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Ronnie Lorenzo

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Splash, the tony Malibu restaurant that Los Angeles police investigators charged was an organized-crime front, should have its liquor license revoked because of a cover-up of its true ownership, according to a proposed decision by an administrative law judge. "It is still not clear just who owns how much of the business," Administrative Law Judge W.F. Byrnes said in a three-page proposed ruling, dated Oct. 12 and made public Thursday by the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1992
A federal judge Monday denied a new drug trial for former Malibu restaurateur Ronald A. Lorenzo, a reputed member of the Bonanno Mafia family. Lorenzo was convicted on a single conspiracy count in October after a two-week trial that featured defense testimony by actor James Caan, who said he was Lorenzo's best friend. U.S. District Judge Dickran Tevrizian denied the motion by defense attorney Gerald V.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
An attorney for the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control argued Monday that the liquor license for the Malibu restaurant Splash should be revoked because the popular hangout for show business personalities is secretly controlled by two San Fernando Valley businessmen with criminal records. "We know the people involved are dirty," attorney David B. Wainstein told an ABC license hearing in Los Angeles conducted by Administrative Law Judge William F. Byrnes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1992 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Malibu restaurateur Ronald A. Lorenzo, long described by law enforcement officials as an organized crime figure but never previously convicted of a crime, was found guilty Thursday on a federal drug conspiracy charge. A Los Angeles jury reached the verdict in its third day of deliberation, unswayed by defense testimony from actor James Caan, who called Lorenzo his best friend, and rejecting Lorenzo's claim that he was entrapped into a cocaine deal by an FBI informant. U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1992 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Caan, the actor who first gained fame as a mob kingpin's son in the classic film "The Godfather," has a new role in real life: Character witness for an alleged organized crime leader accused of cocaine trafficking and a string of robberies and kidnapings. Caan calls Ronald A. Lorenzo "my best friend."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1992
The federal drug conspiracy case against reputed mob figure Ronald A. Lorenzo went to the jury Friday after he admitted assisting in the sale of one kilogram of cocaine but insisted he was entrapped by an FBI informant. "He was always bringing up drugs with me," Lorenzo, 46, testified in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, referring to informant Robert Franchi, who secretly recorded numerous meetings with alleged Mafia contacts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1992 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Malibu restaurateur Ronald A. Lorenzo, long described by law enforcement officials as an organized crime figure but never previously convicted of a crime, was found guilty Thursday on a federal drug conspiracy charge. A Los Angeles jury reached the verdict in its third day of deliberation, unswayed by defense testimony from actor James Caan, who called Lorenzo his best friend, and rejecting Lorenzo's claim that he was entrapped into a cocaine deal by an FBI informant. U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1992
A federal judge Monday denied a new drug trial for former Malibu restaurateur Ronald A. Lorenzo, a reputed member of the Bonanno Mafia family. Lorenzo was convicted on a single conspiracy count in October after a two-week trial that featured defense testimony by actor James Caan, who said he was Lorenzo's best friend. U.S. District Judge Dickran Tevrizian denied the motion by defense attorney Gerald V.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1992 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor James Caan testified on Wednesday that his closest friend--an alleged organized-crime figure standing trial on cocaine trafficking charges--was, to his knowledge, a law-abiding citizen. Caan, who gained stardom as the son of a mob chieftain in the 1972 film classic, "The Godfather," testified in U.S. District Court that he has lent the defendant, Ronald A. Lorenzo, thousands of dollars during the course of their friendship.
MAGAZINE
April 14, 1996 | Paul Lieberman, Times Staff Writer Paul Lieberman has covered organized crime for more than two decades. His last story for the magazine was on the New England mob's bid to enter Hollywood
In the parlance of their trade, the Beverly Hills robbers were "professionals." They had staked out the 21-room mansion for weeks, even conducting dress rehearsals during which they crept along the service alley and climbed the 7-foot-high wrought-iron fence--masks, gloves and radios at the ready. They knew there was a staff of two--the butler and his wife--and that, each night, the butler headed toward North Elm Drive to walk the dog, a Belgian Schipperke. This night, Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1992
The federal drug conspiracy case against reputed mob figure Ronald A. Lorenzo went to the jury Friday after he admitted assisting in the sale of one kilogram of cocaine but insisted he was entrapped by an FBI informant. "He was always bringing up drugs with me," Lorenzo, 46, testified in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, referring to informant Robert Franchi, who secretly recorded numerous meetings with alleged Mafia contacts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1992 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor James Caan testified on Wednesday that his closest friend--an alleged organized-crime figure standing trial on cocaine trafficking charges--was, to his knowledge, a law-abiding citizen. Caan, who gained stardom as the son of a mob chieftain in the 1972 film classic, "The Godfather," testified in U.S. District Court that he has lent the defendant, Ronald A. Lorenzo, thousands of dollars during the course of their friendship.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1992 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Caan, the actor who first gained fame as a mob kingpin's son in the classic film "The Godfather," has a new role in real life: Character witness for an alleged organized crime leader accused of cocaine trafficking and a string of robberies and kidnapings. Caan calls Ronald A. Lorenzo "my best friend."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Splash, the tony Malibu restaurant that Los Angeles police investigators charged was an organized-crime front, should have its liquor license revoked because of a cover-up of its true ownership, according to a proposed decision by an administrative law judge. "It is still not clear just who owns how much of the business," Administrative Law Judge W.F. Byrnes said in a three-page proposed ruling, dated Oct. 12 and made public Thursday by the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1989 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
An attorney for the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control argued Monday that the liquor license for the Malibu restaurant Splash should be revoked because the popular hangout for show business personalities is secretly controlled by two San Fernando Valley businessmen with criminal records. "We know the people involved are dirty," attorney David B. Wainstein told an ABC license hearing in Los Angeles conducted by Administrative Law Judge William F. Byrnes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Splash, a fashionable Malibu restaurant which Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl F. Gates once alleged was a conduit for laundering drug money, has been ordered by the state Alcoholic Beverage Control Department to surrender its liquor license by May 24. ABC Director Jay Stroh said he made the decision to revoke the license "based on our independent investigation" that almost half of Splash's stock was transferred to two individuals with criminal records without his agency's knowledge.
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