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Rooftops

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2003 | Bob Pool, Times Staff Writer
The chirping of birds and the whoops of children frolicking in the grassy hollow give the hilltop a sense of serenity now. It was different 40 years ago. There was a gurgling sound, a warning scream and finally a whooshing roar as death and destruction swept down a ridge into a Los Angeles neighborhood. The Baldwin Hills Dam collapsed with the fury of a thousand cloudbursts, sending a 50-foot wall of water down Cloverdale Avenue and slamming into homes and cars on Dec. 14, 1963.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2001 | KIMI YOSHINO
Huntington Beach police arrested a burglary suspect early Friday as he was jumping across rooftops of neighboring businesses. Michael W. Sanders, 29, of Colton, was arrested on suspicion of commercial burglary after breaking into the Quick Change Lube and Oil on Warner Avenue, Huntington Beach police said. Police responding to a burglar alarm just after 4 a.m. spotted Sanders jumping between buildings.
NEWS
January 17, 1991
The Glendale Planning Commission this week approved proposed city ordinance revisions that would allow homeowners to place satellite-dish antennas on their rooftops. The City Council will consider the revisions Jan. 29. They would require residents to obtain approval from the city's design review board before installing the antennas and also to screen them from view.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1997 | PHILIP BRANDES
Affirming that the second half of life is more than just "a halfway house to the grave," "Tom Tom on a Rooftop" at Theatre West proves a serviceable, if not particularly original, vehicle for putting a spotlight on the issue of ageism. Daniel Keough's good-natured new comedy is an upbeat urban myth about seniors in a run-down apartment building overcoming the stereotypes they've internalized about growing old.
SPORTS
July 19, 1992 | WILL GRIMSLEY, Associated Press SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
Will Grimsley covered nine Summer Olympics and six Winter Games for The Associated Press, including the 1972 Munich Games in which 11 members of the Israeli team were killed in a terror attack. For a weary, slumbering newsman, the frantic knock on the steel door of room 4-B on the second floor of the Olympic press dormitory had the impact of a thunderclap. "The office said to get over to the Village right away," blurted a breathless messenger.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2009 | Tiffany Hsu
On bright days, the rooftop of the Anaheim Hilton is so blindingly white that it looks like a mirror positioned directly at the sun. That dazzling glare might just be the greenest thing to happen to the top of a building since solar panels. The white coating deflects nearly 85% of the heat that hits it, reducing the surface temperature by as much as 50 degrees. That means less energy is needed to cool the hotel's interior, cutting air-conditioning costs and carbon emissions.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
Los Angeles County could create tens of thousands of new jobs and reduce global-warming-causing carbon emissions if solar-voltaic panels are installed on just 5% of available rooftops, says a just-issued report. The study by the Environmental Defense Fund and the Luskin Center for Innovation at UCLA, released Wednesday, predicts that 29,000 installer jobs would open up. Carbon emissions would be reduced by 1.25 million tons, the equivalent of taking a quarter of a million cars off the roads each year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2001
A would-be rapist fell two stories from a parking garage roof early Thursday after a woman fought him off and witnesses chased him to the edge of the roof, police said. Rodney Bogans, 43, suffered a broken ankle and a broken wrist after he fell while trying to jump an 8-foot gap between rooftops, authorities said. He was discovered hiding behind a tree and arrested on suspicion of attempted rape, Officer Charles Rodriguez said.
SPORTS
March 12, 1989
Chicago, having resolved the great night baseball debate, has come up with a new cause to ignite fans on the city's North Side. And the latest brouhaha doesn't make Donald Grenesko, president of the Cubs, any happier than the last. At issue are the team's traditional rooftop rooters, and a controversial proposal to launch a private club atop a building across from Wrigley Field that would sell seats for baseball games.
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