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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2000 | NANCY KINSEY NEEDHAM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you are running out of buckets to protect your carpet from the rain, it might be time to consider a new roof. And since it's such a sizable investment, you should do lots of research before signing a contract. Don't just open the phone book and pick the biggest, smallest or prettiest ad. Every leak doesn't necessarily mean a new roof is needed. Some just need caulking around the fireplace or vents.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2000 | NANCY KINSEY NEEDHAM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you are running out of buckets to protect your carpet from the rain, it might be time to consider a new roof. And since it's such a sizable investment, you should do lots of research before signing a contract. Don't just open the phone book and pick the biggest, smallest or prettiest ad. Every leak doesn't necessarily mean a new roof is needed. Some just need caulking around the fireplace or vents.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1996 | RICHARD SIMON and PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Call it L.A.--as in "Leaks Alot." Even having a roof over their heads hasn't kept some people dry from the rain. So what if Washington leads the nation in political leaks? Los Angeles has a good share of the wet kind. In medical complexes. In office buildings. In homes. Even 65 feet underground in the city's 3-year-old subway. Roofers in Drip City reported a downpour of calls for help Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1998
Roofers have resumed repairing schools after being stopped for more than two weeks by the Compton Fire Department, which had a contractor arrested for allegedly not having the proper city permits to operate a propane-ignited boiler for heating roofing materials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stormy weather had unloaded on homeowner Efren Meza before the roofers could finish their work. So on Wednesday, the workers were struggling to wrap his house in plastic before Meza rained wrath all over them. But the same winds that were blowing a new storm toward the South-Central Los Angeles neighborhood were causing the huge blue tarps to billow wildly as the crew tried to nail them to Meza's bare plywood roof. Fortunately, from his front yard, Meza was proving unflappable.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once again, fire officials say wood-shingle roofs made a hellish inferno worse, sending it roaring from housetop to housetop through yet another California neighborhood. And once again, the disaster has ignited political fires as well, prompting state and local officials either to recommend banning wood shingles on future construction, or at least making them safer. A somber Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1998 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The teachers had headaches, the students felt nauseated and some youngsters even had spots of asphalt on their clothing after a company came to a Compton elementary school during class hours to repair a roof. The Fire Department warned that work should be performed after school hours because the repairs were creating health problems. The roofing company foreman balked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
The City Council, in its first meeting since firestorms threatened the the city two weeks ago, tonight is scheduled to discuss city regulations relating to wood-shake roofing materials. City officials said they would brief the council on existing fire and building codes and solicit ideas for modifying them. No action will be taken, but council members are expected to express their views on how the city handled the fire crisis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1993
A Los Angeles City Council committee angrily recommended rejection Monday of a request by the manufacturers of wood roof shingles to allow their products to be used in the city. The council's Public Safety Committee voted against altering a city ordinance, approved in 1989, that prohibits the construction of new wood roofs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1991
A federal judge, rejecting a challenge by five business groups, has ruled that the city of Los Angeles' ban on new wood shake and shingle roofs is constitutional. U.S. District Court Judge Robert M. Takasugi, in a decision made public Wednesday, held that the 1989 ordinance "is rationally related to the interests of the city in reducing the danger of widespread structure fires. . . ."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1998 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The teachers had headaches, the students felt nauseated and some youngsters even had spots of asphalt on their clothing after a company came to a Compton elementary school during class hours to repair a roof. The Fire Department warned that work should be performed after school hours because the repairs were creating health problems. The roofing company foreman balked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1996 | RICHARD SIMON and PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Call it L.A.--as in "Leaks Alot." Even having a roof over their heads hasn't kept some people dry from the rain. So what if Washington leads the nation in political leaks? Los Angeles has a good share of the wet kind. In medical complexes. In office buildings. In homes. Even 65 feet underground in the city's 3-year-old subway. Roofers in Drip City reported a downpour of calls for help Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
The City Council, in its first meeting since firestorms threatened the the city two weeks ago, tonight is scheduled to discuss city regulations relating to wood-shake roofing materials. City officials said they would brief the council on existing fire and building codes and solicit ideas for modifying them. No action will be taken, but council members are expected to express their views on how the city handled the fire crisis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1993
A Los Angeles City Council committee angrily recommended rejection Monday of a request by the manufacturers of wood roof shingles to allow their products to be used in the city. The council's Public Safety Committee voted against altering a city ordinance, approved in 1989, that prohibits the construction of new wood roofs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1991
A federal judge, rejecting a challenge by five business groups, has ruled that the city of Los Angeles' ban on new wood shake and shingle roofs is constitutional. U.S. District Court Judge Robert M. Takasugi, in a decision made public Wednesday, held that the 1989 ordinance "is rationally related to the interests of the city in reducing the danger of widespread structure fires. . . ."
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once again, fire officials say wood-shingle roofs made a hellish inferno worse, sending it roaring from housetop to housetop through yet another California neighborhood. And once again, the disaster has ignited political fires as well, prompting state and local officials either to recommend banning wood shingles on future construction, or at least making them safer. A somber Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1998
Roofers have resumed repairing schools after being stopped for more than two weeks by the Compton Fire Department, which had a contractor arrested for allegedly not having the proper city permits to operate a propane-ignited boiler for heating roofing materials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1989
Seeking to stop a landmark Los Angeles fire safety ordinance, the makers of wood roofing products on Monday asked a federal judge to declare the city's ban on new cedar shake roofs unconstitutional. Lawyers for four shingle manufacturers and the Cedar Shake and Shingle Bureau, a trade organization representing 250 manufacturers of fire-retardant wood shingles, said the ordinance that went into effect on Saturday "unfairly discriminates" against them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stormy weather had unloaded on homeowner Efren Meza before the roofers could finish their work. So on Wednesday, the workers were struggling to wrap his house in plastic before Meza rained wrath all over them. But the same winds that were blowing a new storm toward the South-Central Los Angeles neighborhood were causing the huge blue tarps to billow wildly as the crew tried to nail them to Meza's bare plywood roof. Fortunately, from his front yard, Meza was proving unflappable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1990 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Combining politics with private enterprise, former President Ronald Reagan appeared at a fund-raiser for Sen. Pete Wilson's gubernatorial campaign in San Diego on Wednesday, then earned a five-figure speaking fee by addressing a roofing-industry convention. During his roughly four hours in San Diego, Reagan helped raise about $200,000 for Wilson's campaign for the Republican gubernatorial nomination, then picked up an estimated $50,000 for appearing at the National Roofing Contractors Assn.
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