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REAL ESTATE
November 4, 2001
After 30 years in the U.S. Navy covering duty in three wars, we retired to our home in 1970, hoping we would live happily ever after. All went well until we decided to have our home re-roofed. The roofers re-roofed and, without any qualms or hesitation, I paid the roofer and thanked him for a job well done. Some time later, after receiving a California Preliminary Notice, I got the impression that something was amiss. I called the originator of the notice and was informed that this was "required by statute ... which in no way indicates the existence of a lien."
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NATIONAL
July 24, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Marc Fucarile left a Boston hospital Wednesday, the last of those wounded in the bombing that traumatized the city and the nation 100 days ago. “Today marks the 100th day of me in the hospital, not being able to spend the night with my boy or fiancee. You know, it's been tough,” Fucarile told reporters as his son, Gavin, stood next to him and giggled happily. On April 15, two bombs exploded along the ending segment of the Boston Marathon. Three people were killed and more than 260 injured in the explosions.
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REAL ESTATE
November 28, 1999
Hal Muller recently wrote ("Letters," Nov. 14) that roofing felt is not just a backup waterproof membrane, but the primary moisture barrier. If it is either of these, then I may be in for big trouble. I recently had my house re-roofed by a reputable local roofer, and discovered that the workers were making long horizontal knife cuts in the heavy tar paper. When I asked, a worker told me this was standard practice, done to level out roofing paper that had buckled a bit in the hot sun. Otherwise the shingles wouldn't lay flat and the job would look bad, he said.
WORLD
January 28, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko, Los Angeles Times
MOSCOW - They have discovered a world where no rules or laws apply, where they can be heroes, if only for a few terrifying minutes. They are skywalkers, or roofers, as they proudly call themselves. The craze, which is believed to have started a few years back with a couple of young Russians, now has hundreds of followers here and thousands of others around the globe. It works this way: The roofers climb a skyscraper, a construction crane, a tall monument, a tower or a bridge.
REAL ESTATE
May 31, 1998
The letters from first-time home buyers who had problems in spite of home inspections ("Tales From the Trenches," May 10) suggested that buyers should have a plumber, roofer and electrician inspect instead of or in addition to a general inspector. The reason buyers began using general inspectors--who do no work and recommend no workers, they only inspect--is because plumbers, roofers and electricians are not in the business of telling people that property is in good or even reasonable condition.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Marc Fucarile left a Boston hospital Wednesday, the last of those wounded in the bombing that traumatized the city and the nation 100 days ago. “Today marks the 100th day of me in the hospital, not being able to spend the night with my boy or fiancee. You know, it's been tough,” Fucarile told reporters as his son, Gavin, stood next to him and giggled happily. On April 15, two bombs exploded along the ending segment of the Boston Marathon. Three people were killed and more than 260 injured in the explosions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1995 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
OK, so it's not a catastrophic mudslide or a broken bridge or a flooded field. But that squishy carpet with the peculiar wet-goat smell definitely qualifies as a nuisance. So does the mucky basement. The peeling paint. And of course, the army of black ants swarming possessively around the kitchen sink. Far from the spectacular calamities that grabbed so much attention this weekend, homeowners across Southern California spent Monday toting up their own losses. And found them considerable.
SPORTS
February 19, 1990 | From Wire Service Reports
Nadia Comaneci confirmed rumors that she tried to kill herself at age 15 by drinking bleach, according to Life magazine's March issue. Comaneci said she was hospitalized for two days and was "glad because I didn't have to go to the gym," according to the magazine. It had been rumored, and the 1984 film "Nadia" indicated, that Comaneci attempted suicide at the height of her fame in 1977 after scoring perfect 10s in the Montreal Olympics in 1976. She had denied the rumors, however.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1990
A 23-year-old roofer suffered burns over 20% of his body Thursday when a propane stove he was using ignited and exploded at a small business in Poway, authorities said. Greg M. Koenig was listed in serious condition Thursday night at the burn unit of UC San Diego Medical Center, a spokeswoman said. The explosion occurred at 6:09 p.m. at the Complete Roof Care Co., at 12350 Oak Noll Road in Poway, said a spokesman for the San Diego County Sheriff's Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1992 | MICHELLE QUINN
Authorities on Saturday identified a Port Hueneme man found dead from gunshot wounds to the chest as Ramiro Mendoza, a 33-year-old roofer. Mendoza is the city's first slaying victim this year, Deputy Coroner Dale Zentzis said. Police have no leads on who may have killed the roofer, who was on disability because of an accident on the job, said Sgt. Fernando Estrella, a Port Hueneme detective in charge of the case. "This is a real whodunit right now," Estrella said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2004 | Andrew Blankstein, Richard Winton and Monte Morin, Times Staff Writers
Sheriff's deputies shot and wounded a roofer whom they mistook for a gunman during a chaotic shooting Wednesday near Carson that left the alleged gunman dead, a sheriff's spokesman said. The roofer was shot in the arm as he and another worker spread tar on the roof of the Melody Liquor Store near Normandie Avenue and Torrance Boulevard. Moments earlier, deputies had shot and killed a man who confronted them in the street with an assault rifle. The incident occurred about 9:20 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2002 | MARJORIE HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Family members crowded into the pediatric intensive-care unit of UCI Medical Center in Orange on Monday to show support for a critically injured 2-year-old boy mauled by a pit bull over the weekend. Authorities said the dog's owner has agreed to have the animal euthanized. John Michael Macias-Drisner of Orange remains in stable condition after three hours of surgery Saturday night following the mauling that day in La Habra.
REAL ESTATE
November 4, 2001
After 30 years in the U.S. Navy covering duty in three wars, we retired to our home in 1970, hoping we would live happily ever after. All went well until we decided to have our home re-roofed. The roofers re-roofed and, without any qualms or hesitation, I paid the roofer and thanked him for a job well done. Some time later, after receiving a California Preliminary Notice, I got the impression that something was amiss. I called the originator of the notice and was informed that this was "required by statute ... which in no way indicates the existence of a lien."
MAGAZINE
December 3, 2000 | JIM HEIMANN
Nearly lost in Southern California's sea of color-coordinated tract homes are the often whimsical creations of early 20th century builders who dotted the region with ersatz Persian palaces, turreted medieval castles, Spanish haciendas and French chateaus. Sometimes they topped those homes with elaborate shingled roofs that seemed drawn from the pages of "Hansel and Gretel."
BUSINESS
March 14, 2000 | E. Scott Reckard
A Costa Mesa roofing company will pay $58,608 in back wages and penalties to settle federal charges of failing to pay overtime and allowing an employee under 18 to work on roofs, U.S. Labor Department officials said Monday. Reroofing Specialists Inc., commonly known as Petronella Roofing, agreed to pay $44,908 in back wages to 111 workers and $13,700 in penalties for knowingly violating federal wage and child-labor laws, the officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2000 | NANCY KINSEY NEEDHAM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you are running out of buckets to protect your carpet from the rain, it might be time to consider a new roof. And since it's such a sizable investment, you should do lots of research before signing a contract. Don't just open the phone book and pick the biggest, smallest or prettiest ad. Every leak doesn't necessarily mean a new roof is needed. Some just need caulking around the fireplace or vents.
NEWS
January 23, 1988 | United Press International
A federal judge Friday rejected pleas for leniency and handed down sentences of up to 15 years for union roofers convicted of bribing judges and intimidating contractors through violence. The heaviest sentence fell on Stephen Traitz Jr., leader of Roofers Local 30-30B, who received 15 years, a $50,000 fine and five years of probation. Traitz, his two sons and 10 other officials were convicted Nov.
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | Associated Press
A roofing contractor with a big sales staff but few construction workers was accused Friday of fleecing more than 100 hurricane victims out of $440,000, investigators said. Mackey Wiggins, owner of Alpha & Omega Roofing Co., has been a licensed roofer in Miami since 1977.
REAL ESTATE
November 28, 1999
Hal Muller recently wrote ("Letters," Nov. 14) that roofing felt is not just a backup waterproof membrane, but the primary moisture barrier. If it is either of these, then I may be in for big trouble. I recently had my house re-roofed by a reputable local roofer, and discovered that the workers were making long horizontal knife cuts in the heavy tar paper. When I asked, a worker told me this was standard practice, done to level out roofing paper that had buckled a bit in the hot sun. Otherwise the shingles wouldn't lay flat and the job would look bad, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1998 | SOLOMON MOORE
A roofer was in critical condition Friday after an accident left him bathed in boiling tar, causing second- and third-degree burns over 50% of his body. Paramedics lifted him from the roof of an auto repair shop and transported him by helicopter to the Grossman Burn Center in Sherman Oaks. Elias Tebalan, 28, of Los Angeles, was carrying two pails of hot tar about 1:15 p.m. on the roof of Super-Tech Auto Service at 20124 Sherman Way when he stumbled on a piece of plywood that gave way.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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