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Ronnie Dugger

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NEWS
June 1, 1997
I am writing in response to the May 18 Life & Style article "Texas Observer No More" by Josh Getlin. For some time, I have felt disenfranchised from the two major political parties because they won't do anything about corporate greed and what it is doing to the hopes and dreams of working people. People like to talk about how fantastic the economy is, but I don't see it in my own life. It's great for the rich, but the rest of us are still dealing with issues like downsizings, flat wages and the feeling that we'll never have a real future at the rate we're going.
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NEWS
June 1, 1997
I am writing in response to the May 18 Life & Style article "Texas Observer No More" by Josh Getlin. For some time, I have felt disenfranchised from the two major political parties because they won't do anything about corporate greed and what it is doing to the hopes and dreams of working people. People like to talk about how fantastic the economy is, but I don't see it in my own life. It's great for the rich, but the rest of us are still dealing with issues like downsizings, flat wages and the feeling that we'll never have a real future at the rate we're going.
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NEWS
May 18, 1997 | JOSH GETLIN
Just as Ronnie Dugger taught others, he himself was taught. And perhaps his greatest teacher was Lyndon B. Johnson. For years, the powerful Democrat had tried to stamp out renegade Texas progressives, with little success. One day, LBJ invited Dugger out to his ranch. As Johnson swam in his pool, the young editor sat respectfully in a chaise lounge. "Boy, what's the circulation of your magazine?" Johnson asked. "I'd say it's about 6,000, sir," Dugger answered.
NEWS
May 18, 1997 | JOSH GETLIN
Just as Ronnie Dugger taught others, he himself was taught. And perhaps his greatest teacher was Lyndon B. Johnson. For years, the powerful Democrat had tried to stamp out renegade Texas progressives, with little success. One day, LBJ invited Dugger out to his ranch. As Johnson swam in his pool, the young editor sat respectfully in a chaise lounge. "Boy, what's the circulation of your magazine?" Johnson asked. "I'd say it's about 6,000, sir," Dugger answered.
NEWS
May 18, 1997 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The memory fills Ronnie Dugger with pain, that quiet afternoon in 1974 when his father sat on the front porch of their San Antonio home, eyes brimming with tears. He'd been a lifelong Republican, a meat-and-potatoes conservative who believed in Richard Nixon and the party that elected him. But now William Dugger felt alone--and betrayed. "It was just after Watergate, and my father had suffered several strokes," Dugger recalls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1985
The Ronnie Reagan award for the ingenuous statement of the month should be awarded to Ronnie Dugger for the last sentence of his article: "But if he (Ortega) is just another dictator, we had all better find this out before, once again, the American left betrays the cause of civil liberties abroad." Of course, Ortega is not just another dictator. For the sake of argument, let's call him a Marxist dictator of a putative Communist state. If he were just another dictator the Reagan Administration would not be particularly concerned about civil liberties in Nicaragua.
NEWS
December 31, 1997 | JOSH GETLIN
Forming a local political group can be difficult and time-consuming. Creating an alternate political party is no picnic, either. But launching a national political movement composed of many different factions can be a nightmare. In 1997, Ronnie Dugger learned this the hard way. As co-chair of the Alliance for Democracy, he, along with thousands of other Americans, has taken on a target of staggering proportions: the transnational corporations that dominate so many aspects of modern life.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
He was complex and driven, a squinting, flap-eared, ruthless, big-drinking, chain-smoking, giant ruffian of a Texan who could eyeball a fella into doing what he wanted him to do. But his dreams of a grand new society without poverty were incinerated in the flames of America's ghettos and the napalm of Vietnam.
NEWS
October 23, 1999 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under fire for publishing a George W. Bush biography that contains damaging but unproved allegations of drug use, St. Martin's Press on Friday finally pulled the plug on the book, recalling all copies. The publisher said it took that highly unusual step after learning of the author's "questionable past." According to the Dallas Morning News, James Hatfield--who wrote "Fortunate Son: George W.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2006 | Michael Mewshaw, Special to The Times
Like star athletes, celebrated writers suffer several deaths before they finally die. Even at the apogee of their careers, they're subject to killing reviews, competitive jealousy and the occasional creative misfire. Then, unless they're extraordinarily lucky, they lose their imaginative powers and/or their readers. Even a novelist as exceptional as William Styron could not escape this melancholy fate.
NEWS
May 18, 1997 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The memory fills Ronnie Dugger with pain, that quiet afternoon in 1974 when his father sat on the front porch of their San Antonio home, eyes brimming with tears. He'd been a lifelong Republican, a meat-and-potatoes conservative who believed in Richard Nixon and the party that elected him. But now William Dugger felt alone--and betrayed. "It was just after Watergate, and my father had suffered several strokes," Dugger recalls.
NEWS
February 9, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER and MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writers
"I am besieged, by a thousand or more . . . I have sustained a continual bombardment . . . I shall never surrender or retreat. God and Texas, victory or death!" Every year on March 2, Texas Independence Day, John Tower stands before a band of loyal friends and former staff members to recite those words--a famous passage in the last letter Col. William Barret Travis wrote from the Alamo. This year, the words will carry a special poignancy. Like Travis, John Goodwin Tower is a man besieged.
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