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Ronnie Dawson

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The expression "keep on keepin' on" has a beads-and-incense, hippie-era tinge to it, but it's hard to think of a phrase that better sums up the life of Ronnie Dawson, a bristle-cut, twangy-voiced Texan who is a throwback to and a remnant of the early days of rock 'n' roll. As a teenager in the 1950s, Dawson scratched out a small footnote for himself in rock's early history by playing stripped-down rockabilly music.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Ronnie Dawson, a hard-rocking 1950s singer-guitarist who never gained widespread national fame but was revered in Texas throughout his four-decade career, died Tuesday at his home in east Dallas. He was 64, and had suffered from throat cancer. Unlike many rockers of his age, Dawson never gave up playing wherever he could.
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NEWS
February 16, 1995 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ronnie Dawson is one of those could've been, should've been, almost was and still-is-because-they-never-went-away kind of rock 'n' rollers. He could've been a big rock star back when even Beaver Cleaver and Dobie Gillis were getting dates, but then the payola scandal broke in 1960, which sidetracked his plans. Still Dawson, now 55, kept plugging away, never had to get a real job, until his career got a jump start in the late '80s.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The expression "keep on keepin' on" has a beads-and-incense, hippie-era tinge to it, but it's hard to think of a phrase that better sums up the life of Ronnie Dawson, a bristle-cut, twangy-voiced Texan who is a throwback to and a remnant of the early days of rock 'n' roll. As a teenager in the 1950s, Dawson scratched out a small footnote for himself in rock's early history by playing stripped-down rockabilly music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Ronnie Dawson, a hard-rocking 1950s singer-guitarist who never gained widespread national fame but was revered in Texas throughout his four-decade career, died Tuesday at his home in east Dallas. He was 64, and had suffered from throat cancer. Unlike many rockers of his age, Dawson never gave up playing wherever he could.
NEWS
March 31, 1994 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Moe Howard School of Child Rearing, where you line the little gum chewers up and slap 'em all at once, is definitely out this year. And don't expect anyone to cover the old Ramones tune, "Beat On The Brat" at the Fifth Annual Rockabilly Roundup at the Red Dog Saloon in Santa Barbara on Saturday night. As usual, this wingding is a benefit for C.A.L.M. (Child Abuse Listening & Mediation), the nonprofit agency in Santa Barbara whose aim it is to prevent, assess and treat child abuse.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1996 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The '90s rockabilly revival came to Orange County in a big way Saturday, with a four-band lineup at the Galaxy Concert Theatre in Santa Ana. Fortunately, each offered its own variations on the familiar recipe and demonstrated just how wonderfully timeless this raw, stripped-down sound can be. Veteran singer-guitarist Ronnie Dawson capped the 4 1/2-hour program with a generous, rousing, nearly two-hour performance that, for the most part, placed his feet firmly on modern soil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2000 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Sonny Mone Band, featuring a Conejo Valley guy with a long local track record, will be opening Sunday for bassist Victor Wooten at the Ventura Theatre. Mone is a guitar player out of Massachusetts who headed west and ended up playing in Neil Young's famous back-up band, Crazy Horse. But with the Horse out to pasture, the singer/guitarist is running his own show these days.
NEWS
February 16, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm covers pop music for The Times Orange County Edition.
If you want to experience romantic agony the safe way--by peeking in on somebody else's--you could go out and buy all seven volumes of Proust, give up television and hunker down for the next year or so. Or you could save time and buy a Sebadoh album. Give this Massachusetts band 40-odd minutes (the running time of its latest release, "Bakesale"), and it will give you a world of tunefully wrought obsessing over love's miseries.
NEWS
February 16, 1995 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ronnie Dawson is one of those could've been, should've been, almost was and still-is-because-they-never-went-away kind of rock 'n' rollers. He could've been a big rock star back when even Beaver Cleaver and Dobie Gillis were getting dates, but then the payola scandal broke in 1960, which sidetracked his plans. Still Dawson, now 55, kept plugging away, never had to get a real job, until his career got a jump start in the late '80s.
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