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Ronnie Harmon

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SPORTS
January 2, 1986 | Scott Ostler
For Wrong Way Roy Riegels, for the last 57 years, it's been lonely at the bottom. Now Riegels has company. Roy Riegels is the Cal center whose wrong-way run with a recovered fumble in the '29 Rose Bowl led directly to a loss to Georgia Tech. For 57 years, Riegels' run has stood as the standard of futility against which all other bonehead plays and nightmare performances are measured. For 57 years, none could compare. Now . . . Roy, meet Ronnie.
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SPORTS
December 18, 1992 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ronnie Harmon cringes at the sight of a reporter walking toward his locker. Fortunately, he treats reporters better than defensive players who make their living trying to tackle him. But he stays and chats, all the while looking for a crease so he can dart up-field and out of the locker room, onto more comfortable terrain, the football field. But these days, interviews are slightly less painful to Harmon. He dances around fewer questions, and his answers are longer and more flowing.
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SPORTS
November 23, 1992 | DAVE DISTEL
When the Chargers have a first or second down, Stan Humphries will hand the ball to Marion Butts or pass the ball to Anthony Miller. Sometimes that will get it done and move the chains. Sometimes it won't. Get it to third down and the equation changes. Third down belongs to Ronnie Harmon. They go with what might be called their regular offensive packages when they want to gain yards. They introduce Harmon, an offensive package unto himself, when they have to gain yards.
SPORTS
November 15, 1991
Ronnie Harmon played football in Buffalo, but now that he's in San Diego, he has news for you: "It gets cold in San Diego." Harmon said Thursday's weather change left him unable to bend his knee. He was unable to practice much Thursday. If the Chargers had to play right now Harmon would not have been able to participate, Coach Dan Henning said. "It didn't come from an injury, it didn't come from a hit," Henning said. "It just happened."
SPORTS
September 5, 1991 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chargers' "Take It Easy On The Opposition" campaign is inexplicably under way. In the first game of the season, running back Ronnie Harmon touched the ball five times. Harmon, who is arguably the Chargers' most exciting player on offense, did not get the ball in the first or the third quarters of play against Pittsburgh. Those who know Ronnie Harmon only by his troubled reputation in Buffalo might be looking for an eruption from a disgruntled employee.
SPORTS
November 23, 1992 | DAVE DISTEL
When the Chargers have a first or second down, Stan Humphries will hand the ball to Marion Butts or pass the ball to Anthony Miller. Sometimes that will get it done and move the chains. Sometimes it won't. Get it to third down and the equation changes. Third down belongs to Ronnie Harmon. They go with what might be called their regular offensive packages when they want to gain yards. They introduce Harmon, an offensive package unto himself, when they have to gain yards.
SPORTS
June 29, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Big 10 investigators have concluded former University of Iowa running back Ronnie Harmon did not fumble intentionally when he lost the ball four times in the 1986 Rose Bowl, the NCAA News reported. Collegiate football officials and federal prosecutors apparently were asking the same question as many Iowa fans following the Hawkeyes' 45-28 loss to underdog UCLA: Why did the sure-handed Harmon lose the ball four times in one game after fumbling only once in 11 previous games?
SPORTS
December 1, 1991 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The football viewing public probably still looks upon Ronnie Harmon as the stiff who let Buffalo down after dropping what would have been a playoff-winning catch against Cleveland. But when fans around the country tune in tonight for the ESPN game of the week between the Chargers and Raiders, won't they be in for a surprise? "This is no stiff," said Charger nose tackle Joe Phillips. "If we were to elect a team MVP right now, it would probably be him.
SPORTS
November 15, 1991
Ronnie Harmon played football in Buffalo, but now that he's in San Diego, he has news for you: "It gets cold in San Diego." Harmon said Thursday's weather change left him unable to bend his knee. He was unable to practice much Thursday. If the Chargers had to play right now Harmon would not have been able to participate, Coach Dan Henning said. "It didn't come from an injury, it didn't come from a hit," Henning said. "It just happened."
SPORTS
October 7, 1991 | ALAN DROOZ.
It's probably no coincidence the Chargers recorded their first victory when Ronnie Harmon had his most prominent day on offense. Call it a Harmonic convergence. With the Raiders stuffing the Chargers' big backs in the early going, the Chargers went to a more varied offense, using Harmon for draws and quick pass plays that opened things up in the Chargers' 21-13 victory Sunday.
SPORTS
September 5, 1991 | T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chargers' "Take It Easy On The Opposition" campaign is inexplicably under way. In the first game of the season, running back Ronnie Harmon touched the ball five times. Harmon, who is arguably the Chargers' most exciting player on offense, did not get the ball in the first or the third quarters of play against Pittsburgh. Those who know Ronnie Harmon only by his troubled reputation in Buffalo might be looking for an eruption from a disgruntled employee.
SPORTS
March 24, 1990 | CURT HOLBREICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Chargers had a busy day in the free-agent market Friday, announcing they agreed to terms with six players, most notably running back Ronnie Harmon, a former first-round draft choice of the Buffalo Bills. Three kickers were included in the group, but none was Mike Lansford, the Rams' all-time leading scorer who worked out for the Chargers Thursday. The biggest addition was Harmon, the former Iowa player and 16th player taken in the 1986 draft.
SPORTS
March 7, 1989 | From Associated Press
Buffalo Bills running back Ronnie Harmon told a jury today that sports agents Lloyd Bloom and Norby Walters sought to represent him while he was a junior at Iowa, telling him that "there's nothing to gain" by waiting. "He (Bloom) said that this was my lucky day . . . and that he wanted to represent me," said Harmon, the first witness in the trial of Bloom and Walters.
SPORTS
December 30, 1985 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, Times Staff Writer
A few weeks ago, at the University of Iowa football banquet, star tailback Ronnie Harmon grabbed center stage again and refused to relinquish it. No one knew it at the time, but Harmon's one-man, off-Broadway show was about to open in Iowa City, and wasn't it nice that the folks around here were lucky enough to see it.
SPORTS
March 7, 1989 | From Associated Press
Buffalo Bills running back Ronnie Harmon told a jury today that sports agents Lloyd Bloom and Norby Walters sought to represent him while he was a junior at Iowa, telling him that "there's nothing to gain" by waiting. "He (Bloom) said that this was my lucky day . . . and that he wanted to represent me," said Harmon, the first witness in the trial of Bloom and Walters.
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