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February 12, 2000 | DAN WEBER
Ronnie Robertson, an Olympic, world and U.S. figure skating silver medalist in 1956, died Feb. 4 at Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center in Fountain Valley after a long illness. Robertson, 62, coached at the Irvine Ice Arena the past two years. Before that, he coached for several years in Paramount. Considered the fastest spinner in the history of the sport, Robertson, who skated professionally for almost 22 years and earned more than $1.5 million, was called "The King of Spin" and "The Blur."
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SPORTS
March 26, 2000 | DIANE PUCIN
To Dick Button, Ronnie Robertson was the best spinner he had ever seen, a fabulous athlete who certainly would have been landing quads if he were a figure skater of the present era. A silver medalist at the 1956 Olympics, Robertson didn't win the gold, says Button, because of those pesky school figures, the mundane ice tracings that were required of figure skaters until the early 1990s. To Linda Ko at the Irvine Ice Arena, Robertson wasn't an Olympic gold medalist.
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SPORTS
December 18, 1992 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ronnie Robertson looks across the Iceland rink and laughs as he tells how his ice skating career got off to a whirlwind start there nearly 50 years ago. Back then, a 6-year-old Robertson skated to the edge of the rink, doused himself in the melted ice and then searched for a group of girls to tease. He skated up to them and started spinning, spraying water like a soggy dog after his first bath, all over the shrieking girls.
SPORTS
February 12, 2000 | DAN WEBER
Ronnie Robertson, an Olympic, world and U.S. figure skating silver medalist in 1956, died Feb. 4 at Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center in Fountain Valley after a long illness. Robertson, 62, coached at the Irvine Ice Arena the past two years. Before that, he coached for several years in Paramount. Considered the fastest spinner in the history of the sport, Robertson, who skated professionally for almost 22 years and earned more than $1.5 million, was called "The King of Spin" and "The Blur."
SPORTS
March 26, 2000 | DIANE PUCIN
To Dick Button, Ronnie Robertson was the best spinner he had ever seen, a fabulous athlete who certainly would have been landing quads if he were a figure skater of the present era. A silver medalist at the 1956 Olympics, Robertson didn't win the gold, says Button, because of those pesky school figures, the mundane ice tracings that were required of figure skaters until the early 1990s. To Linda Ko at the Irvine Ice Arena, Robertson wasn't an Olympic gold medalist.
SPORTS
February 9, 2000
Ronnie Robertson, an Olympic, world and U.S. figure skating silver medalist in 1956, died Friday at Orange Coast Memorial Medical Center in Fountain Valley after a long illness. Robertson, 62, had coached at the Irvine Ice Arena for the past two years. Before that, he coached for several years in Paramount. Considered the fastest spinner in the history of figure skating, Robertson, who skated professionally for almost 22 years and earned more than $1.
SPORTS
February 14, 1998 | Los Angeles Times
STORYLINE: Lost in the uproar over Ilia Kulick's costume and the rivalry between Elvis Stojko of Canada and Todd Eldredge of the United States is Michael Weiss' attempt to become the first person to land a quadruple lutz. The American lands the quad lutz cleanly only about 10% of the time in practice. He's counting on the adrenaline of the competition to help him nail the jump in Nagano and raise the bar for the entire sport. HOW THEY STAND after the short program (factored placings): 1.
SPORTS
September 17, 1985 | JIM MURRAY
When Chris Bowman was growing up in the Valley, he was such a hyperactive little child, the neighbors wondered whether it wouldn't be a good idea for his mother to put him on ice for a while. So she did. For the next 15 years. A clear-cut case of child abuse? Not exactly. Chris Bowman got to love ice. So much so that after the first couple of years, his parents panicked and tried to lure him off it.
SPORTS
May 24, 1993 | RANDY HARVEY
Carl Lewis complains that some among the media emphasize what they perceive to be his negatives--his flamboyance, his candor, his occasional lack of humility, even his singing voice. Either they don't particularly like him, or they have him confused with Roseanne Arnold. But one problem could be that Lewis does not emphasize his positives, such as a recent gift that not even his manager, Joe Douglas of the Santa Monica Track Club, learned of until told by a reporter last week.
SPORTS
August 16, 2002 | HELENE ELLIOTT
It would have taken a lot more than a broken toe to keep Tabitha Yim out of the U.S. gymnastics championships. Or a broken toe and an injured hip. Or the broken toe, injured hip and fractured ankle the Irvine teenager suffered in miserable succession over six months within the last year. "It was pretty tough," she said of her enforced training break. "I did a lot of conditioning and strength exercises." That work served her well at last week's U.S.
SPORTS
December 18, 1992 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ronnie Robertson looks across the Iceland rink and laughs as he tells how his ice skating career got off to a whirlwind start there nearly 50 years ago. Back then, a 6-year-old Robertson skated to the edge of the rink, doused himself in the melted ice and then searched for a group of girls to tease. He skated up to them and started spinning, spraying water like a soggy dog after his first bath, all over the shrieking girls.
SPORTS
February 21, 2002 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every step of the way, Michelle Kwan has insisted she's not motivated by the potential rewards at the end of her Olympic journey, but by the richness of the experiences en route. The favorite to win the gold medal at the 1998 Nagano Games--especially after she entered the final phase of the competition in first place--she was passed by a more exuberant and relaxed Tara Lipinski and instead got the silver medal.
NEWS
February 12, 2002 | BILL DWYRE and ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The red, white and blue Games of Salt Lake City added gold, silver and bronze to the color scheme here Monday when the young U.S. men's snowboarding team swept their sport's marquee event. The sweep was the first by an American Winter Olympic team since 1956, taking place before a wildly enthusiastic home crowd that swelled to as many as 30,000 when the morning women's downhill event was postponed by high winds.
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