itself into a perfect sphere. Now imagine that form caught and cast somehow in solid, bluish stainless steel and you'll have at least something of the impossible, pragmatic beauty in Roni Horn's sensuous "Asphere VII" sculptural installation at MOCA's Temporary Contemporary (to July 22). It's the first of five separate installations, each devoted to isolating and examining metallic "substance."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
The collection at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art is officially 10 pieces larger. At Saturday night's gala at the museum -- the culmination of its 29 th annual Collectors Committee weekend -- trustees, patrons and others voted on which works, from among curators' selections, the museum should acquire for its permanent collection. Nine works were on the ballot, representing a broad range for the encyclopedic museum, which has a collection that spans ancient Egyptian art to contemporary works; all nine were purchased, including a Japanese “Pair of Guardian Lions” from the 9 th century and contemporary works such as a 3,300-pound, lavender-hued glass work by Roni Horn and an interactive video game installation by Feng Mengbo.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1993 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Contrary to popular myth, great art does not always come from hunger. A thriving art scene is fueled by consumption, and consumption is fueled by money. Preferably, lots of it--as in Periclean Athens, Renaissance Florence and New York in the 1980s. Recessions, however, mean less money and less consumption; and Los Angeles, sadly, has been hard hit. But there's one place in Southern California where money, if it doesn't exactly flow, is still being made and spent.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1990 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The front and back covers to the catalogue for the exhibition "Donald Lipski: Poetic Sculpture" say a lot. One side pictures a sculpture made from an ordinary safety pin wrapped in twisted, purple rubber bands, like some new-wave fetish. The other shows a curved glass tube held by bulky metal clamps and filled with three dozen green apples in an indeterminate liquid, as if it were a lab experiment in biochemistry.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Nine o'clock on a Saturday morning might seem a tad early for an art opening, but this one, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, is particularly spirited. About 200 people -- trustees, patrons, museum curators and others, some of whom have flown in from Dallas and New York for the event -- stream into the lobby of LACMA's Resnick Pavilion, where a range of works have been staged across three galleries. At one end, a dapper man in a plaid sports jacket inspects an 18 th century painting by Antonio de Torres, “Virgin of Guadalupe,” with a magnifying glass (plucked from a bowl of them at the exhibit entrance)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Puns have been a staple of contemporary art ever since the rise of Neo-Dada brought Marcel Duchamp back into vogue four decades ago. With multiple and even contradictory meanings packed into a single word or image, they're perfect for an era of uncertainty (not to mention ecological conservation). Kori Newkirk spins out puns in his two strongest works on the theme of basketball at Rosamund Felsen Gallery, on the heels of Lakers mania.
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